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MemberSamantha Blickhan

I’m the Humanities Research Lead for Zooniverse. I received my Ph.D. in Musicology from Royal Holloway, University of London, with a thesis on the paleography of British song notation in the 12th and 13th centuries. Though I trained as a musicologist, I’m also a specialist in paleography and manuscript studies, and now I help researchers build crowdsourcing projects on Zooniverse. I’m currently researching best practices in crowdsourced text transcription, but I’m also interested in machine learning, particularly Handwritten Text Recognition. Advocate for open access, accessibility, & education for all. She/her.

MemberEmerson Storm Fillman Richards

 am an advocate for old books and libraries, promoting the Humanities through Special Collections and Archives.  My research has focused for over a decade on medieval literature and culture. I am interested in recovering individuals lives from the material past, using methodology from literary studies and Book History (codicology, paleography, bibliography). I have been working on an illustrated, thirteenth-century Anglo-Norman Apocalypse manuscript, proposing a hypothetical audience and the manuscript would have been read by its culture.

MemberAbigail G. Robertson

I am a PhD candidate in Medieval Studies and a Bilinski Fellow in the English department at the University of New Mexico. My dissertation investigates the life of the legendary St. Swithun of Winchester who served as bishop in life and source for miracles in death. Synthesizing the disciplines of art history, history, architecture, and literature to illustrate the emergence of the cult that surfaced after Swithun’s death, my research details how the remains of the saint influenced the architecture of the cathedral into which his body was ultimately relocated, the religious writing that inspired pilgrims to visit his shrine, and the art objects that sought to represent his holiness in a way that would symbolize with gems and gold the power of his remains. I am also interested in paleography and codicology and how the digital humanities can aid in the enrichment of editing and cataloguing practices for the purpose of editions.

MemberBradley Irish

Bradley J. Irish studies the literature and culture of sixteenth-century England, with a particular focus on the history of emotion.  His first book — Emotion in the Tudor Court: Literature, History, and Early Modern Feeling — draws on literary analysis, archival research, and cross-disciplinary scholarship in the sciences and humanities to interrogate the socioliterary operation of emotion in the Tudor courtly sphere. His research interests include: Tudor political and cultural history; emotions in early modern culture; Henrician literature and culture; Renaissance poetry, especially Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, and Spenser; the Elizabethan courtier poets; Renaissance drama, including Shakespeare; the revenge tragedy tradition; the stoic tradition in Renaissance literature; early modern manuscript culture; paleography and archival research.  

MemberHannah Busch

Hannah Busch is a Ph.D. candidate in the project Digital Forensics for Historical Documents at Huygens ING in Amsterdam. In her thesis, she focuses on the application of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning for the study of medieval Latin paleography. Hannah studied German-Italian studies (B.A./Laurea Triennale) at the Universities of Bonn and Florence, followed by the completion of a M.A. in Textual Scholarship at the Free University of Berlin. Prior to moving to the Netherlands in 2018, she worked as research assistant at the Trier Center for Digital Humanities, where she was a member of the eCodicology-project. Her research interests include large scale digitization of medieval manuscripts, and  experimenting with the application of computational methods that can support and enhance the work of manuscripts scholars. She is member of the Digital Medievalist Postgraduate Subcommittee, and the editorial team of the German science blog Mittelalter – Interdisziplinäre Forschung und Rezeptionsgeschichte.

MemberGillian Gower

Gillian L Gower is a musicologist and medievalist specializing in the cultural history of medieval England and Scotland. Broadly speaking, her research centers the ways in which women and racial minorities use music as a discourse through which to negotiate, challenge, and construct forms of power and authority. Her current book project, Music and Queenship in Medieval England, examines tensions between gender and power in English religious song, ca. 1200-1500. She has also published work on medievalism in popular culture and music paleography. Dr Gower received her PhD in Musicology from the University of California, Los Angeles. She also holds an MA in Music from Hunter College of the City University of New York and a BA from Johns Hopkins University’s Writing Seminars program. At present, Dr Gower is a Research Assistant for the Carnegie Trust-funded digital humanities project Towards a Prosopography of Scottish Musicians before the Reformation hosted at the University of Edinburgh. She previously taught at UCLA and Southern Methodist University.