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MemberNicholas T Rinehart

I am currently a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Society of Fellows and Lecturer in the Department of English and Creative Writing at Dartmouth College, where I am also affiliated with the Comparative Slavery Studies group. My research and teaching focus broadly on Black literature in the Americas and the comparative history of Atlantic slavery. I’m also interested in translation studies, philosophy of history, and queer studies. My scholarly writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Callaloo, Journal of Social History, Journal of American Studies, MELUS, and Winterthur Portfolio, with additional essays in the Dictionary of Caribbean and Afro-Latin American Biography (Oxford UP) and Cambridge Companion to Richard Wright (2019). My public-facing writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Transition: Magazine of Africa and the Diaspora, ReVista: Harvard Review of Latin America, Public Books, and Los Angeles Review of Books. I’m also a co-editor, along with Wai Chee Dimock et al., of American Literature in the World: An Anthology from Anne Bradstreet to Octavia Butler (Columbia UP, 2017).   My first book project, The Event of Witness: Slave Testimony and Social Practice, charts an alternative cartography of enslaved testimonial expression. Studies of the Anglo-American slave narrative tradition, as well as theories of testimony derived from psychoanalysis and trauma theory, overwhelmingly privilege autobiographical accounts that describe traumatic experience through recollective narration. The Event of Witness investigates Afro-Atlantic testimonial forms that diverge from these established norms. By centering hemispheric, multilingual archives of slave testimony that do not render past “experience,” The Event of Witness draws on feminist and queer theory to reveal how enslaved mystics, correspondents, poets, and storytellers, among others, produced testimony as a mode of mutual witness. The book thus frames slave testimony not as a site of memory but as a worldmaking practice—a way of imagining and enacting forms of social life beyond those imposed by regimes of enslavement and their afterlives.   I received my Ph.D. in English, with a secondary field in African and African American Studies, from Harvard University in 2019. In the English Department, I served as Lead Coordinator for Graduate Colloquia and founder/co-coordinator of the Race & Ethnicity Graduate Colloquium. I was also an affiliate of the Afro-Latin American Research Institute at the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research, and a member of the Tutorial Board in the Department of Comparative Literature.

MemberDeLisa Hawkes

My research focuses on representations of genealogical discovery and ancestry in nineteenth and early-twentieth century African American literature. I am especially interested in the literary depictions of the interactions between African Americans and Native Americans during the nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries, as well as intraracial tensions more broadly. I am currently working on my first book project which I developed out my dissertation entitled The Problem of the Prism: Racial Passing, Colorism, and the Politics of Racial Visibility. In this project, I analyze the works of authors such as Sutton Griggs and popular media like Ebony magazine to examine how authors and writers discussed genealogy in relation to Black pride.

MemberSummer Kim Lee

Summer Kim Lee is an Assistant Professor of English at UCLA. She holds a PhD in Performance Studies from New York University. She has research and teaching interests in critical race and ethnic studies, feminist theory, queer theory, and Asian American literature and culture. She is co-editor of a special issue of Women & Performance: a journal of feminist theory titled, “Performances of Contingency: Feminist Relationality and Asian American Studies After the Institution.” She has published and forthcoming work in Social Text, ASAP/Journal, the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Asian American and Pacific Islander Literature and Culture, Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas, GLQ,  Post45, Los Angeles Review of Books, and Public Books.

MemberMaria Seger

I’m an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. My research and teaching interests include early and nineteenth-century US literature, African American literature, US ethnic literatures, and critical race and ethnic studies. As a literary and cultural studies scholar, I am broadly interested in the violence of racial capitalism in US literature and culture. My work primarily deals with how violence arises out of and impacts capitalist social relations and ideological production, especially as it relates to notions of selfhood, ownership, and state power across the long nineteenth century. Right now, I’m at work on my book project, At All Costs: Extralegal Violence and Liberal Democracy in US Culture, which examines extralegal violence not as a lawless force that threatened American liberal-democratic governance but instead as emerging from and further entrenching the conditions that governance set.

MemberRocío Quispe-Agnoli

A native from Perú, Rocío Quispe-Agnoli is Professor of  Hispanic Studies with a specialization in Colonial Latin American Literatures and Cultures in the Department of Romance and Classical Studies at Michigan State University (MSU). She is a core faculty member for the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies and affiliated faculty in the American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program and the Program of Global Studies in the Arts and Humanities. Since January 2020, she is the Editor in Chief of REGS/Journal of Gender and Sexuality Studies, sponsored by Romance and Classical Studies and the College of Arts & Letters. Her research interests include issues of race, ethnicity, and identity, women’s and gender studies, visual studies and circulation of images among different media, Indigenous photographers, reflections on coloniality, and television and telenovela studies. Rocío Quispe-Agnoli is also a creative writer and has published a book of short stories. Her short fiction has earned her several awards. She is also an amateur photographer and won the 2011 MSU Global Focus Competition-People’s Choice Award. Every four years, she avidly follows the Soccer World Cup. Areas of interest: Colonial Latin American Studies, Interdisciplinary studies, Digital Humanities, Digital Pedagogy, Visual Studies, Television Studies, Studies of Dispersion and Randomness-Postmodern condition, Science Fiction, Dark Fantasy, Postcolonial Studies and Studies of Subalternity, Indigeneity, Gender, Oral/Written, Identity and Otherness.

