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DepositRegenerating the Live: The Archive as the Genesis of a Performance Practice

Live performance lacks the durability of art practices such as photography, film and painting, and so definitions of ‘live’ acts have traditionally been formulated in terms of ‘transience’ and ‘disappearance’. In this context the archive and archival documents are often described as the antithesis of performance’s ontology. An archive’s primary function is to preserve material for future, undetermined uses, whereas a live event is temporary and cannot endure as ‘itself’ outside of the temporal-spatial zone it unfolds in before an audience. Yet archival documents are intimately imbricated in the creation of live acts. This can be seen in all performance practices, from written plays in the dramatic theatre, to the assemblage of materials used in devised performance, to the ways sites are framed as sources of historical knowledge in performance reenactments. By examining the role documents play in performance practice I argue that archival materials have the potential to act as the genesis for live acts. The archive’s generative function makes performance a potential method of historical research, where documents can help engender an interactive reciprocity between spectators and the past. The archival mode of performance practice I advocate in this thesis requires spectators to become participants inside the performance sphere, just as historians participate in the writing of historical discourses in the archive.

DepositGoing gonzo: toward a performative practice in multimodal ethnography

In an unconventional anthropological provocation that fuses (visual) narrative with analysis, this article discusses the ways in which living history as a playfully performative—but intellectually and materially rigorous—hobby can entangle with multimodal anthropology in ways that produce mutually beneficial embodied practices. Pulling from performance theory and Flyvbjerg’s (2001) theorization of a phronetic social science, it is argued that anthropologists should adopt an external performative practice in addition to conducting ethnographic research. By doing so, it allows anthropologists to deal with the uncertainty and vicissitudes of ethnographic fieldwork while cultivating a rewarding external performative practice. Likewise, an anthropologist’s chosen external performative practice helps to build confidence and develop extra-ethnographic skillsets for one’s primary research. However, this approach carries with it political and ethical pitfalls; namely, the risk of losing sight of one’s positionality as a researcher. Through an infusion of concepts like ethnographic refusal and anti-hegemonic phronesis, multimodal ethnography, and its partnered external performative practice(s), can become modes for equity, liberation, and justice.

DepositCue Sheets, Musical Suggestions, and Performance Practices for Hollywood Films, 1908–1927

Between 1908 and 1927, when sound film became standard, numerous American publications for both those involved in the film industry and the general public, such as Moving Picture World, Motion Picture News, and Exhibitors Herald, included regular columns by cinema conductors, composers, and arrangers like Samuel Berg, Ernst Luz, and Clarence Sinn for theatre accompanists on selecting and performing music for motion pictures. The earliest of these columns, dating from 1908, primarily argue for or against the inclusion of accompanimental music or discuss what kinds of music—classical instrumental, operatic, popular—for the cinema are most appropriate (or inappropriate) for the nascent art form. Later articles, however, offer suggestions—general recommendations of pieces to include in accompanying a specific film—and even full-fledged cue sheets, which provide musical references for each major scene in an individual motion picture. These led to the development of the studio-produced cue sheet, issued along with most major pictures. Yet despite claims that moving picture accompanists relied heavily on these cue sheets, archival materials suggest that they were more often used as jumping-off points for compiled scores created by accompanists, or were ignored altogether in favor of scores compiled from an accompanist’s or theatre’s existing music library or other resources. In this essay I examine the use of cue sheets found in several North American collections, demonstrating how cue sheets were actually used by accompanists at some of the largest motion picture palaces of the 1920s.

DepositReflections on (and in) Strunk’s Tonnetz

ABSTRACT Joon Park takes a closer look at Steven Strunk’s innovative application of the neo-Riemannian Tonnetz to jazz. Strunk reinterprets neo-Riemannian transformations as geometric reflections—as opposed to more conventional group theory operations—showing his understanding of jazz performance practice. Park clarifies the difference between conventional methods and Strunk’s. In addition to illustrating Steve’s close accord with jazz performance practice, Park extends his work by representing Z-related sets on the Tonnetz.

