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MemberJeremy Garber

Jeremy Garber is the Team Lead of the Academic Advising Center and an Adjunct Instructor in Theology at the Iliff School of Theology. He is a graduate of the Ph.D. Religious Studies program in Theology, Philosophy, and Cultural Theory at the University of Denver and the Iliff School of Theology. Jeremy received his M.Div. from Associated Mennonite Biblical Seminary in Indiana, concentrating in theology and ethics. Dr. Garber’s dissertation was titled “‘Another Way’: The Pneumatology of Deleuzean Minoritarian Communal Interpretation in Scripture, the 16th Century Radical Reformation, and Alternative 21st century Anabaptist Community.” His primary research is on the idea of the Holy Spirit and the interpretation of popular culture in religious communities, using media theory and Deleuzean philosophy. Dr. Garber has published articles on the perception of Anabaptism in contemporary literature, the authority of Scripture in young adults, and theology in popular culture. He has also taught courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels in constructive theology, philosophy of religion, religion and popular culture, ethics, and comparative religion. He and his daughter, Fiona, are members of First Mennonite Church in Denver.

MemberStella Marega

Political Philosopher and Politologist. My research focuses on the relationships between philosophy, religion and politics, with special attention to the processes of re-divinization of politics and to the eschatological tension in modern political movements. I investigated thoroughly the thought of Eric Voegelin, Karl Löwith, Jakob Taubes, Alois Dempf, and the legacy of Joachim of Fiore’s eschatological theology of history in modern society. I also deal with problems of symbolic interpretations of political power, corporeality and apocalypse in post-modern imagery and in popular culture.

MemberPatrick McCullough

I currently serve as an Upper School History Teacher at Harvard-Westlake School in Los Angeles (US History; The World and Europe). In the classroom, I guide students as they further embrace their own analytical voices on difficult topics with confidence and clarity. I have broad teaching expertise that spans history, religion, and literature from the ancient world to the present. In my classes, I help students make creative connections between the ancient and modern; between dense theoretical materials and popular culture. In their evaluations, my students often note how much they appreciate an instructor who pushes the boundaries of their analytical abilities but also meets them where they are. I earned a Ph.D. in History of Religion, Early Christianity, at UCLA, where I also served as a regular Teaching Fellow. In my academic work, I examine representations of ideologies and identities in ancient Jewish and Christian texts and their modern interpreters. My work problematizes the modern categories we deploy in our discussions of antiquity and religion. My dissertation, “Apocalypse and Difference: Rereading Cultural Boundaries in Early Christian Texts,” explores how apocalyptic discourse in early Christian texts maintains group boundaries as their Christ-confessing authors simultaneously participate in the discursive practices of their ancient Mediterranean society and culture.