Search

DepositPunk and the city: A history of punk in Bandung

Punk in Indonesia has often been described as a spectacular performance of disorder and resistance, a youthful style that posed a disruptive challenge to the authoritarian hierarchy and discipline of the New Order regime. The punk scene in Bandung has developed in the context of what is often referred to as ‘post-authoritarian’ Indonesia. Punk gives another historical narrative of the development of urban communities, and, while remaining a minority, is highly visible among urban Indonesian youth lifestyles. This article describes the history of punk’s growth and development in Bandung, traced through its relationship to space and place, and through the variety of artefacts it produces such as zines, cassettes and posters. This production and consumption is informed by punk’s traditional DIY ethos, and forms the basis for transnational cultural and political relationships.

DepositKen Works : How Indonesian (Punk) Ilustrator Open the World

Illustration as part of art works has often been considered a form of low art, but as it has progressively become more developed, it has established a decent place in the art community. This paper focuses on how Indonesian punk artist succeed expanding the art of illustration in Indonesia as well as building local and global networking through the art of illustration, with Kenterror as a role model. He did well in elaborating his punk identity and everyday issues (social, politics, and economy) either local or global scale, and then transform these subjectivities through his own imagination into the art of illustration. Authors will discuss the early development of Indonesian illustration, the pressures that compelled Indonesian illustrators to move on, and the influence of punk.

DepositSlow Archaeology, Punk Archaeology, and the Archaeology of Care

This article considers the impact of both historical and digital transhuman practices in archaeology with an eye toward recent conversations concerning punk archaeology, slow archaeology, and an archaeology of care. Drawing on Ivan Illich, Jacques Ellul, and Gilles Delueze, the article suggests that current trends in digital practices risk both alienating archaeological labour and deterritorializing archaeological work.

DepositIndonesian Illustration Open the World: Challenge for Underground (Punk) Illustrator of Indonesia

Illustration as part of art works has often been considered a form of low art, but as it has progressively become more developed, it has established a decent place in the art community. Through this paper, the authors have tried to apply a primarily participatory research method, including participant observation, deep interview, and literature studies to prove that statement. This paper focuses on how Indonesian punk artist succeed expanding the art of illustration in Indonesia as well as building local and global networking through the art of illustration, with Kenterror as a role model. He did well in elaborating his punk identity and everyday issues (social, politics, and economy) either local or global scale, and then transform these subjectivities through his own imagination into the art of illustration. As a consequence, he is not only able to share his works to the public and being appreciated, but also able to shift people opinion about illustration, Indonesian artists in particular, which was known as low art becoming more valuable art. Furthermore, he can also build local and global networking as well as internationally acknowledged as a competent illustrator.In this paper, the authors will describe Kenterror’s life and his commitment to build networking in Indonesia and other countries through his works. The first section of this paper, the authors will discuss the early development of Indonesian illustration, the pressures that compelled Indonesian illustrators to move on, and the influence of punk. Then, the next section will describe Kenterror’s life history, his work in local (Indonesia) and global (international) scope which influenced by his identity as a punk. Finally, this paper will discuss what made Kenterror’s works become so highly appreciated worldwide, and what other Indonesian illustrators can do to improve the quality and global position of Indonesian illustration.

MemberValentina DENZEL

…ok chapters
1.       “Sadean Confessions in Virginie Despentes’s Punk-Porn-Feminism.” editors Thomas Waugh and Brandon Arroyo for a peer-review…

  Valentina Denzel is an Associate Professor of French Literature (17th and 18th century) at the Department of Romance and Classical Studies at Michigan State University. Her fields of interest are Italian and French Literatures (15th – 18th century), Queer and Gender Studies, Querelle des femmes, the libertine novel, travelogues, and popular cultures. In her book Les mille et un visages de la virago. Marfisa et Bradamante entre continuation et variation, Garnier Classique 2016, she analyzes the evolution of the representation of the woman warrior in French and Italian literatures from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment by taking into consideration the political and historical context of this evolution and the symbolic value of the woman warrior in each specific time period. Valentina’s second book project examines the impact of the Marquis de Sade on the punk and post-punk movements, as well as on punk-porn feminism and comic books in France, the UK, and the US.  

DepositAnarchy for the UK

De Larrabeiti’s Borribles children’s/young adult fantasy trilogy was written and published between 1976 and 1986, a period of huge political, social and economic change in the UK. Set in London, it tells the story of Borribles, a group of children who have had a ‘bad start’ in life and become Borrible; ‘wild’ children with pointed ears who can never grow up. They squat in abandoned buildings and live by their wits, while the police and other adults seek to destroy their communal, anti-capitalist ways of life. In the early 1980s the UK punk movement evolved into the football fan/ skinhead Oi movement, Goth, indie and the more political anarchist punk movement of such bands as Crass, Hagar the Womb and the Poison Girls, coming out of communes, squats and protests against the miners’ strike, the Falklands and the anti-police riots. Songs such as Crass’s ‘Sheep Farming in the Falklands’ and Hagar the Womb’s ‘Dressed to Kill’ commented on international politics, social structures and economics of the time. The movement was broadly anti-consumerist and anti-capitalist. The Borribles sing songs to celebrate victories and as exhortions to action, as well as to comment on the action, in the style of Bertholt Brecht’s Verfremdungseffekt; while Tolkien used it in his epic quest fantasies, they can alienate the reader in a mimetic depiction of London; as I state in a previous presentation , The Borribles (1976) is an epic quest across London with geographical and mythical beast hazards replaced by urban features. While I will not argue that Michael de Larrabeiti was influenced by, or was an influence on, the punk movement, their shared political concerns and anger provide an additional context to the trilogy. I will take a new historicist approach to discuss punk and The Borribles as political responses to the Thatcher government of the 1980s and contemporary cultural concerns.

Deposit“(Ac)cumulative Form in Pop-Rock Music.”

This article examines a variety of compositional procedures that give rise to what the author defines as “accumulative” and “cumulative” forms in pop-rock music, formal processes which are directly linked to the rapid advances in recording technology that occurred mainly from the late 1960s to the 1980s. The article includes detailed transcriptions and analyses of pop-rock music across a wide range of styles and genres, from progressive rock to post-punk to techno.