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MemberHenriette Roued-Cunliffe

I am an associate professor in the Section of Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums (GLAM), Department of Communication, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. I teach, research, and write about digital heritage, such as:

  • open data in the heritage sector
  • participatory heritage communities online (like family historians)
  • GLAM (Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums) openness and online interaction

MemberAnne Clinio

Member of Education, Information and Communication Vice Presidency team of Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Fiocruz). Member of Fiocruz Open Science Working Group, collaborating on the collective formulation and execution of Fiocruz’s institutional strategy for its open science policy, with focus on open data. Member of Interdisciplinary Laboratoty on Information and Knowledge. Participant in the Open Leaders program of the Mozilla Foundation (2019). Cover photo by Profile photo by Medialab Prado Flickr cc-by-sa

MemberJames Tauber

I work at the intersection of computing, philology, and linguistics both as an independent scholar and as a software developer working on digital humanities projects with other scholars. My interests include morphology (theoretical, computational, and historical), Indo-European linguistics, Linguistic Linked Open Data, text encoding and annotation of historical language corpora (especially Ancient Greek but also Old English and Old Norse), machine-actionable language description, computer-aided historical language learning (especially Ancient Greek but also Old English and Old Norse).

MemberPaige Morgan

Paige Morgan is the Digital Humanities Librarian at the University of Miami. Before joining the University of Miami she held a CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Sherman Centre for Digital Scholarship at McMaster University in Ontario. She completed her PhD in English and Textual Studies at the University of Washington, where she developed the Demystifying Digital Humanities curriculum with Sarah Kremen-Hicks and Brian Gutierrez through a grant from the Simpson Center for the Humanities. Paige’s research interests include data modeling for humanities subjects, linked open data, social infrastructure for digital scholarship, emotional labor in tech contexts. She has served as a consultant and data wrangler on a variety of projects, including the CLIR microgrant project Identifying Early Modern Books (IdEMB). She teaches workshops and short courses on DH at training events such as DHSI and DH@Guelph. You can find her writing on topics related to digital humanities and libraries, as well as 18th and 19th century English poetry in journals such as Romanticism, Romantic Circles, and DH+Lib.

MemberSpencer Keralis

…e Social History of the American Family. Sage Publications, 2014
 “Pets.” The Social History of the American Family. Sage Publications, 2014
 “The Denton Declaration: An Open Data Manifesto.” Open Access @ UNT. September 2012
Reprinted in Research Data Management: Principles, Practice, and Prospects. Washington, D.C.: Council on Library & In…

Spencer D. C. Keralis is a scholar of the past, present, and future of the book. Dr. Keralis is the Founder and Executive Director of Digital Frontiers, a conference and community that brings together the makers and users of digital resources for humanities research, teaching, and learning. Founded in 2012, the conference celebrates it’s 8th anniversary at the University of Texas at Austin in September 2019. Dr Keralis is currently Assistant Professor and Digital Humanities Librarian with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign University Library. Dr. Keralis previously served as Research Associate Professor and Head of the Digital Humanities and Collaborative Programs Unit with the Public Services Division of the University of North Texas Libraries. He also served a lecturer in the School of Arts, Technology, and Emerging Communication at the University of Texas at Dallas, as an adjunct instructor in the UNT Department of English, and has taught in the UNT i-School. He holds a Ph.D. in English and American Literature from New York University. His research has appeared in Book History, a special issue American Periodicals on children’s periodicals, and in the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) reports The Problem of Data (2012) and Research Data Management: Principles, Practices, and Prospects (2013). Dr. Keralis’s work on labor ethics in digital humanities pedagogy is forthcoming in Disrupting the Digital Humanities, and the Modern Language Association publication Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments. Dr. Keralis has held a Mellon Fellowship at the Library Company of Philadelphia, a Legacy Fellowship at the American Antiquarian Society, a Summer Residency at the Queer Zine Archive Project, and served as a CLIR Fellow in Academic Libraries with the University of North Texas Libraries. In 2017, he was honored with the Innovative Outreach Award for the Digital Frontiers project by the Texas Digital Library.