MemberMarinela Golemi

Marinela Golemi is a PhD Candidate in English Literature at Arizona State University focusing on early modern drama. She was born in Albania, and grew up in Greece, but it was in Boston, MA where she discovered her passion for English literature. Her dissertation research has connected her back to those roots as she explores how Shakespeare has been appropriated in Albanian performances through the racialized and gendered rhetoric of translations. Her other research interests include global/glocal Shakespeares, bodies and early modern fashion, animal studies, and female power and agency in the early modern period. 

MemberMaria A. Dikcis, PhD

Maria Dikcis received her PhD in English from Northwestern University. She specializes in 20th- and 21st-century poetry and poetics, with research and teaching interests in Latinx, African American, and Asian American literatures, critical race studies, media aesthetics, and critical prison studies. Maria is currently a Continuing Studies Instructor at Northwestern and she serves as the Director of the Cook County Jail Partnership for the Northwestern Prison Education Program. Her full cv can be found at http://www.mariadikcis.com.

MemberBeverly Weber

Beverly Weber’s research and teaching interests include the intersections of race, gender, and migration in Germany and Europe; comparative studies of racialization; digital activism; contemporary visual cultures; contemporary German literature and culture; and Islam in Europe.  Her interdisciplinary work is informed by transnational feminist cultural studies frameworks, with a current focus on theories of precarity and intimacy; and incorporates analysis of popular media, literature, and film. Her first book, Violence and Gender in the “New” Europe: Islam in German Culture, examines how current thinking about Islam and gender violence prohibits the intellectual inquiry necessary to act against a range of forms of violence. It then analyzes ways in which Muslim women participate in the public sphere by thematizing violence in literature, art, and popular media. Precarious Intimacies: The Politics of Touch in Contemporary European Cinema, co-authored with Maria Stehle, examines representations of intimacy and Europeanness in contemporary film. The book proposes the notion of “precarious intimacies” to navigate a dilemma: how to recognize, affirm, and value love, touch, and care while challenging the racialized and gendered politics in which they are embedded. Her current book project, Decolonizing Hospitality, Re-Imagining Home: Cohabitation, Race, and Contemporary Refugee Migration, draws on three distinct theoretical traditions on hospitality (Jewish intellectual traditions, Latin American studies theorizations of decoloniality, and Indigenous Studies discussions of decolonization as well as hospitality). Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:”Calibri”,sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} I consider the debates about ethical homes and living together raised by the ongoing rise in refugee migration, and look to the cultural production of refugees for new forms of hospitality and cohabitation. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:”Calibri”,sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

MemberAlmas Khan

As an intellectual historian, I analyze how modernism in American law and literature has shaped the quest for equal citizenship. Drawing on my Ph.D. in English and my J.D. with a focus on constitutional history, I interrogate how creative forms of legal dissent – ranging from judicial opinions to lyric poems – have sparked constitutional reimagination in the context of African American, working-class, and women’s experiences. My current book project, An Intellectual Reconstruction: American Legal Realism, Literary Realism, and the Formation of Citizenship, construes legal realism (a progenitor of critical race theory) and literary realism as a major post-Civil War movements connecting disciplinary critiques to equitist politics. I have additional interests in British literary modernism and postcolonial studies, having composed articles on Joseph Conrad’s and Virginia Woolf’s texts. My literary and legal scholarship has been published in several anthologies and journals, including Critical Insights: Social Justice and American Literature; Critical Insights: Inequality; Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History; the Cambridge Journal of Postcolonial Literary Inquiry; and the Chicago Journal of International Law. Recent articles include “Black Lives Matter and Legal Reconstructions of Elegiac Forms” and “Applied Legal Storytelling: Toward a Stylistics of Embodiment.” I have also published widely on writing studies pedagogy through the lens of critical theory, drawing on extensive experiences teaching literature, law, and composition. My pedagogical scholarship has appeared in the Washburn Law JournalPerspectives: Teaching Legal Research & WritingThe Law Teacher, and the anthology Writing as a Way of Staying Human in a Time that Isn’t. When not immersed in literature, law, history, and philosophy, I explore modernist-inflected alternative music, fashion, interior design, landscapes, gardens, and other aesthetic phenomena suiting my fancy.

MemberYomaira Figueroa

Ethnic Studies, Literature, Caribbean Studies, Afro-Hispanic, Afro-Latino Studies, U.S. Afro-Latino Cultural Studies, Decolonial Thought, Latino/as in the U.S., U.S. Multi-Ethnic Literatures, Transatlantic Studies. Hispano-African Literature, Caribbean Literature, Equatorial Guinean literature, Transatlantic Literature, Africana Studies, Critical Race and Ethnic Studies;