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MemberAshley Caranto Morford

Dr. Ashley Caranto Morford (she/her) is a diasporic Filipina-British settler scholar and educator whose work is accountable to and in relationship with Indigenous studies, Filipinx/a/o studies, critical race studies, anti-colonial methods and praxis, and digital humanities. She is an Assistant Professor of English in the Department of Liberal Arts at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Coaquannock (colonially called Philadelphia). Ashley’s current research asks how literature by BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and people of colour) writers can help settler Filipinx/a/os understand how to be better and more accountable kin and relations to Black and Indigenous communities in colonially called North America.

MemberSarah Beetham

…“Activism in the Classroom: Wikipedia and American Art.” Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art 2, no. 2 (Fall 2016).

“From Spray Cans to Minivans: Contesting the Legacy of Confederate Soldier Monuments in the Era of ‘Black Lives Matter.’” Public Art Dialogue 6, no. 1 (2016): 9-33.

“Teaching American Art to American Artists: Object-Based Learning at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.” Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art 2, no. 1 (Summer 2016).

“‘An Army of Bronze Simulacra’: The Copied Soldier Monument and the American Civil War.” Nierika: Revista de Estudios de Arte 4, no. 7 (January-June 2015): 34-45.

“‘A Brave and Gallant Soldier’: Civil War Monuments and the Funerary Sphere.” Common Place 14, no. 2 (Winter 2014).

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Dr. Sarah Beetham is an assistant professor of art history at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, specializing in American art and particularly the monuments erected to citizen soldiers after the Civil War. She holds an M.A. and Ph.D. in art history from the University of Delaware and a B.A. in art history and English from Rutgers University. Her current book project, Monumental Crisis: Accident, Vandalism, and the Civil War Citizen Soldier, focuses on the ways in which post-Civil War soldier monuments have served as flashpoints for heated discussion of American life and culture in the 150 years since the end of the war. Dr. Beetham has published work on Civil War monuments and art history pedagogy in Public Art Dialogue, Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art, Nierika: Revista de Estudios de Arte, and Common-Place. She has been interviewed regarding her work on Civil War monuments and the current debate over the future of Confederate monuments in several outlets, including the Washington Post, U.S. News and World Report, Architectural Digest, and Mic.

MemberPaul Reuther

Paul Reuther is a a painter, a teacher, and an image collections curator. He has been a GWU faculty and staff member since 2004. His creative and research interests tend toward natural perception, hand made, traditional old techniques and processes. In his academic role as a visual resources curator he is focused on digital scholarship and collections and the projects in the semantic web. Paul currently teaches Technical Art History (AH3170) and heads up the Visual Resources Center in the Art History Program Personal website: paulreuther.com

MemberJaleen Grove

My research area is the history of illustration, with a focus on Canada and the United States, 1840-present. Naturally this expands into visual culture, art history, history of the book, and periodical studies. I am also interested in Early Modern print, and I my background before academia was in fine art and graphic design practice.