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MemberBilly Clark

My teaching and research interests cover a broad range of language and linguistics-related topics. My research interests are all connected in some way with linguistic meaning (linguistic semantics and pragmatics), usually within the framework of relevance theory. I have a particular interest in how meanings are created and negotiated in specific contexts. I’m currently working on research in three areas: prosodic meaning, stylistics and the inferential processes involved in writing.

MemberMartin Konvička

I am currently working on my PhD in linguistics at Freie Universität Berlin, Germany. In my research, I focus on grammar theory, obligatoriness, grammaticalisation and other related language change processes. Moreover, I am also interested in the applications of evolution theory in linguistics, history of linguistic thought, and translation studies. I have taught undergraduate courses on English and German historical linguistics, introduction to linguistics, semantics, pragmatics, and Sprachbund phenomena.

MemberA.G. Holdier

I am a master’s student in the Philosophy department of the University of Arkansas. My current research focuses on the semantics/pragmatics divide and other issues in the philosophy of language (including contextualism, deixis, and the meaning of gestures). I am also a graduate candidate in the Office of Sustainability’s certificate program exploring the relationship between green business practices and animal ethics. Additional interests include embodiment’s implications for moral psychology, axiological grounding and its relationship to political ecology, various issues in the philosophy of religion (atheological arguments, philosophical eschatology, theological aesthetics), and Ancient Greek philosophy (specifically, Plato).

MemberEleanor Sandry

My research is focused on developing an ethical and pragmatic recognition of, and respect for, otherness and difference in communication. I write about communication theory and practice, and draw upon varied examples—taken from science and technology, science fiction and creative art—to illustrate the ideas in my work. Much of my work to date has explored the communicative possibilities illustrated by human interactions with humanoid and non-humanoid robots, looking to fact and fiction, science and art, for inspiration. This research has now been published (along with some more recent thinking about human interactions with explosive ordnance disposal robots and robotic floor cleaners) as a book, Robots and Communication, with Palgrave Macmillan in the Pivot series.

MemberElizabeth Hutton

Lizzie Hutton is Assistant Professor of English and Director of the Howe Writing Center at Miami University, Ohio, where she works with Elizabeth Wardle. Lizzie’s current book project, Textual Transactions: Engaging Reading-Writing in Higher Education, offers an integrative theory of reading-writing for the context of the college classroom and interrogates prevailing U.S. higher education paradigms that position reading and writing as properly separable fields of study. More specifically, her book reanimates the work of Louise Rosenblatt, using Rosenblatt’s early career to make a case for a more pragmatically integrated model for building culturally sensitive literacy knowledge–including both writing studies and literary studies—in the humanities.

MemberJonathan Herold

My field of research is the study of pragmatic aspects of early medieval literate culture, particularly early record-keeping practices and modes of memorialization.  My doctoral thesis (Centre for Medieval Studies in the University of Toronto, 2008) is an analysis of the composition and preservation of Worcester Cathedral’s Conquest-era archive.  I currently teach undergraduate courses on the Vikings in European History and Culture (University of Trinity College of the University of Toronto), the History of Early and Later Medieval Europe and the History of Anglo-Saxon England (Glendon College of York University); I have also taught in the Department of History of Trent University-Oshawa.  I have contributed electronic text markup and data development for Professor A. P. M. Orchard’s “Mapping Anglo-Saxon Poetry Project” (University of Toronto) and pre-Conquest English charter data to Professor Michael Gervers’ DMC-DEEDS Project.