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DepositPunk and the city: A history of punk in Bandung

Punk in Indonesia has often been described as a spectacular performance of disorder and resistance, a youthful style that posed a disruptive challenge to the authoritarian hierarchy and discipline of the New Order regime. The punk scene in Bandung has developed in the context of what is often referred to as ‘post-authoritarian’ Indonesia. Punk gives another historical narrative of the development of urban communities, and, while remaining a minority, is highly visible among urban Indonesian youth lifestyles. This article describes the history of punk’s growth and development in Bandung, traced through its relationship to space and place, and through the variety of artefacts it produces such as zines, cassettes and posters. This production and consumption is informed by punk’s traditional DIY ethos, and forms the basis for transnational cultural and political relationships.

DepositSlow Archaeology, Punk Archaeology, and the Archaeology of Care

This article considers the impact of both historical and digital transhuman practices in archaeology with an eye toward recent conversations concerning punk archaeology, slow archaeology, and an archaeology of care. Drawing on Ivan Illich, Jacques Ellul, and Gilles Delueze, the article suggests that current trends in digital practices risk both alienating archaeological labour and deterritorializing archaeological work.

DepositIndonesian Illustration Open the World: Challenge for Underground (Punk) Illustrator of Indonesia

Illustration as part of art works has often been considered a form of low art, but as it has progressively become more developed, it has established a decent place in the art community. Through this paper, the authors have tried to apply a primarily participatory research method, including participant observation, deep interview, and literature studies to prove that statement. This paper focuses on how Indonesian punk artist succeed expanding the art of illustration in Indonesia as well as building local and global networking through the art of illustration, with Kenterror as a role model. He did well in elaborating his punk identity and everyday issues (social, politics, and economy) either local or global scale, and then transform these subjectivities through his own imagination into the art of illustration. As a consequence, he is not only able to share his works to the public and being appreciated, but also able to shift people opinion about illustration, Indonesian artists in particular, which was known as low art becoming more valuable art. Furthermore, he can also build local and global networking as well as internationally acknowledged as a competent illustrator.In this paper, the authors will describe Kenterror’s life and his commitment to build networking in Indonesia and other countries through his works. The first section of this paper, the authors will discuss the early development of Indonesian illustration, the pressures that compelled Indonesian illustrators to move on, and the influence of punk. Then, the next section will describe Kenterror’s life history, his work in local (Indonesia) and global (international) scope which influenced by his identity as a punk. Finally, this paper will discuss what made Kenterror’s works become so highly appreciated worldwide, and what other Indonesian illustrators can do to improve the quality and global position of Indonesian illustration.

DepositAnarchy for the UK

De Larrabeiti’s Borribles children’s/young adult fantasy trilogy was written and published between 1976 and 1986, a period of huge political, social and economic change in the UK. Set in London, it tells the story of Borribles, a group of children who have had a ‘bad start’ in life and become Borrible; ‘wild’ children with pointed ears who can never grow up. They squat in abandoned buildings and live by their wits, while the police and other adults seek to destroy their communal, anti-capitalist ways of life. In the early 1980s the UK punk movement evolved into the football fan/ skinhead Oi movement, Goth, indie and the more political anarchist punk movement of such bands as Crass, Hagar the Womb and the Poison Girls, coming out of communes, squats and protests against the miners’ strike, the Falklands and the anti-police riots. Songs such as Crass’s ‘Sheep Farming in the Falklands’ and Hagar the Womb’s ‘Dressed to Kill’ commented on international politics, social structures and economics of the time. The movement was broadly anti-consumerist and anti-capitalist. The Borribles sing songs to celebrate victories and as exhortions to action, as well as to comment on the action, in the style of Bertholt Brecht’s Verfremdungseffekt; while Tolkien used it in his epic quest fantasies, they can alienate the reader in a mimetic depiction of London; as I state in a previous presentation , The Borribles (1976) is an epic quest across London with geographical and mythical beast hazards replaced by urban features. While I will not argue that Michael de Larrabeiti was influenced by, or was an influence on, the punk movement, their shared political concerns and anger provide an additional context to the trilogy. I will take a new historicist approach to discuss punk and The Borribles as political responses to the Thatcher government of the 1980s and contemporary cultural concerns.

Deposit‘Hand in Glove’ and the Development of The Smiths’ Sound

The Smiths are one of the most commercially successful and in uential bands to emerge from the British post-punk movement in the 1980s. Along with elements such as lyrics, harmony, and musical form, a key component of The Smiths’ distinctive musical style involves their sound and, in particular, their sound as represented on studio recordings. Drawing upon the work and insights of scholars such as Albin Zak, Allan F. Moore and Ruth Dockwray, this paper details the complex recording history of the band’s rst single ‘Hand in Glove’ in an attempt to trace the development of The Smiths’ unique recorded sound.

