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MemberSandra Falero

…Digital Participatory Culture and the TV Audience: Everyone’s a Critic, Palgrave-Macmillan, July 2016.

“Fanzines,” Material Culture in America: Understanding Everyday Life,

Helen Sheumaker and Shirley Teresa Wajda, Editors. ABC-CLIO, Publishers.
Published November 2007.

“Popular Culture,” Material Culture in America: Understanding Everyday Life,

Helen Sheumaker and Shirley Teresa Wajda, Editors. ABC-CLIO, Publishers.
Published November 2007.

“Television & Radio Commercials,” Material Culture in America: Understanding Everyday Life, Helen Sheumaker and Shirley Teresa Wajda, Editors. ABC-CLIO, Publishers. Published November 2007.

 

“Mything in Action: Re-envisioning Male Myth/History in the Xenaverse” Journal of the American Papers, Spring 2002: 50-60….

Sandra M. Falero is an American Studies scholar currently teaching courses on Popular Culture, Women, the Cold War, and Television at California State University, Fullerton. My book, available from Palgrave via Springer or Amazon: Digital Participatory Culture and the TV Audience: Everyone’s a Critic

MemberJonathan Sterne

Jonathan Sterne is Professor and James McGill Chair in Culture and Technology in the Department of Art History and Communication Studies at McGill University.  He is author of MP3: The Meaning of a Format (Duke 2012), The Audible Past: Cultural Origins of Sound Reproduction (Duke, 2003); and numerous articles on media, technologies and the politics of culture.  He is also editor of The Sound Studies Reader (Routledge, 2012) and co-editor of The Participatory Condition in the Digital Age (Minnesota, 2016).  His new projects consider instruments and instrumentalities; mail by cruise missile; and the intersections of disability, technology and perception. Visit his website at http://sterneworks.org .

MemberAmelia Chesley

I have a PhD in Rhetoric and Composition from Purdue University. My research and teaching both engage with online communities of participatory knowledge-making and creative work, particularly volunteer groups and projects. I am also interested in intellectual property, remix culture, transdisciplinarity, and digital rhetorics. I teach technical communication at Northwestern State University of Lousiana. Outside of academia, I’ve worked as a graphic designer, web developer, librarian, and editorial assistant. When I have time, I also record audiobooks with LibriVox.

MemberPeter Critchley

I am an intellectual range rider whose research activity embraces a diversity of materials drawn from philosophy, history, political economy, urban studies and social and political ecology. At the heart of my work is a concept of ‘rational freedom.’ This concept holds that freedom is a condition of the appropriate arrangement of the cognitive, affective, interpersonal and intrapersonal dimensions of human life, incorporating essential human attributes from instinct to reason. Defining politics in the ancient sense of creative self-realisation, I affirm a socio-relational and ethical conception of freedom in which individual liberty depends upon and is constituted by the quality of relations with other individuals. I therefore stresses the intertwining of ethics and politics within a conception of the good life. My work is concerned to establish the nature, causes, and conditions of human flourishing. I return philosophy to its key question of what it is to live well as a human being and what it takes for human beings to live well together.

MemberRegina Yung Lee

Regina Yung Lee is a doctoral candidate in Comparative Literature at the University of California, Riverside. Her research interests include feminist theory, sinophone studies, francophone literatures, speculative fictions, and participatory online communities. Currently watching: Community, Uchuu Kyoudai/Space brothers. Currently Reading: Gin no saji/Silver spoon, Otoyomegatari/Bride’s tale.

