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MemberYevgenya Strakovsky

Research Focus:
The long 19th Century (Romanticism, Realism, High Modernism),
Education and the Individual (The Bildungsroman, autonomy, agency, citizenship, personality, character development)Methodological Interests/Interdisciplinary Ties:
Translation Studies,
History of Visual Arts,
History of Music,
Cognitive Approaches to Literature,
Graphic Design and VisualizationProfessional Concerns:
Humanities in Higher Education,
Public Outreach,
Arts Administration

MemberBurton Bargerstock

Burton A. Bargerstock is director of the National Collaborative for the Study of University Engagement, director of Communication and Information Technology, and special adviser to the Associate Provost for University Outreach and Engagement, Michigan State University. His work focuses on institutional culture and support strategies related to community-engaged scholarship and university outreach (e.g., research, professional development, policy advocacy, communication, etc.). He leads MSU’s Outreach and Engagement Measurement Instrument project, teaches in the MSU Graduate Certification in Community Engagement, and presents/publishes on themes related to community engagement and scholarship in higher education. Burton serves as an associate editor of the Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, for which he guest edited a 2012 issue; a section co-editor of the International Journal of Research on Service-learning and Community Engagement; a member of the editorial board of UNBOUND: Reinventing Higher Education; and senior co-editor of the Transformations in Higher Education: The Scholarship of Engagement book series (MSU Press). He also directs publication of MSU’s Engaged Scholar Magazine. In 2017, he was inducted into the Academy of Community Engagement Scholarship (ACES) and elected its president. Currently Burton is a member and former chairperson of the board of directors of the International Association for Research on Service-Learning and Community Engagement. He previously served on the executive committee of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities’ Council on Engagement and Outreach and board of directors of the University Professional and Continuing Education Association. Burton organized the Engagement Scholarship Consortium’s 2011 National Outreach Scholarship Conference and remains active with the organization. On campus, he is president of the MSU chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi.

MemberMichael Noble

I am interested in the deployment of academic and scientific expertise in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. My doctoral research explores how University College Nottingham responded to the crisis of the First World War and, in particular, how its research staff were recruited or volunteered to contribute their expertise to the war effort. The project examines two strands:

  • The effect of wartime conditions on the College. This strand includes assessments of the absence of male students and staff of military age, the financial implications of these absences and restructuring of the organisation in response.
  • The contribution made by the College to the national war effort. This includes the provision of specialised training courses for military recruits and munitions workers, the use of College buildings and equipment for war work and the contribution of the College’s specialist technical expertise to the war economy. It also includes an assessment of the relationship between the College (and individual researchers) and industrial organisations, such as Cammell Laird, Rolls-Royce and British Dyestuffs Ltd.

I set these effects and contributions in the context not only of the College’s trajectory of development but also of the wider changes in higher education and research in early twentieth century Britain. Project themes include the history of science, state-organised research, the history of education, the First World War, urban networks, technology and innovation.   I have expertise in university-public engagement, including the brokering and management of productive working relationships between researchers and non-university partners; the planning and delivery of outreach and engagement events, both on and off campus; development and administration of co-production research projects and research project management.   I am responsible for project management and community liaison for the Centre for Hidden Histories, an AHRC-funded First World War Engagement Centre. In this role I have administered over 25 co-production research projects, organised and delivered public outreach events across the UK and established a nationwide network of academic researchers and community leaders. I regularly run history education sessions for primary and secondary school pupils.   In 2016 I organised Beyond the Western Front: The Global First World War, a two-day conference that blended academic papers with a showcase of community group projects. I provide advice and consultation for academics and non-university partners interesting in collaboration and co-production.   I am the author of two non-fiction children’s books on historical topics: D-Day: 20 Real Life Stories of the Normandy Invasion (Quarto Kids, 2019) and The Secret Life of Spies (Quarto Kids, 2020)  

MemberDaniela Avido

I study Anthropology at the University of Buenos Aires (Argentina), where I have also volunteered as a student tutor. I am interested in computer assisted design and its application in archaeological research and outreach, as the three-dimensional reconstruction of findings and excavation surfaces. I work in the Historical Museum of La Matanza (Buenos Aires Province, Argentina) as an assistant technician. Besides surveying the museum backyard, I engage in outreach activities and also perform as a guide for the Pleistocene-megafauna exhibition. My current research topics are related to historical artifacts, from glassware to floor tiles, collected both in the Museum backyard and La Elvira site (see my publications), and also the prehispanic pottery technology found in La Matanza river shores (unpublished).

