Search

MemberSteven Tötösy de Zepetnek

Steven Tötösy de Zepetnek’s http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/clcweblibrary/totosycv areas of scholarship include (comparative) literature and cultural studies; comparative media and communication studies; postcolonial studies; (im)migration and ethnic minority studies; digital humanities (new media and knowledge management); education incl. online education and design; editing and publishing (print & online); film and literature; audience studies; European, US-American, and Canadian cultures and literatures; history; bibliography; and conflict management and diversity training. Education: B.A. history and German studies (U of Western Ontario 1980), M.A. comparative literature (Carleton U 1983), B.Ed. history and English as a second language (U of Ottawa 1984), Ph.D. comparative literature (U of Alberta 1989). Teaching: comparative literature, German, and English U of Alberta 1984-2000; media and communication studies U of Halle-Wittenberg 2002-2011; comparative literature Purdue U 2000-; education & cultural studies Ghent U 2012-; and (distinguished) visiting professorships in the U.S., Europe, and Asia. Publications: single-authored books include Comparative Cultural Studies and the Future of the Humanities (forthcoming); Comparative Literature: Theory, Method, Application; The Social Dimensions of Fiction; edited volumes include Digital Humanities and the Study of Intermediality in Comparative Cultural Studies; Companion to Comparative Literature, World Literatures, and Comparative Cultural Studies; Mapping the World, Culture, and Border-crossing; Perspectives on Identity, Migration, and Displacement; Imre Kertész and Holocaust Literature; Comparative Hungarian Cultural Studies; Comparative Central European Holocaust Studies; The New Central and East European Culture; Comparative Cultural Studies and Michael Ondaatje’s Writing; 200+ articles in peer-reviewed journals; also publications in Chinese, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Macedonian, Mara-thi, Polish, Portuguese, and Spanish translation. Editing and publishing 1981-current including series editor of Books in Comparative Cultural Studies (Purdue UP); Books in Comparative Culture, Media, and Communication Studies (Shaker Press); Research Institute for Comparative Literature Book Publishing Programme (U of Alber-ta); editor, CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture (Purdue UP), Canadian Review of Comparative Litera-ture/Revue Canadienne de Littérature Comparée (Canadian Comparative Literature Association / Association Canadienne de Littérature Comparée), and special issues of various journals. Languages: near-native English, native German and Hungarian, fluent French, reading Latin, Russian, Spanish, Italian.

MemberShirin A. Khanmohamadi

I am an Associate Professor of premodern literature in the Comparative and World Literature department at San Francisco State University, where I’ve been teaching since 2005.  My location in a Comparative and World Literature department means that my teaching necessarily extends beyond my training as in European and Mediterranean studies to embrace the literatures of premodern Asia, Africa and the Americas.  My research and writing is likewise marked by comparative methods and interdisciplinarity: my first book, In Light of Another’s Word: European Ethnography in the Middle Ages (UPenn, 2014), considered postcolonial critical-anthropological critiques of colonial ethnographic description and the ethnographic gaze in order to bring into sharp relief the differences of premodern ethnographic representation, namely its dialogism, particularly where European description predated colonial control.  In showing a Latin Europe incorporative and integrative of the voices and perspectives of its (internal and external) others, I was also interested in the open-ended nature of European identity in its formative period. My current book project continues this interest while returning me to the complex ‘matter of Saracens,’ which first drew me to the study of the Middle Ages.  Rethinking Saracens and their Objects in the Epic: Translation, Association, Desire deploys translatio/n theory and material culture studies to read the movement of symbolic objects associated with Muslim imperial authority in chansons de geste and chronicles as evidence of European desire for ‘prestigious association’ with various Islamicate empires in the Middle Ages.  I thereby call for renewed attention, through the work of these critically neglected objects, to  ‘the Arabic role’ (Menocal 1987) in Europe’s cultural and imperial self-fashioning. I’m honored to have been elected to serve on the Executive Committee of the MLA Forum, CCLS: Medieval, for the term 2019-24.    

MemberNeema GHENIM

Ghenim Neema is a lecturer of English Literature and a director of research laboratory at the University Mohamed Ben Ahmed, Oran 2, Algeria. She earned a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature on Sufism in Algeria as well as Transcendentalism in the United States. Her field of interest is comparative literature with a focus on postcolonial Africa and the question of democracy as well as the challenge between remembering and forgetfulness. She is also interested in literary theories dealing with questions of gender and identity in literary discourse. As a teacher, she tries to make connections between literature and history. She engages and inspires her students to cultivate their curiosity.

