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MemberCat Quine

I am currently a Junior Research Fellow at Merton College, Oxford, on research leave from my post as Assistant Professor in Hebrew Bible at the University of Nottingham. My research centres around history, politics and rhetoric in the Hebrew Bible and I am especially interested in how the biblical authors’ perception of historical events has affected the composition of the biblical texts and the history portrayed therein.

MemberJonathan Schmidt-Swartz

Jonathan Schmidt-Swartz is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University focusing on Hebrew Bible and the Ancient Near East. His primary research interests and dissertation focus broadly on the intersection of ancient scribal culture, critical theory, and kingship. More specifically, his dissertation aims to trace the intellectual history and historiography of kingship in more concrete terms, namely, by determining how post-monarchic scribes reinterpreted sources they inherited; how the juxtapositions of monarchic sources to their post-monarchic framings entails a two-way reinterpretation between older and newer texts. Unlike previous studies on the history of kingship in Israel-Judah, his work seeks to unpack the differing notions of kingship — the power dynamics between the king, Yahweh, and the people — through the lens of specific scribal practices as his guiding method. His objective is to understand, recognize, and begin to pull apart the layered conceptions of kingship on display in the Bible’s primary narrative about the kingdoms and recognize at once the conscious diachronic juxtaposition of sources by scribes and their synchronic multivalent unity. Dissertation: Recasting Kingship: Power, Disrupted History, and Scribal Adaptation Interests: Hebrew Bible, Ancient Near East, Critical Theory, Scribal Culture, Religious Studies/History of Religions, History/Historiography, Jewish Studies, Interdisciplinary Humanities, Public Humanities

MemberDustin Nash

Dustin Nash’s research straddles disciplinary boundaries through its exploration of the nexus between religion, politics, and identity in the formation of the Hebrew Bible, and the repercussions of scribal engagement with these categories in the development of Judaism. Dustin received his B.A. in 2004 from Luther College of Decorah, IA.  He was a visiting graduate student at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem from 2004-2005, received an MTS from Harvard Divinity School in 2007, an MA in Near Eastern Studies from Cornell University in 2011, and his PhD from the same institution in 2015.  He is currently Assistant Professor of Religion Studies at Muhlenberg College in Allentown, PA.  His courses there include “Jewish Traditions,” “Paths in Jewish Thought,” “Introduction to the Hebrew Bible,” “Reading Biblical Hebrew,” “Rabbinic Texts and Traditions,” “Speaking with the Divine: Divination, Shamanism, and Prophecy,” and “Myth, Religion, and Creation.”

MemberTracy Lemos

I am Associate Professor of Hebrew Bible at Huron University College and a member of the graduate school faculty at the University of Western Ontario.  As a biblical scholar and historian, my interests are broadly social and cultural.   My first book is entitled Marriage Gifts and Social Change in Ancient Palestine, 1200 BCE to 200 CE, and was published by Cambridge University Press.  My second monograph, Violence and Personhood in Ancient Israel and Comparative Contexts, will be available in the fall of 2017 from Oxford University Press.  I live in London, Ontario with my wife Andrea Allen, an anthropologist and religion scholar.

MemberMark George

Mark K. George is Professor of Bible and Ancient Systems of Thought at the Iliff School of Theology in Denver, Colorado. His scholarship primarily treats the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and, within that corpus, the Pentateuch and narrative texts. The focus of his work is on ancient systems of thought operating within this literature, whether they be social systems and structures expressed through the practices and conceptions of space, or the creation of particular subjectivities and the ways in which individuals govern or conduct their lives. George is the author or editor of three books, including Israel’s Tabernacle as Social Space (SBL Press, 2009) and a number of articles and encyclopedia entries, including “Aniconism” in The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and the Arts (Oxford, 2016). His current project is a book titled Deuteronomy’s Subject: Governmentality and the Creation of “Israel,” an analysis of the systems and techniques by which Deuteronomy creates Israel as a governable subject, one that is loyal and docile. He also is learning natural language processing (NLP), which is opening up new avenues of research as well as new perspectives from which to examine ancient systems of thought.

MemberDaniel Pioske

Dan Pioske is an Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Georgia Southern University where he teaches in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies. His first book, “David’s Jerusalem: Between Memory and History,” was published by Routledge in 2015, and his second book, “Memory in a Time of Prose: Studies in Epistemology, Hebrew Scribalism, and the Biblical Past,” was published by Oxford in 2018. His research centers on the relationship between archaeology and the biblical writings, the history of ancient Israel, and how we read the Bible in the 21st century. He lives in Savannah, Georgia, with his wife Suzette and their two daughters, Eve and Esther.

MemberJames Walters

I teach courses on biblical studies and early Christianity at Rochester University in Michigan. My research is primarily focused on the early Syriac traditions of Christianity, particularly the spread of Christianity within the Persian Empire. More broadly, I am also interested in the reception and transmission of Scripture, Jewish-Christian relations, and post-Chalcedonian Christological disputes.