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MemberJames Daniel Elam

Rhetoric and Public Culture Program/Asian American Studies Program, Northwestern UniversityI write about Indian anticolonialism, print culture, modernism, and transnationalism between World War I and World War II. I currently teach South Asian/South Asian American literature and literatures of Afro-Asian Solidarity.I have written about Dhan Gopal Mukerji, W.E.B. DuBois, Bhagat Singh, Emma Goldman, and Lala Har Dayal.jdelam@u.northwestern.edu

MemberNouri Gana

Nouri Gana is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature & Near Eastern Languages and Cultures at the University of California, Los Angeles. He published numerous articles and chapters on the literatures and cultures of the Arab world and its diasporas in such scholarly venues as Comparative Literature Studies, PMLA, Public Culture and Social Text. He also contributed op-eds to such magazines and international newspapers as The Guardian, El Pais, The Electronic Intifada, Jadaliyya and CounterPunch. Author of Signifying Loss: Towards a Poetics of Narrative Mourning (Bucknell UP, 2011), he is currently completing a book manuscript on the politics of melancholia in the Arab world and another on the cultural politics of the Tunisia revolution. In addition, he is the editor of The Tunisian Revolution: Contexts, Architects, Prospects and of The Edinburgh Companion to the Arab Novel in English (Edinburgh UP, 2013)

MemberBruce O'Neill

Bruce O’Neill is an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology and in the Center for Intercultural Studies at Saint Louis Unviersity. His ethnographic research explores the social and spatial dimensions of urban inequality, particularly in Bucharest, Romania, where he has conducted fieldwork since 2006. Professor O’Neill’s first book, The Space of Boredom: Homelessness in the Slowing Global Order (Duke University Press, 2017) uses boredom as a window into the cultural politics of displacement from the global economy. His next book project, The Roots of Urbanism, is an ethnography of subterranean Bucharest. With support from the Wenner Gren Foundation, the fieldwork examines the way post-socialist urban life unfolds underground in Metro stations, basements, and cemeteries, for example. Professor O’Neill’s research appears in such journals as Public Culture (27:2), Cultural Anthropology (29:1), Environment and Planning D (28:2), and a special issue of Ethnography (13:4), which he co-edited.