MemberStephen Charbonneau

Areas of Expertise: Documentary Theory/History, Critical Theory, New Media Studies, Film Theory, Film History/Historiography My work in film and media studies centers on questions of participation, intersubjectivity, collaboration, and everyday life within the context of documentary filmmaking as well as autoethnographic video and essayistic digital cultures. The spark for this direction came from an NYU undergraduate course with the late documentarian George Stoney, which featured a visit from a New York-based youth media organization, the Global Action Project. This organization deployed autobiographical and autoethnographic video production as a way for young people to cope with traumatic social and political issues through collaboration and inspired my article, “Global and Local Selves: (Dis)Placed Youth and Fraught Articulations of Home in the Global Action Project’s Peace of Mind” (Spectator 27.2). This led to a broader interest in the histories, theories, and practices of other NGOs whose work on autoethnographic film/video production had similar pedagogical goals. Additional articles on this front included, “Branching Out: Young Appalachian Selves, Auto-Ethnographic Aesthetics and the Founding of Appalshop,” appearing in the Journal of Popular Film & Television; and “Claims to Be Heard: Young Self-Expressivity, Social Justice, and the Educational Video Center,” in Jump Cut. The above work on the youth media organization, Appalshop, and its inception as a project of the War on Poverty (as a community film workshop) drew me further into a historical line of inquiry to consider understudied community-based and nontheatrical uses of the motion picture, ones that were tethered to postwar struggles for racial equality and deeply engaged with radical democratic principles. This path led, in 2012-13, to my receipt of a Fulbright Fellowship to pursue research on state-sponsored uses of documentary film to mediate and mitigate social conflict fueled by race and class. The result was my first book-length study, entitled Projecting Race: Postwar America, Civil Rights, and Documentary Film (Wallflower/Columbia University Press, 2016). Projecting Race presents a history of documentary filmmaking in the postwar era in light of race relations and the fight for Civil Rights. Drawing on extensive archival research and textual analyses, this book tracks the evolution of race-based, nontheatrical cinema from its neorealist roots (The Quiet One, Palmour Street, and All My Babies) to its incorporation of new documentary techniques intent on recording reality in real time (With No One to Help Us, Another Way, The Man in the Middle, The Farmersville Project, and The Hartford Project). The archival research that contributed to Projecting Race is also animating my second book, a work-in-progress entitled Stoney: A Committed Life, A Committed Cinema. This book will review the life and work of George C. Stoney, whom the New York Times characterized as a “dean of American documentary.” Stoney’s remarkable life and work encompasses much of the twentieth century and represents an intersection of the history of North American social change with the history of cinema. The uniqueness of his story reflects his singular trajectory as a filmmaker whose work was often activist and collaborative, always contesting the boundaries of documentary conventions to feature voices and experiences that are typically rendered invisible in the American public sphere. This continuity to his life and work takes on distinct inflections across the decades, from the late thirties to the 2000s, and through his various filmic, programmatic, and activist endeavors. Alongside these historical inquiries, I am continuing to explore the above themes within the context of contemporary media activist cultures and digital essayistic practices. This includes an anthology, co-edited with Chris Robé, on global media activism, entitled InsUrgent Media from the Front: A Global Media Activist Reader (under review), as well as another book project, The Twenty-First Century Essayistic. Informed by my courses on new media and digital documentary, this latter project is centered on the convergence of essayistic modes of expression and digital media. The historical legacy of the essayistic form, and its fusion of autobiographical expression with commentary on public experiences, has proven to be quite elastic as photographic and cinematic essays were quite common throughout the twentieth century. While there remains much to study about these past adaptations of the essay form, this project essentially looks at the pervasiveness of the essayistic as a frame for a whole range of digital media experiences.

MemberAimi Hamraie

The cover image above shows a black and white sketch drawing of a building exterior, a “proposal for ramped entry” to a court house building in North Carolina drawn by disabled architect Ronald Mace in 1980. The building’s entry has two steps to its glass doors, but a ramp to the side facilitates entry to the same doors by wheels. Two people stand in apparent conversation in front of the doors, their bodies arranged in similar manner to the building’s vertical geometries: columns flanking the doors, as well as serving as aesthetic elements at the upper level. This design was unbuilt. Like the sketch, my work focuses on the relationship between bodies and built environments. I am assistant professor of Medicine, Health, & Society, affiliated faculty in Women’s and Gender Studies, and director of the Mapping Access project and Critical Design Lab at Vanderbilt University. My interdisciplinary scholarship focuses on the historical and ethnographic study of bodies and built environments, applying frameworks from critical and crip disability studies, feminist technoscience studies, and critical design studies. My first book, Building Access: Universal Design and the Politics of Disability, studied the twentieth century shift from design for the average user to design for non-average users culminating in the movement toward Universal Design. My second book project, Enlivened City: public bodies, healthy spaces, livable worlds, examines the biopolitics of global livable cities design. I also direct Mapping Access, a participatory data collection and mapping project focused on promoting accessibility in built environments. Finally, I am a certified permaculture designer working at the intersections of food justice, sustainability, and urban development.