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MemberDennis Looney

Since 2014, I have served as director of the Office of Programs and director of the Association of Departments of Foreign Languages at MLA. For the Office of Programs I oversee projects relating to the profession, such as departmental reviews, the ongoing examination of faculty rights and responsibilities, monitoring educational and curricular changes, and the development of statements of best practices. As director of ADFL, I oversee the Language Consultancy Service, the MLA Language Map, the language enrollment database, survey, and report, and other projects focused on languages other than English. From 1986 to 2013, I taught Italian at the University of Pittsburgh, with secondary appointments in classics and philosophy. I was chair of the Department of French and Italian for eleven years and assistant dean of the humanities for three years at Pitt. Publications include Compromising the Classics: Romance Epic Narrative in the Italian Renaissance (1996), which received honorable mention in the 1996–97 joint Howard R. Marraro Prize and Scaglione Award in Italian Studies from the MLA, and Freedom Readers: The African American Reception of Dante Alighieri and the Divine Comedy (2011), which received the American Association of Italian Studies Book Prize (general category) in 2011. With D. Mark Possanza, I am co-editor and translator of Ludovico Ariosto’s Latin Poetry, I Tatti Renaissance Library, Harvard University Press (2018). Some key research interests: Renaissance Studies; comparative literature; reception of the classical tradition; vernacular classicism; history of the book; Italian; Latin; Greek; Medievalisms; Dante; Divine Comedy; Matteo Maria Boiardo; Ludovico Ariosto; Torquato Tasso; romance/epic; Neo-Latin poetry; Herodotus.  

MemberElizabeth Hale

I work at the University of New England in the high country of New South Wales.  I teach and research in children’s literature and classical reception studies.  I lead the Australasian wing of the ERC-funded Our Mythical Childhood project (Grant agreement No 681202) which traces the reception of classical antiquity in children’s and young adults’ culture.  I am writing a Guide to the field of recent children’s literature inspired by classical antiquity.

MemberAlison Traweek

I am a sixth generation Texan, though I have now officially lived half of my life outside of Texas. Pennsylvania seems to have accepted me, though, and I at least think it’s going reasonably well. Teaching and writing were all I ever wanted to do for a living, and, fortunately, I have found a few people willing to pay me for the former and a few people willing to give me some white space for the latter. For six years I combined my interests by teaching writing at the University of Pennsylvania, which was both stimulating and fun. In that program I designed and taught classes on everything from ancient magic to race in antiquity to the politics of belonging to fairy tales, and learned a great deal about pedagogy. After a surprising and exciting semester teaching Shakespeare in film at Temple University, I have recently returned firmly to the field of classical studies, and am teaching Greek, Latin, and classics courses at the University of Pennsylvania and at Temple. My research explores poetry and poetics in archaic and classical Greece, mythology, and reception. I am currently (and probably foolishly) working on two book projects: one is on the development and significance of the figure of the Gorgon in Greco-Roman literature and art, and the other is an annotated translation of the Iliad for readers new to the poem and unfamiliar with the tradition. I have also published and/or presented on Medusa, dreams in ancient literature, Homer, Greek tragedy, teaching classics through writing, and – stretching my expertise, but responsibly – women’s suffrage in America, for the Biographical Database of Militant Woman Suffragists. When I’m not working, I enjoy spending time with my husband, admiring my cats, and dancing – I began studying Middle Eastern dance in 2005, picked up ballet in 2012, and went up on pointe in 2015. Other hobbies include sewing, quilting, studying Russian, playing classical piano, traveling, and creative writing.

MemberCarol Atack

Post-doctoral research assistant, ‘Anachronism and Antiquity’ project, Faculty of Classics, University of Oxford, and non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellow, St Hugh’s College. Fellow (2019-20), Harvard Center for Hellenic Studies, Washington DC. Associate editor, Polis: the Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought Current research is focused on fourth-century BCE Greek political thought, especially temporality and change in Greek political thought and the dialogues of Plato. Current teaching includes lectures and classes for Sexuality and Gender in Greece and Rome, an upper-level course for students in Classics and Ancient History at the University of Oxford. I am the treasurer of the Women’s Classical Committee UK.

MemberThomas J. Nelson

Tom Nelson is a Research Fellow in Classics at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. In 2018, he completed his PhD at Trinity College, supervised by Professor Richard Hunter (‘Early Greek Indexicality: Markers of Allusion in Archaic Greek Poetry’). His thesis explores the so-called “Alexandrian footnote” and markers of intertextuality in Latin and Greek Literature, with a particular focus on archaic and classical Greek poetry. It examines the manner in which these poets self-consciously signalled their interactions with other texts and traditions. He completed the MSt in Greek and Latin Languages and Literature at the University of Oxford, writing a dissertation on the various analogies and allegories employed to conceptualise victories over the Galatians in Hellenistic Literature and Art. From 1 October 2018, he will be a Research Fellow in Classics at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. He has recently co-organised a conference on Hellenistic Poetry Beyond Callimachean Aesthetics, 1-3 September 2016 (http://www.castingoffshadows2016.co.uk/), and was also a member of the organising committee for the Cambridge AHRC DTP’s Conference on Time and Temporality, 14-16 September 2016. Teaching materials for his undergraduates is available at http://www.thomas-j-nelson.co.uk/teaching.html. He is very open to any kind of collaborative research and happy to be contacted about any ideas for collaboration, however preliminary.

MemberMartino Dibeltulo Concu

I am a historian of Buddhism. My expertise is in the study of Buddhism in China and Tibet in a trans-regional and trans-cultural frame, with a special emphasis on Buddhism in its classical and contemporary forms. My primary research areas include classical systems of scriptural interpretation and the history of Mahāyāna and Vajrayāna traditions in India, China, and Tibet. I have a strong foundation in the study of Asia in the fields of language and philology, but my research also draws on anthropology, history, cultural and postcolonial studies, and religious studies. My current projects fall into two main areas. The first is the study of the history and historiography of Chinese and Tibetan Buddhist relations. I focus in particular on Buddhist scriptures and Tibetan scholastic works as they were translated and interpreted by Chinese exegetes during the late imperial and Republican periods. The second area is the history of Buddhism in its encounter with European and American religious and philosophical formations. I am interested in the question of how the study of Buddhism influenced Enlightenment legacies and global thought during the modern age, specifically how the imagination of the Indian roots of Buddhism was shaped through global networks of knowledge and the modern forces of colonialism and nationalism in Asia. In addition, I translate works on the modern reception of Tibetan Buddhism in China. My current projects include the travelogue of a Chinese monk in Tibet during the age of the Thirteenth Dalai Lama, Fazun’s (1902-1980) Xiandai Xizang 現代西藏 (“Modern Tibet”), and the work of a “Chinese lama” drawing from the views of both Zen and rDzogs Chen, Fahai’s (1920-1991) Sheng conghe lai, si conghe qu 生從何來,死從何去 (“Life Begins After Death”). My teaching broadly reflects my research interests, including theory courses that examine the concepts of religion and magic, travel and place, scripture and practice across disciplinary boundaries, and thematic courses that engage classical works from both Chinese and Tibetan philosophical and religious traditions.