Deposit“Squiggly lines:” information literacy, music librarian/performers, and practicing what we preach: Tom Bickley’s Remarks

Many music librarians participate in professional and amateur music making. We face similar performance practice/interpretive issues as do our music library users. This panel discussion focuses on application of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy to performance practice in experimental music. Four music librarians with significant academic and applied expertise in performing experimental music describe their individual and collective processes in developing a performance of one page from Cornelius Cardew’s Treatise, a graphic score published in 1967. Panelists will describe processes, resources, challenges and discoveries, with special consideration for the analogous experiences of music library users. The session includes a 10 minute live trio performance of two pages from Treatise.

Deposit“Squiggly lines:” information literacy, music librarian/performers, and practicing what we preach: Chris Schiff’s Remarks

Many music librarians participate in professional and amateur music making. We face similar performance practice/interpretive issues as do our music library users. This panel discussion focuses on application of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy to performance practice in experimental music. Four music librarians with significant academic and applied expertise in performing experimental music describe their individual and collective processes in developing a performance of one page from Cornelius Cardew’s Treatise, a graphic score published in 1967. Panelists will describe processes, resources, challenges and discoveries, with special consideration for the analogous experiences of music library users. The session includes a 10 minute live trio performance of two pages from Treatise.

Deposit“Squiggly lines:” information literacy, music librarian/performers, and practicing what we preach: Ann Rhodes’ Remarks

Many music librarians participate in professional and amateur music making. We face similar performance practice/interpretive issues as do our music library users. This panel discussion focuses on application of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy to performance practice in experimental music. Four music librarians with significant academic and applied expertise in performing experimental music describe their individual and collective processes in developing a performance of one page from Cornelius Cardew’s Treatise, a graphic score published in 1967. Panelists will describe processes, resources, challenges and discoveries, with special consideration for the analogous experiences of music library users. The session includes a 10 minute live trio performance of two pages from Treatise.

Deposit“SQUIGGLY LINES:” INFORMATION LITERACY, MUSIC LIBRARIAN/PERFORMERS, AND PRACTICING WHAT WE PREACH: Slides

Many music librarians participate in professional and amateur music making. We face similar performance practice/interpretive issues as do our music library users. This panel discussion focuses on application of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy to performance practice in experimental music. Four music librarians with significant academic and applied expertise in performing experimental music describe their individual and collective processes in developing a performance of one page from Cornelius Cardew’s Treatise, a graphic score published in 1967. Panelists will describe processes, resources, challenges and discoveries, with special consideration for the analogous experiences of music library users. The session includes a 10 minute live trio performance of two pages from Treatise.

DepositInnovating Shakespeare: The Politics of Technological Partnership in the Royal Shakespeare Company’s The Tempest (2016)

This article examines the Royal Shakespeare Company’s (RSC) recent focus on digital ‘innovation’ by analysing the relationship between their emerging digital-focused business practices and digital performance practice for The Tempest (2016). To assess this relationship, I first review the socioeconomic context of 21st century neoliberal UK economic policy that encourages arts organisations such as the RSC to participate in innovative digital production practices. I follow with a definition and deconstruction of ‘innovation’ as a key term in UK economic policy. I then demonstrate how the RSC has strategically become involved in innovation practices throughout the 2010s. I will then analyse the digital, motion-capture performance practices the RSC developed in partnership with Intel and motion-capture studio The Imaginarium for The Tempest. In doing so, I will demonstrate that The Tempest serves to legitimise the RSC’s status as a competitor and collaborator in the wider digital economy.

MemberSabina Amanbayeva

I am writing a dissertation on laughter and comedy in early modern England, 1590-1610. I am interested in early modern genre, performance practices, theories of comedy/laughter, early modern physiology and most recently, digital humanities. In terms of teaching, I have taught classes on Shakespeare, Surveys of British Literature from Medieval to Renaissance and composition courses – and I am interested in sharing teaching ideas and tools.