MemberTodd Barnes

Todd Landon Barnes is Associate Professor of Literature at Ramapo College of New Jersey. His essays and reviews have appeared in Shakespeare Bulletin, Public Books, Renaissance Quarterly (forthcoming), Weyward Macbeth: Intersections of Race and Performance, Shakespearean Echoes, Hamlet Handbook: Subject Matter, Adaptations, Interpretations, and Julius Caesar: A Critical Reader, part of the Arden Shakespeare’s Early Modern Drama Guides series. Barnes has served as dramaturg for the African-American Shakespeare Company in San Francisco, where he also worked in educational outreach. He is currently completing a monograph on Shakespeare, performance, and neoliberalism. He serves on the editorial board for Cambridge University Press’s forthcoming Elements: Shakespeare Performance series.

MemberAysha W. Musa

Aysha W. Musa is a fully funded fourth year PhD student with the Sheffield Institute for Interdisciplinary Biblical Studies (SIIBS) and the School of English Literature at the University of Sheffield. She is working in the field of Gender and the Bible, focusing on Jael’s performances of gender in Judges 4 and 5. Aysha is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA) and is currently a coordinator for the Sheffield Gender History Group and an Academic Tutor for the Realising Opportunities outreach programme.

MemberUlrike Wuttke

Ulrike Wuttke (Doctor of Literature, Universiteit Gent 2012) is a medievalist and textual scholar by training with a specialisation in Medieval Dutch Literature and active in medieval eschatology, historiography, and book and library history. She contributes to projects and networks in digital preservation and digital arts and humanities via groups such as the Working Group Data Centres of the Verband Digital Humanities im deutschsprachigen Raum (deputy convenor). She studied Dutch and English Philology at the Freie Universität Berlin and with a grant from the DAAD at the Universiteit van Amsterdam. She obtained her PhD from Universiteit Gent with a study on medieval Dutch eschatology. Since completing her PhD, she has worked in the context of Digital (Humanities) Research Infrastructures. She has been the Scientific Coordinator of the AGATE-project for the Union of the German Academies of Sciences and Humanities, worked for the Humanities Data Centre (HDC) for the Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities and the Göttingen eResearch Alliance (eRA) for the Göttingen State and University Library. In the context of both projects she was strongly involved in the general strategic development and especially in the development of services according to feedback from the community. She was also responsible for public relations, communication and outreach as well as for training and personal counselling on data management, open access and Digital Humanities. She joined the PARTHENOS project and University of Applied Sciences Potsdam (FH Potsdam) in April 2017.

MemberSpencer Keralis

Spencer D. C. Keralis is a scholar of the past, present, and future of the book. Dr. Keralis is the Founder and Executive Director of Digital Frontiers, a conference and community that brings together the makers and users of digital resources for humanities research, teaching, and learning. Founded in 2012, the conference celebrates it’s 8th anniversary at the University of Texas at Austin in September 2019. Dr. Keralis served as Research Associate Professor and Head of the Digital Humanities and Collaborative Programs Unit with the Public Services Division of the University of North Texas Libraries, leading efforts to catalyze digital scholarship and digital pedagogy for UNT faculty, staff, and students from 2012-2018. He is an adjunct instructor in the UNT Department of English, and has taught in the UNT i-School. He holds a Ph.D. in English & American Literature from New York University. His research has appeared in Book History, a special issue American Periodicals on children’s periodicals, and in the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) reports The Problem of Data (2012) and Research Data Management: Principles, Practices, and Prospects (2013). Dr. Keralis’s work on labor ethics in digital humanities pedagogy is forthcoming in Disrupting the Digital Humanities, and the Modern Language Association publication Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments. Dr. Keralis has held a Mellon Fellowship at the Library Company of Philadelphia, a Legacy Fellowship at the American Antiquarian Society, a Summer Residency at the Queer Zine Archive Project, and served as a CLIR Fellow in Academic Libraries with the University of North Texas Libraries. In 2017, he was honored with the Innovative Outreach Award for the Digital Frontiers project by the Texas Digital Library.

MemberStephanie J. Lahey

Stephanie J. Lahey is a SSHRC-funded PhD candidate at the University of Victoria, Canada, where she holds the Howard E. Petch Research Scholarship and a University of Victoria Fellowship. Her doctoral dissertation—a mixed-methodology, corpus-based study of the use of parchment ‘offcuts’ (low-quality byproducts of parchment manufacturing) in manuscripts produced in later medieval England—is jointly supervised by Dr. Iain Macleod Higgins (Victoria) and Dr. Erik Kwakkel (UBC iSchool). A recent Guest Researcher at Universiteit Leiden, she is the Editorial Assistant of Early Middle English, teaches at DHSI and at the University of Victoria, and serves on the Public Relations and Outreach Committee of the Canadian Society of Medievalists / Société canadienne des médiévistes. Her research interests include medieval codicology, palaeography, and manuscript production; parchment-manufacturing and use; medieval legal, technical, and reference literatures; quantitative and digital humanities; and public humanities.