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MemberZanne Domoney-Lyttle

I am a Biblical Studies tutor in Theology & Religious Studies at the University of Glasgow. My research is based in comic book adaptations of biblical material, reception history of the Bible, Bible and literature, Bible and art, women in the Bible/women and the Bible, gender in the Hebrew Bible. I studied at the University of Glasgow for my undergraduate degree, graduating in 2013. I also attained my MTh (title: “Sequential Art in the Seventeenth Century: An Analysis of Wenceslaus Hollar’s Etchings of Genesis 12-24”) and most recently my PhD (title: “Drawing (non)Tradition: Matriarchs, Motherhood and the Presentation of Sacred Texts in “The Book of Genesis, Illustrated by R. Crumb”) from the University of Glasgow. In my first year as a biblical studies tutor, I have created and developed a new Honours-level course on Women and Gender in the Bible and the Ancient World, and I also teach biblical Hebrew language, an introduction to the Bible course, Texts & Cultures of the Bible, and Honours-level courses in Genesis, Wisdom Literature and Old Testament/Tanakh. I also co-run a Comics Reading Group at Glasgow which runs every fortnight (you can follow us on @gucomicsrg on twitter) and we have a weekly podcast which caters to both academic and non-academic audiences.

MemberMagdalena Diaz Araujo

Magdalena Díaz Araujo is Professor of Judaism and Early Christianity at the National University of La Rioja (Argentina), and Professor of History of Arts and Scenography at the National University of Cuyo (Argentina). She has been a Visiting Professor at the École Pratique des Hautes Études (2011, 2012, 2014), at the Regensburg Universität (2015), and at the Methodist University of Sao Paulo (2016). She obtained her PhD in History of Religions and Religious Anthropology (2012) at the Paris IV-Sorbonne University, with the Dissertation “The representation of the woman and the invention of the “sin of flesh” in the Greek Life of Adam and Eve”. Her research fields are Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity, Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha, Gender Studies, and Aesthetics. She has received several doctoral and postdoctoral grants from the Paris IV-Sorbonne University, the École Pratique des Hautes Études , the National University of Cuyo, and a scholarship from the Program Alban (European Union Program of High Level Scholarship for Latin America). She has lectured and presented papers in English, French, and Spanish in several international meetings (Germany, Hungary, England, Switzerland, Italy, France, Brazil, and Argentina). She is the author of various articles and reviews in international journals and collective work volumes. Recently, she has contributed to the volume Des oasis d’Égypte à la Route de la Soie – Hommage à Jean-Daniel Dubois, edited by Anna Van den Kerchove and Luciana Soares Santoprete (Brepols,2017), and she has participated with an essay in Early Jewish Writings in Context: Perspectives on Gender and Reception History, The Bible and Women: An Encyclopedia of Exegesis and Cultural History, edited by Marie-Theres Wacker and Eileen Schuller, published in four languages (Society of Biblical Literature Press / Kohlhammer / Editorial Verbo Divino / Il Pozzo di Giacobbe).

MemberAnna Dorofeeva

I’m the ZKS Barker Junior Research Fellow at Durham University. My research interests span the cultural and intellectual history of the early and high Middle Ages, with a particular focus on book history. My most recent research output has focused on the Physiologus and on the codicology of miscellany manuscripts. I’m currently working on secret writing and cryptography in Durham Priory Library manuscripts from the ninth to the sixteenth centuries, examining community identity, the social experience of secrecy, and the boundary between graphic symbol and written word. If you want to get in touch, drop me an email: anna [dot] dorofeeva [at] durham [dot] ac [dot] uk.

