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MemberDaniel W. Pratt

I’m interested in Central and Eastern European literature, culture, film, and intellectual history, from Germany to Russia. My current research focuses on the intersection of literature, philosophy, narrative, and aesthetics from the 18th century to the present day. I work primarily on the 20th and 21st centuries, although I have a continuing interest in the 19th century as well (particularly Romanticism and the development of narratological paradigms). I am currently finishing a book project on constructing non-narrative temporalities in Central Europe. I argue that Central European authors rejected narrative constructions of time, opting instead for forms of episodes, collage, and spectral traces to develop alternative temporal constructions. My next project takes me to the 1980s in Central Europe where the second generation of dissidents rejected not only the socialist regimes but also the opposition of the previous generation.

MemberVeronika Wieser

I am Postdoc researcher at the Institute for Medieval Research, Austrian Academy of Sciences and lecturer at the University of Vienna. I am a cultural historian of Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages, with an emphasis on interdisciplinary, comparative research. – I was coordinator and project member of the SFB  “Visions of Community. Comparative Approaches to Ethnicity, Region and Empire in Christianity, Islam and Buddhism (400-1600 CE)” from 2011 to 2019, and I am editorial board member of the journal “Medieval Worlds: Comparative and Interdisciplinary Studies”. My research focuses on apocalyptic thought and topics of eschatology, on historiography and ascetic communities in the Late Roman Empire and the early medieval period, with particular interest on issues of religious and ethnic identity, notions of death and salvation, and medical history. I have co-edited two interdisciplinary volumes on apocalypticism and eschatology (Cultures of Eschatology, 2020; Abendländische Apokalyptik. Zur Genealogie der Endzeit, 2013) and I am currently working on a book on eschatology in Late Antiquity.

MemberMaria Jose Afanador-Llach

Maria José Afanador Llach is an assistant professor in digital humanities at the School of Arts and Humanities, Universidad de los Andes (Colombia). He earned a master’s degree and a doctorate in history from the University of Texas at Austin. Maria José studies the 18th century and the transition between colony and republic in northern South America through the lens of spatial practices, geographic imagination, and political economy. She also investigates the construction of collaborative communities in digital humanities projects, the creation of digital cartographic narratives, and the construction of spatial data sets for research in history. She is editor of The Programming Historian en español.

MemberNarayanamoorthy Nanditha

I am a fourth-year Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Humanities at York University, Toronto. My research in Digital Humanities is focused on the interrogation of post-humanistic identity construction for online collectivities through Digital Activism in India through Web API use for Big Data extraction. My other project posits a computational analysis of Genocide literature in the exploration of trauma and memory structures within these narratives through sentiment analysis. I am a member of the Canadian Society for Digital Humanities (CSDH/SCHN) and York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR) . My intention is to contribute innovatively to Digital Humanities scholarship. Feel free to get in touch for collaborative ideas in DH Projects!My email address is nanditha [at] yorku [dot] ca.

MemberTaylor R. Genovese

Taylor R. Genovese is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Human and Social Dimensions of Science and Technology program at Arizona State University, where he draws on his background in sociocultural anthropology, political theory, and religious studies in order to pursue his interest in the social imaginaries of human immortality and resurrection on Earth and in outer space. His dissertation research examines the elective affinities between the techno-theology of Russian Cosmism and the constructed secularity of Silicon Valley transhumanist movements with regard to matters of technology, immortality, and engagements with eschatological utopias. In particular, he is investigating not only the overlaps and continuities between these two trans-temporal communities, but also the equally striking disjunctions and distortions between their ethos and political economies. Ultimately, he’s interested in the ways in which utopian ideas rooted in human solidarity and care get transmuted into the egocentric dreams of the wealthy.