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MemberNicholas Perez

Currently an independent research focusing on religion, philosophy, and history who is hoping to attend the University of Louisville for the PhD in Humanities program.  Planned research is over Teresa of Avila’s epistemology of the body. Research interests include Virgin Mary, primarily theological conceptions conerning her and cultural reception of her; theology and history of Christianity (primary periods ancient, medieval, and postmodern), particular focus on concepts of salvation, the Eucharist, gender, and the body; female Christian mystics, primarily Catherine of Siena and Teresa of Avila; Biblical exegesis, translation, and literary analysis; connections between literature and religion; philosophy of Plato, Augustine, Aquinas, Nietzsche, Freud, Heideggar, Bataille, Beauvoir, Kirsteva, and Irigaray (primary philosophic interest is existential phenomenology).

MemberNathan A. Kennedy

At heart, I’m a phenomenologist. This is the lens with which I investigate my primary interests of religion, sexuality, and culture, reflecting my passion for interdisciplinarity amongst the humanities and social sciences. Through this, I come into contact with practical theology, critical theory, queer theory, and psychoanalytic theory, along with other fields of discourse. With a theo-ethical foundation in deconstructive and existential hermeneutics, I work to discover phenomenological methods, theological insights, and practical approaches relating to the lived experiences LGBTQ persons and communities, intersecting theory with practice in clinical and community advocacy contexts, with ultimate outcomes in the forms of strategies in advocacy, policy, and pedagogy.

MemberA.G. Holdier

I am a master’s student in the Philosophy department of the University of Arkansas. My current research focuses on the semantics/pragmatics divide and other issues in the philosophy of language (including contextualism, deixis, and the meaning of gestures). I am also a graduate candidate in the Office of Sustainability’s certificate program exploring the relationship between green business practices and animal ethics. Additional interests include embodiment’s implications for moral psychology, axiological grounding and its relationship to political ecology, various issues in the philosophy of religion (atheological arguments, philosophical eschatology, theological aesthetics), and Ancient Greek philosophy (specifically, Plato).

MemberJohn E. Drabinski

John E. Drabinski is Charles Hamilton Houston 1915 Professor of Black Studies in the Department of Black Studies at Amherst College. In addition to authoring four books, most recently Glissant and the Middle Passage: Philosophy, Beginning, Abyss (Minnesota, 2019) and Levinas and the Postcolonial: Race, Nation, Other (Edinburgh, 2012), he has written over three dozen articles on Africana theory and French philosophy, and has edited books and journal issues on Frantz Fanon, Jean-Luc Godard, Emmanuel Levinas, Édouard Glissant, and the question of political reconciliation. He is currently finalizing a translation and critical introduction to Jean Bernabé, Patrick Chamoiseau, and Raphael Confiant’s Éloge de la créolité, and is completing a book-length study of the philosophical dimensions of James Baldwin’s non-fiction entitled ‘So Unimaginable a Price’: Baldwin and the Black Atlantic.

MemberAnthony Adler

Anthony Curtis Adler is professor of Comparative Literature at Yonsei’s Underwood International College in South Korea, where he has taught since 2006. He is the author of Celebricities: Media Culture and the Phenomenology of Gadget Commodity Life (Fordham: 2016), a critical edition of Fichte’s The Closed Commercial State, and a short book titled The Afterlife of Genre: Remnants of the Trauerspiel in Buffy the Vampire Slayer. He has also published numerous articles, in such journals as Continental Philosophy ReviewAngelakiCultural CritiqueDiacritics, and Seminar. He is currently working on a book on Friedrich Hoelderlin’s Hyperion.

MemberMichael Miller

I’m a researcher and teacher, in the broad area of philosophy and religion. Slightly narrower, my specialism is Judaism, and narrower still I focus on Jewish mysticism and modern Jewish philosophy (usually of the more ‘secular’ flavour: Benjamin, Rosenzweig, Levinas, et al). However I’m stubbornly interdisciplinary and usually try to cross the boundaries between different aspects of philosophy and speculative thought as well as trying to keep up with current research in scientific, linguistic and psychological fields which connect with my interests. Keeping it broad helps to revitalise intellectual disciplines and keep them exciting. The other area I’m increasingly focusing on in my research and teaching is Black Judaism, especially the Hebrew Israelite movement. I’m also very interested in experimenting with the forms of research, writing and teaching – making these practices more accessible, more artistic, more willing to think outside the usual boxes.