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MemberLajos Brons

My philosophical interests are divided over two broad areas. One is in the overlap of (meta-) ethics and social/political philosophy; the other is in the intersection of philosophy of language, metaphysics, and epistemology. Much (but not all) of my work is most closely affiliated with the analytic tradition both in style and content, and much of it is heavily influenced by the philosophies of Donald Davidson and W.V.O. Quine, but I am also interested in (parts of) Indian, Chinese, and continental philosophy. Before I became a “philosopher” I was an economic geographer. I gradually moved from one discipline to the other, but I remain interested in geography, heterodox economics, and in the other social sciences as well. For further information about my research themes, see my personal homepage.

MemberIngo Frank

I am a digital humanist and data librarian with an academic background in philosophy, information and computer science. My research interests are applied ontology, knowledge organization, and diagrammatic reasoning for digital history considered as historical information science. Currently I am working with semantic web and linked data technologies in order to build document and research data repositories to support interdisciplinary research on historical and social phenomena.

MemberDavid E. Roy

45 years as a private practice psychotherapist, 90% retired. Dissertation a detailed correlation of Alfred North Whitehead’s Process Philosophy and the original theory of Gestalt Therapy. Have been involved in numerous events sponsored by the Center for Process Studies for decades. Recently published an article showing the high degree of correlation between Whitehead’s theory of perception and the different ways in which the right and left hemispheres process and organize information. This article suggests that Whitehead’s metaphysics can serve as the metatheory for neuroscience. The other primary interest is lifting out the fundamental factors that give rise to our species drive to inflict violence and oppression on other members of our species.  

MemberJames South

My primary areas of research are Augustine, Late Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy, Ordinary Language Philosophy (especially the thought of Stanley Cavell), and Philosophy and Popular Culture. Much of my research to date in the history of philosophy has focused on issues associated with questions about cognition in later medieval philosophy, for example, intentionality, sensation and knowledge of the singular. The reason for this focus is my suspicion that the precise contours of Descartes’ indebtedness to Late Scholastic thought are still not well understood due to a failure to appreciate some distinctive turns made in discussions concerning the intellect in the 15th and 16th centuries. My writing on popular culture–tv shows, music, comic books, etc.–allows me to explore some interests I have in contemporary philosophy, including the social context in which philosophy finds itself. Recent published work includes an essay on Zabarella and regressus theory (in the Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal), an essay on comic book heroes and modernity in a volume of essays edited by William Irwin and Jorge Gracia, an essay on the Beatles and the practice of philosophy, an essay on Veronica Mars and Skepticism, and the volumes James Bond and Philosophy (co-edited with Jacob M. Held), Buffy Goes Dark (co-edited with Lynn Edwards and Elizabeth Rambo) and Mad Men and Philosophy (co-edited with Rod Carveth). My most recent published work, with Jacob M. Held is a co-edited book entitled Philosophy and Terry Pratchett for Palgrave-Macmillan. I sometimes blog at andphilosophy.com. For the last eleven years, I have edited the journal Philosophy and Theology. I have also begun coursework as an Academic Candidate at the Michigan Psychoanalytic Institute. You can find more information about my publications at my bepress.com site. I regularly teach undergraduate courses in Social and Political Philosophy. My interests there are directed at the development of the modern tradition of political thought from Machiavelli to Mill and the criticism of that tradition begun by Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and others. I also regularly teach a course on the history and philosophy of crime and punishment. I have recently developed several new courses. One, “Philosophy and Popular Culture,” explores several philosophical issues associated with popular culture, while also looking closely at various ways of thinking about the discipline of philosophy. Another, “Philosophy and Film,” takes as its central text Stanley Cavell’s Cities of Words. Another, “Conceiving the Subject,” look at various texts from 20th century literature and thought to see how we can best approach the vexed question of the notion of ‘the subject.’ I am especially concerned in this course with making problematic the notion of ‘authenticity’ by focusing on several challenges stemming from the work of Freud, Wittgenstein, Adorno, and others. On the graduate level, I often teach a Plato course, specialized courses on Augustine, Late Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy (“Franciscan Philosophy,” “Humanism and Platonism in the Renaissance”), and a course on Marx and Moral Theory. Most recently, I developed a course on the thought of Cora Diamond and Stanley Cavell. For many years I taught a freshman seminar in the honors program on the work of Joss Whedon.

MemberJames M. Harland

I work on the history and archaeology of late antique and early medieval Western Europe, specifically Britain and Gaul, with a focus on processes of transformation and ethnic change. My broader interests lie in ethnic identity, transformation and continuity, and military and economic history, in addition to the philosophical and ethical implications of the study of these fields and their reception and misuse in the modern day, drawing upon continental philosophy and literary theory to explore these concerns. My doctoral thesis was a critical historiography of the study of ethnic identity through archaeological means in late and post-Roman Britain, making use of ethnic sociology and continental philosophy to examine and interrogate the epistemological foundations which underpin this subject of study. More information about my research, publications, CV and teaching can be found on my hcommons site, here.

MemberMaria Manuel Borges

Maria Manuel Borges is an Associate Professor in Information Science at the University of Coimbra and co-coordinator of the Digital Humanities Group at the Centre for 20th Century Interdisciplinary Studies – CEIS20 of the University of Coimbra. She is the Head of the Department of Philosophy, Communication, and Information. She is also the coordinator of PhD and Graduation courses in Information Science of the University of Coimbra. She has supervised several PhD and Master theses. She is a member of the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics, Association of Digital Humanities (AHDig), and BAD, the Portuguese Association of Librarians and Archivists. She is also a member of the editorial board of national and international journals and Associate Editor of the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). She is a member of the Interministerial Working Group, sub-group Research Assessment, whose mission is, among others, to advise the Portuguese Ministry of Science, Technology and Higher Education about the strategic orientation for the National Open Science initiative sub-group Evaluation of Science. She is also a member of the Research Data Alliance and a member of the board supported by the University of Coimbra of the node RDA.pt. Her current research interests are on scholarly communication with a focus on open access, research evaluation, digital preservation, digital libraries, and copyright.

MemberMaggie Murphy

Hi, I’m Maggie Murphy! I’m an assistant professor and librarian at UNC Greensboro, where I work with students and faculty in first-year writing, studio art, art education, art history, history, philosophy, and religious studies. I also teach a graduate course I designed on visual resources curation and art librarianship as a lecturer at San Jose State University’s iSchool. I love image research (especially exploring public domain media) and description, and working with students on critical and ethical information creation and use. My current work focuses on using internet memes as a lens for interdisciplinary visual literacy instruction.