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MemberMegan Gallagher

I am a political theorist and an assistant professor in the Department of Gender and Race Studies at the University of Alabama. My areas of research include sex and gender in the history of political thought (especially in the 17th and 18th centuries), contemporary feminist political theory, and politics and literature. I also have a longstanding interest in the political thought of the French Enlightenment. In 2018-2019, I was a lecturer in the American Studies, Women’s and Gender Studies, and Master of Liberal Arts and Science Programs at Vanderbilt University. I was previously a visiting assistant professor with the Vanderbilt Department of Political Science and the Whitman College Department of Politics, as well as a lecturer in the UCLA Department of Political Science. I have held the Carol G. Lederer Postdoctoral Fellowship in Gender Studies at Brown University’s Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women and the Clark Dissertation Fellowship at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library in Los Angeles. I received my PhD in from the UCLA Department of Political Science in 2014.

MemberAma Bemma Adwetewa-Badu

My research focuses on politics, aesthetics, and identity construction and representation as articulated through avant-garde poetics and 20th/21st century Anglophone Black diasporic literature and culture, especially poetry. I am especially interested in the intersection of politics and aesthetics in literature, and the ways in which avant-garde poetics disrupt preconceived notions of Blackness  (and personhood) while constructing an open nature to the signs placed upon the (black) body. My most recent project, “Iterations of Identity: Black Diasporic Poetics and the Politics of Form,” positions these interests in a comparative aesthetic perspective, with a focus on examining avant-garde poetics through a primary lens of close-reading and aesthetics, including a study of the politics of aesthetics as dictated by neo-colonialism in West-Africa and the Caribbean, and racialized climates constructed by the global white gaze.