MemberMatthew Bokovoy

I am senior acquiring editor in the fields of Native American and Indigenous Studies, Cultural Anthropology and Ethnography, History of Anthropology, Non-fiction of the American West, and Literary Memoir of the American West. I conceived the major, social science documentary project, The Franz Boas Papers: Documentary Edition (25 vols.) with my colleagues at University of Nebraska Press, Regna Darnell of University of Western Ontario, and Martin Levitt of American Philosophical Society, funded by $2.5 million CAD from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada. I am an American and European historian (PhD, Temple University, 1999) in intellectual, social, and cultural history of the 19th and 20th Century that writes about urban history, architecture and urban planning, historical memory, anthropological race theory, history of science, intellectuals and war, and California and US Southwest history. My work has been published in scholarly journals such as the Journal of the American Planning Association, Reviews in American History, AHA Perspectives, and the New Mexico Historical Review. I am author of The San Diego World’s Fairs and Southwestern Memory, 1880-1940 (University of New Mexico Press, 2005), a finalist for the San Diego Book Award. My reviews have been published in American Historical Review, Journal of American History, Journal of Religion, Journal of American Ethnic History, Pacific Historical Review, Western American Literature, Western Historical Quarterly, and New Mexico Historical Review. I am currently working on a new book, entitled “Manic-Depressive Illness: An Intellectual History of Bipolar Disorder from Hippocrates to Biological Psychiatry.” I play lead guitar in Red Cities (Lincoln, NE), a garage punk band on Modern Peasant Records. The Big Takeover Magazine said: “On breakneck blasters like ‘Worker Song’ and ‘Come Now Baby,’ Red Cities’ unashamedly summon slashing ‘Search and Destroy’ simulating riffs – tension-building, jet engine-explosive punk that exhilarates.” I am also a producer for Modern Peasant Records, having sponsored The Sinners’ Drunk on the Lord’s Day (MPR-013) and John Wayne’s Bitches’ Bitched Out (MPR-011). I blog about the history of punk rock, hardcore, and indy rock at the music podcast Doc Rockavoy’s Indy Music Garage.

DepositAfter the Canon: Developing Divergent Music Collections at UCLA

n libraries, where there is neither the money nor space to purchase and store everything published, canons were deemed “essential” or “core” and drove collection development efforts. However, music pedagogy and scholarship have been moving away from canons, as scholars increasingly seek to diversify both within the traditional domain of European Art Music (by looking at women, minorities, queer studies, music of the Americas, etc.) and without (by including jazz, popular music, and non-Western traditions). Furthermore, canons are becoming less relevant as pedagogy shifts from focusing on what students “need to know” to concentrate instead on methodological tools and critical thinking skills for students to use while approaching a broader array of topics and repertoire. The challenge then, for libraries, is how to support these changes in music pedagogy and scholarship given the fiscal and spatial constraints that libraries often face. In this presentation, we will share various ways the UCLA Music Library is responding to these challenges and how we are actively moving our collections and services beyond the traditional canon. We have refocused collection development on local music, picking particular areas and diving deep. For example, we have started collections focusing on local punk, and hip hop. Punk and hip hop have strong roots in the local music scenes, and in addition to being areas of interest to the scholars at our institution, they tend to be areas that are less documented and represented in cultural institutions. Another strategy has been to uncover and highlight existing unique collections within our larger collection, such as the scores from the Federal Music Project, which formed the start of our library, and scores from the former Soviet Union. In the presentation we will discuss our approach in more detail, share our efforts to make these collections more discoverable and prominent, and encourage the coordination for developing local collections.

DepositAfter the Canon: Developing Divergent and Local Music Collections at UCLA (Best of Chapters)

In libraries, where there is neither the money nor space to purchase and store everything published, canons were deemed “essential” or “core” and drove collection development efforts. However, music pedagogy and scholarship have been moving away from canons, as scholars increasingly seek to diversify both within the traditional domain of European Art Music (by looking at women, minorities, queer studies, music of the Americas, etc.) and without (by including jazz, popular music, and non-Western traditions). Furthermore, canons are becoming less relevant as pedagogy shifts from focusing on what students “need to know” to concentrate instead on methodological tools and critical thinking skills for students to use while approaching a broader array of topics and repertoire. The challenge then, for libraries, is how to support these changes in music pedagogy and scholarship given the fiscal and spatial constraints that libraries often face. In this presentation, we will share various ways the UCLA Music Library is responding to these challenges and how we are actively moving our collections and services beyond the traditional canon. We have refocused collection development on local music, picking particular areas and diving deep. For example, we have started collections focusing on local punk, and hip hop. Punk and hip hop have strong roots in the local music scenes, and in addition to being areas of interest to the scholars at our institution, they tend to be areas that are less documented and represented in cultural institutions. Another strategy has been to uncover and highlight existing unique collections within our larger collection, such as the scores from the Federal Music Project, which formed the start of our library, and scores from the former Soviet Union. In the presentation we will discuss our approach in more detail, share our efforts to make these collections more discoverable and prominent, and encourage the coordination for developing local collections.

MemberAndrew John Hodges

I am a social and linguistic anthropologist interested in the anthropology of work and leisure. My current project examines the impact of a shipyard (Uljanik, Pula) on work, leisure and sub-cultural activities (especially on fan and punk subcultures) in and around the city of Pula. I have also written extensively on football fans in Zagreb Croatia, interpreting their engagements as subculture and social movement. To date I have written about left wing/antifascist fan initiatives (White Angels Zagreb), and progressive initiatives among GNK Dinamo Zagreb’s Bad Blue Boys. I have just completed a book on this research.  I have also written on Croatian minority (language) activism in Vojvodina, Serbia and the politics of academic networks in Croatia and Serbia.   Please feel free to contact me by email if you have any questions about my work. Email: hodges (at) ios-regensburg.de