MemberJacqueline Vayntrub

Interests Hebrew Bible; wisdom literature; instruction transmission; biblical poetry and poetics; philology; the history of biblical scholarship. I founded the Philology in Hebrew Studies program unit, which I now co-chair with David Lambert, and chair the Hebrew Bible, History, and Archaeology program unit at the Society of Biblical Literature Annual Meeting. I am an editor of Studies in Cultural Contexts of the Bible, a new English, German, and French language monograph series with Brill. Together with David Lambert, Eva Mroczek, and Laura Quick, I run Renewed Philology, an international working group of scholars in biblical studies whose work reflects critically on the intellectual frameworks of the reader that are brought to bear in philological practice. Research My research focuses on the formation of the Hebrew Bible, its various genres and modes of discourse against the broader background of ancient Near Eastern literary production, and its reception in and impact on Western scholarship. Broadly, my work seeks to recover the values of ancient literary culture through the language of the texts and examines how these values were reshaped in their reception. On my first book: “Central to understanding the prophecy and prayer of the Hebrew Bible are the unspoken assumptions that shaped them–their genres. Modern scholars describe these works as ‘poetry,’ but there was no corresponding ancient Hebrew term or concept. Scholars also typically assume it began as “oral literature,” a concept based more in evolutionist assumptions than evidence. Is biblical poetry a purely modern fiction or is there a more fundamental reason why its definition escapes us? Beyond Orality: Biblical Poetry on its Own Terms changes the debate by showing how biblical poetry has worked as a mirror, reflecting each era’s own self-image of verbal art. Yet Vayntrub also shows that this problem is rooted in a crucial pattern within the Bible itself: the texts we recognize as “poetry” are framed as powerful and ancient verbal performances, dramatic speeches from the past. The Bible’s creators presented what we call poetry in terms of their own image of the ancient and the oral, and understanding their native theories of Hebrew verbal art gives us a new basis to rethink our own.” See the book on the Routledge page. A special offer of the book at the Yale Divinity School Bookstore can be found here. My next book is currently underway. Reframing Biblical Poetry (under contract with Yale University Press in the Anchor Bible Reference Library series), takes the central insight of my first book—that poetry’s narrative and non-narrative frames shape its meaning—to present fresh readings of well known texts. The book has three sections, where I will explore how poetry is framed by narrative, in character voices; how poetry is arranged in anthology, not in a character’s voice, but by the names and personages of legendary characters; and how some of these ideas manifest as literary features. Yet another project involves theorizing  knowledge transmission and its gendered dimensions through the lens of human mortality. For what will eventually be a book, tentatively titled Seeking Eternity: Transmission and Mortal Anxiety in Biblical Literature, I have already produced a number of essays examining the depiction of lineage and succession as strategies for transcending individual death in wisdom and narrative texts. One article forthcoming in the Pardee Festschrift, entitled “Transmission and Mortal Anxiety in the Tale of Aqhat,” shows how the Ugaritic tale of Aqhat constructs a father-daughter alternative to succession. A second forthcoming essay in a collected volume, “Ecclesiastes and The Problem of Transmission in Biblical Literature,” examines Ecclesiastes against ancient Near Eastern instruction and Platonic dialogues, recovering an ancient question about the stability of transmission: Is speech reliable when it is detached from the living speaker’s voice? A third essay, forthcoming in a volume on Ben Sira, “Wisdom in Transmission: Rethinking Ben Sira and Proverbs,” re-examines the evolutionary framework in the study of biblical wisdom literature, and presents an alternative framework, in which instruction can be read as a discourse of trans-generational survival. A fourth essay, “Like Father, Like Son: Theorizing Transmission in Biblical Literature,” forthcoming in an issue of the journal Hebrew Bible Ancient Israel, considers how literary techniques such as “command and fulfillment” manifest broader social and intellectual values and can give us hints as to what biblical authors understood by “transmission” in their depiction of the passage of objects, responsibility, instruction, and text from one generation to the next. These inquiries also intellectually situate the text editions I am currently producing with Matthew Suriano for the SBL Writings of the Ancient World Series, Hebrew and Aramaic Writings about the Dead from Judah and Judea: Eighth cent. BCE through First cent. BCE.

MemberAlison Joseph

Alison Joseph is an adjunct assistant professor of Bible and its Interpretation at The Jewish Theological Seminary and Senior Editor of The Posen Library. She is a recipient of the 2016 Manfred Lautenschlaeger Award for Theological Promise, for her first book Portrait of the Kings: The Davidic Prototype in Deuteronomistic Poetics. She has previously taught at Swarthmore College, Towson University, Villanova University, Haverford College,  and Ursinus College.

MemberDaniel Pioske

Dan Pioske is an Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Georgia Southern University where he teaches in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies. His first book, “David’s Jerusalem: Between Memory and History,” was published by Routledge in 2015, and his second book, “Memory in a Time of Prose: Studies in Epistemology, Hebrew Scribalism, and the Biblical Past,” was published by Oxford in 2018. His research centers on the relationship between archaeology and the biblical writings, the history of ancient Israel, and how we read the Bible in the 21st century. He lives in Savannah, Georgia, with his wife Suzette and their two daughters, Eve and Esther.