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MemberChance Bonar

I am a PhD candidate in the Committee on the Study of Religion (New Testament and Early Christianity subfield) at Harvard University. My current course and research interests include the historiographical invention and development of the “Apostolic Fathers,” discourses of heresy and orthodoxy in antiquity, Greek and Coptic papyrology, ancient constructions of ethnic and religious difference, and translation of late ancient and Byzantine apocryphal texts. I am in the early stages of my dissertation, focusing on the Shepherd of Hermas.

MemberMatthew Scarborough

I was awarded my Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge (UK) in March 2017 for a dissertation on the linguistic prehistory and historical dialectology of the Aeolic dialects of Ancient Greek. Since October 2015 I have been also collaborating as a research associate with the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (Jena, Germany) on a new database of Indo-European cognate relations. From Fall 2019 to April 2020 I was a sessional lecturer in Classics at MacEwan University (Edmonton, Canada). My research interests can be subdivided into a handful of related topics:

  • Greek language and linguistics (from Mycenaean to the modern spoken language)
  • Ancient Greek dialect studies (from both literary and sub-literary sources)
  • Ancient Greek epigraphy and papyrology
  • Indo-European comparative linguistics and philology (including comparative myth and poetics)
  • Homer and other Early Greek poetry
  • Etymology and the Indo-European lexicon
  • Language classification, cladistics, and subgrouping methodologies in historical linguistics

MemberVincent van Gerven Oei

Vincent W.J. van Gerven Oei received his Ph.D. in Media & Communications from the European Graduate School and Ph.D. in Modern Thought from the University of Aberdeen. He is a philologist and director of scholar-led open-access publishing platform punctum books. He is a specialist of the Old Nubian language and managing editor of Dotawo: A Journal of Nubian Studies. Van Gerven Oei’s publications include A Reference Grammar of Old Nubian (Peeters, forthcoming 2020) and Cross-Examinations (MER. Paper Kunsthalle, 2015). His three-volume work Lapidari (punctum books, 2015) provides the first complete overview of socialist monumentality in Albania. As a translator, Van Gerven Oei works mostly with anonymous Makuritan Nubian scribes and more recent authors such as Jean Daive, Hervé Guibert, Werner Hamacher, Dick Raaijmakers, Avital Ronell, and Nachoem M. Wijnberg. His writings have appeared in Afterall, Glossa, The Journal of Juristic Papyrology, postmedieval, and Theory & Event, among other venues.

MemberReza Huseini

…The International Society for Arabic Papyrology (ISAP)…

Reza’s research focuses on Tukharistan on the eve of the early Muslim conquests with a particular interest in continuity, transition and change after the conquest. He asks why and how the early Muslims went to Tukharistan in the first place. What was so specific about it? How did people in the region respond to the conquests? What were the social and political structures that made the conquests possible? His research is an attempt to provide some answers to these questions. His sources are mainly documents (Bactrian, Sogdian and Arabic), seals, coins and archaeological reports. He also uses  Arabic and Persian historical narratives and Chinese travelogues.

MemberTimothy B. Sailors

Timothy B. Sailors specializes in the academic study of ancient Christianity and its literature. His scholarly work has focused on topics such as the New Testament, textual criticism, the Apostolic Fathers, early Christian apocrypha, patristics, early Christian apologists, and manuscript studies. He has most recently received a grant from the Sarah J. Clackson Coptic Fund through the Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford, to conduct manuscript research at the Bodleian Library; been appointed a U.S. State Department–funded Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) Fellow at the W. F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research, Jerusalem, in order to consult and utilize manuscript collections in the Near East; and been named a Swenson Family Fellow in Eastern Christian Manuscript Studies at the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML) in Collegeville, Minnesota, USA.

MemberRobin Whelan

I am currently Lecturer in Mediterranean History at the University of Liverpool. I am a cultural historian of late antiquity and the early middle ages. My research and teaching focus on the later Roman Empire and its early medieval successors, with a particular interest in issues of religious diversity, social identity, ethnic communities, and political culture. My first book, Being Christian in Vandal Africa (University of California Press, 2018) is about the consequences of church conflict in post-Roman Africa (modern-day Tunisia and Algeria). My current project considers how Christian ideology reshaped the representation and practice of governance in late antiquity. Before coming to Liverpool in January 2018, I was Hulme Humanities Fellow at Brasenose College, Oxford and The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (2014-2018), and a temporary Lecturer in Early Medieval History attached to various Oxford colleges (2016/17).