MemberAnthony Alessandrini

I am a Professor of English at Kingsborough Community College-CUNY and of Middle Eastern Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center. I’m also on the faculty of the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research. My areas of specialization include postcolonial literature and theory, the culture and politics of the Middle East and North Africa, literary and cultural theory, critical race studies, and poetry and poetics. My publications include the book Frantz Fanon and the Future of Cultural Politics: Finding Something Different; the edited collection Frantz Fanon: Critical Perspectives; and the co-edited volume “Resistance Everywhere”: The Gezi Protests and Dissident Visions of Turkey (with Nazan Üstündağ and Emrah Yildiz). Last but not least, I am a Co-Editor of Jadaliyya, an e-zine dedicated to the politics and culture of the Middle East and North Africa.

MemberAlmas Khan

As an intellectual historian, I analyze how modernism in American law and literature has shaped the quest for equal citizenship. Drawing on my Ph.D. in English and my J.D. with a focus on constitutional history, I interrogate how creative forms of legal dissent – ranging from judicial opinions to lyric poems – have sparked constitutional reimagination in the context of African American, working-class, and women’s experiences. My current book project, An Intellectual Reconstruction: American Legal Realism, Literary Realism, and the Formation of Citizenship, construes legal realism (a progenitor of critical race theory) and literary realism as a major post-Civil War movements connecting disciplinary critiques to equitist politics. I have additional interests in British literary modernism and postcolonial studies, having composed articles on Joseph Conrad’s and Virginia Woolf’s texts. My literary and legal scholarship has been published in several anthologies and journals, including Critical Insights: Social Justice and American Literature; Critical Insights: Inequality; Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History; the Cambridge Journal of Postcolonial Literary Inquiry; and the Chicago Journal of International Law. Forthcoming articles include “Black Lives Matter and Legal Reconstructions of Elegiac Forms” and “Applied Legal Storytelling: Toward a Stylistics of Embodiment.” I have also published widely on writing studies pedagogy through the lens of critical theory, drawing on extensive experiences teaching literature, law, and composition. My pedagogical scholarship has appeared in the Washburn Law JournalPerspectives: Teaching Legal Research & WritingThe Law Teacher, and the anthology Writing as a Way of Staying Human in a Time that Isn’t. When not immersed in literature, law, history, and philosophy, I explore modernist-inflected alternative music, fashion, interior design, landscapes, gardens, and other aesthetic phenomena suiting my fancy.

MemberTracy Lemos

I am Associate Professor of Hebrew Bible at Huron University College and a member of the graduate school faculty at the University of Western Ontario.  As a biblical scholar and historian, my interests are broadly social and cultural.   My first book is entitled Marriage Gifts and Social Change in Ancient Palestine, 1200 BCE to 200 CE, and was published by Cambridge University Press.  My second monograph, Violence and Personhood in Ancient Israel and Comparative Contexts, will be available in the fall of 2017 from Oxford University Press.  I live in London, Ontario with my wife Andrea Allen, an anthropologist and religion scholar.

MemberAndré Carrington

andré carrington is a scholar of race, gender, and genre in Black and American cultural production. He is the Beatrice Shepherd Blane Fellow in the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University (2018-2019) and Associate Professor of African American literature at Drexel University. His first book, Speculative Blackness: The Future of Race in Science Fiction (Minnesota, 2016) interrogates the cultural politics of race in the fantastic genres through studies of science fiction fanzines, comics, film and television, and other speculative fiction texts. He is currently at work on a second book-length research project, Audiofuturism, on the cultural politics of race in science fiction radio drama and literary adaptation in a transatlantic context. carrington’s writing appears in journals (American LiteratureSouls, and African & Black Diaspora), books (A Companion to the Harlem Renaissance, Black Gay Genius: Answering Joseph Beam’s Call), and blogs (Black Perspectives). He is also a contributor to the forthcoming collections Digital Pedagogies in the Humanities and After Queer Studies: Literary Theory and Critical Interpretation. With cartoonist Jennifer Camper, he co-founded the biennial Queers & Comics international conference in 2015. He teaches courses in African American and Global Black Literature, Literary Theory, Black Liberation Movements, LGBT Literature & Culture, Comics & Graphic Novels, and Science Fiction. He’s also a birder.