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MemberFletcher Durant

Fletcher Durant is the Preservation Librarian at the University of Florida Smathers Libraries. His work focuses on the preventive conservation of library and archival materials, the sustainability of cultural heritage, and risk management. He is a trained book and paper conservator and a Professional Associate of the American Institute for Conservation. Prior to joining the University of Florida, he was the Preservation Archivist for NYU Libraries and an Assistant Conservator for Special Collection at the New York Public Library.

MemberAlexsandra Mitchell

Alexsandra Mitchell is a Brooklyn-based international research scholar whose work explores the African Diaspora, spirituality, and the arts. She presently serves as a reference librarian and an archivist at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library.  Prior to joining the staff here in the Manuscripts, Archives, and Rare Books Division, Alexsandra was a lecturer at New York University’s Gallatin School for Individualized Study, and worked with institutions such as National Geographic Television, The Library of Congress, The West African Research Center in Dakar, Senegal, The New York Historical Society, and The Weeksville Heritage Center in Brooklyn, New York. Her many fellowships and awards include a National Diversity in Libraries Conference travel award, The Academy Awards Documenting Cinema Film Librarians Conference travel award, and two University of Virginia’s Rare Book School scholarships. Alexsandra is curator of the Schomburg Center’s, “Live From the Reading Room: Correspondence” podcast series, ‘Live From the Archive’ programming series, and The Schomburg Center’s community archives program, ‘Everyday Archives’, and a first year doctoral student in Cornell University’s Africana Studies program. . She is co-author of Research Techniques and Strategies for the Study of Black Writings, Rowman & Littlefield and a contributor to Pushing the Margins: Women of Color and Intersectionality in Library and Information Science, both forthcoming.

MemberIsaac Maupin

Isaac Maupin is a fourth-year Ph.D. candidate in the University of Kentucky’s Ethnomusicology/Musicology program. Prior to attending the University of Kentucky, he attended Otterbein University where he received a Bachelor of Music in guitar performance in 2013. Following the completion of his undergraduate study, Isaac lived in Boston and performed in various rock ensembles. At UK, Isaac teaches undergraduate courses on the History of Jazz, Creativity and Innovation in Rock Music, and Music Appreciation. In addition to teaching, Isaac has performed in various ensembles at UK including jazz combos, Korean drumming, and the gamelan. In the summer of 2017, he worked as an intern in the archive of the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center. As an intern, Isaac assisted in the curation of two collections of jazz-related materials. Additionally, Isaac has research interest in the music of the 1960s and has contributed to a publication about the role of music in activist movements of the 1960s. His current research focuses on jazz and activism, and centers specifically on Honk! A Festival of Activist Street Bands. Isaac has served the president of FOCUS@UK, a student organization that promotes research in music, and serves as the IT Director of the Graduate Student Congress. He is also the graduate student representative of the South Central Chapter of the American Musicological Society and serves on the Public Relations Committee of the Society of American Music.

MemberPeter Johan Lor

Semi-retired after a career as librarian, researcher,  library director and library school professor.  Current research focuses on international and comparative librarianship, with an emphasis on research method and on the ethical and political economic aspects of international information relations. Recent publications on libraries in the political process, libraries and peace, and libraries in a post-truth environment.

MemberJulia V. Douthwaite

French literature of 18th and 19th centuries, French Revolution and its aftermath in literature, English–French relations, popular culture. I am most interested in the reappropriation of symbolic stories from the past into present-day media. My latest book, _The Frankenstein of 1790 and Other Lost Chapters from Revolutionary France_ (UChicago Press, 2012), has been translated into French with the help of former students Pierre André (currently PhD candidate at NYU) and Alexane Bébin (Univ. de Rennes), and is under review.
Since 2012, I have been leading a writing workshop for kids called “Write YOUR Story” at the public library in South Bend. We write stories and create altered books (based on used hard-bound children’s books). This is one way I have devised to get out of the academy and use my skills to enable a new public to experience the joys of writing and book-creation.