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MemberTom Peterson

Lying at the heart of my research are the musical manuscripts of the Hugh Nevill collection of Sinhala manuscripts housed at the British Library. Using this archive, my research aims to develop histories that influence our understandings of the place of music in historic Sri Lankan socio-cultural landscapes, including religious, courtly and colonial settings. In the process it aims to contribute to broader historical understandings of Sri Lanka and document the histories of the genres presented in the archive. This archival research will then be brought into conversation with oral histories that emerge during periods of fieldwork conducted among contemporary practitioners of these genres.

MemberHeidi Dodson

…Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH)
American Historical Association (AHA)
Labor and Working-Class History Association (LAWCHA)
Oral History Association (OHA)…

Heidi Dodson is a postdoctoral fellow in the Humanities in the World initiative at the Penn State Humanities Institute. She is a historian who specialized in twentieth-century African American history. Her research interests include community building, social movements, race and landscape, public and digital history, and environmental history. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and has an MLIS from the University of Texas at Austin. Heidi is currently working on a book manuscript based on her dissertation, titled “We Cleared the Land with Our Hands”: Claiming Black Community Space in the Missouri Delta. Her work interrogates the intersections of rural migration, activism, and place in the Border South. Heidi most recently held positions as the CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Scholarship at the University at Buffalo (2018-2019) and Oral History Scholar-in-Residence at the Marian Cheek Jackson Center in Chapel Hill, NC (2017-2018).

MemberBarbara Allen

  • U.S. citizen born in North Carolina, USA.
  • Author, editor, and translator of books, articles, and reviews about the history of the Russian revolutionary movement, Stalinist terror, Soviet trade unions, and the Workers’ Opposition within the Soviet Communist Party.
  • Experience teaching online courses; using Reacting to the Past pedagogy; in oral history methods.
  • Travels include Russia, Ukraine, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Finland, United Kingdom, France, The Netherlands, Turkey, Canada, Mexico.

MemberSean Chambers, MFA

Asst. Prof. of English (Rhetoric, Literature, Creative Writing). Adviser to The VFMC Mask & Spur Drama Careers Society (JD Salinger was a member). Vice President of the Community Breakfast Collaborative of the Main Line (PO Box 135, Villanova, PA 19085). Nonfiction Books Reviewer for Booklist Magazine (Booklistonline.com). Former archivist for editor and publisher Sol Stein. Proud Valiant & Hoo. Director of the Huntington HS Oral History & Documentary Project (2021) about a seminal educational institution for African Americans in Newport News, VA, the professor’s hometown near Christopher Newport U. and Hampton University.

MemberJohanna Mellis

…Association for Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies

North American Society for Sport History

Oral History Association

American Historical Association

Hungarian Studies Association

Memory Studies Association

Réseau D’Études des Relations Internationales Sportives

American-Hungarian Educators Association…
…Co-authored proposal with Dr. Toby Rider for the Junior Intramural Grant at California State University, Fullerton, for the oral history project titled, “Cold War Athlete-Refugees in CA Project.” Summer 2017-2018. Dr. Rider and I are using the grant to conduct interviews with athlete-defectors from Eastern Europe during the Cold War, for transcriptions to be done by CSUF’s Center for Oral and Public History, and for the collection to be deposited in the archives at th…

I am an Assistant Professor of World history at Ursinus College, outside of Philadelphia. I teach courses in World and European history. My courses include “GOAL! Sport in World History, “Nationalism and Memory in Modern Europe,” “Empire, Patriarchy, and Race: Power and People in Modern World History,” “Cold War in Europe: Gender, Labor, and Immigrants,” and “Oral History: Collecting All Voices.” My manuscript-in-progress, titled Changing the Game: Hungarian Athletes and International Sport during the Cold War, explores an uncharted, human aspect of Cold War cultural history: how Hungarian athletes shaped the sport world from 1948-1989. Hungary’s impressive sport history and geopolitical status – it became the third-strongest world sport power under Stalinism and later served the IOC as an intermediary with more contentious Communist countries – make the Hungarian sport community a compelling case study to examine Cold War international culture. The project examines the motivations and evolving relationship between the IOC and Hungarian sport leaders on the one hand, and sport leaders and Hungarian athletes on the other. It argues that international sport was not simply an arena for Communist repression and traditional Cold War cultural and diplomatic tensions to play out. Rather, the manuscript demonstrates how athletes, sport leaders, and the IOC engaged in sporting cooperation with one another in order to achieve their respective aims from the 1960s-1980s. Athletes influenced international sport through their increased agency vis-a-vis, and cooperation with, sport leaders, who in turned worked collegially with the IOC to shape its culture and international policies in order to benefit athletes at home. In one of the first Cold War analyses grounded in athletes’ experiences and memories, I situate their voices in the international sport world by triangulating thirty-five oral histories with Hungarian athletes, coaches, and sport leaders with archival documents from Hungary, Switzerland, and the US. Although typically portrayed as helpless victims or wily resistors, the experiences of Hungarian athletes demonstrate how they asserted agency by choosing to work with sport leaders to improve their lives. Changing the Global Gamedirects scholars of Eastern Europe, Sport History, and the Cold War toward Hungary and demonstrates that histories examining international culture and the Cold War must consider the ways in which people’s actions in the less-contentious Middle Bloc states navigated and shaped the creation of both. My research has been awarded numerous prestigious grants, including the Olympic Studies Centre’s PhD Research Grant, the North American Society for sport History Dissertation Travel Grant, and a Fulbright Grant. I have also received several Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships to study Hungary.  

MemberStylianos (Stelios) Giamarelos

Dr Stylianos (Stelios) Giamarelos is an architect, historian and theorist of postmodern culture. Before undertaking a PhD in Architectural History & Theory at the Bartlett School of Architecture UCL, he studied Architecture, Philosophy, and History of Science and Technology in Athens. He is currently a Teaching Fellow and module coordinator in Architectural History, Theory & Interdisciplinary Studies at the Bartlett School of Architecture UCL. A founding editor of the Bartlett’s LOBBY magazine (2013-2016), he is also a General Editor for the EAHN’s Architectural Histories since 2017. In 2008, he co-curated ATHENS by SOUND, the National Participation of Greece in the 11th Biennale of Architecture in Venice. Among others, he has published in the Journal of Architecture, Journal of Architectural Education, Architectural Design, Footprint, OASE, FRAME, San Rocco, and Metalocus. In 2018, he was a Judge for the international Undergraduate Awards and a finalist runner-up for the biannual EAHN Publication Award. Research Areas include: postmodern and digital architectural cultures; transcultural authorships of regional architectures; oral histories in architecture; philosophy, science, technology and narrative (from comics and literature to videogames) in architectural histories, theories and practices.

MemberLaura Maria De Vos

I am an international student from Belgium working on my dissertation in the interdisciplinary fields of Indigenous Studies and American Studies at the University of Washington English department in Seattle. I received my MA in English Literature and Linguistics and my MBA in Cultural Management from the University of Antwerp, Belgium. My research argues that Indigenous ways of knowing offer under-considered analytical tools for reading across the entire terrain of U.S. literature, especially in the second half of the 20th century. I have volunteered with the Quinault Indian Nation Elder program in different capacities since 2014, and am now working specifically on an intergenerational digital oral history project with the Quinault elder program and the Taholah high school. I teach undergraduate courses at the University of Washington in Native American literatures and research methods.