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MemberJanneke Adema

I am an Assistant Professor in Digital Media at the Centre for Disruptive Media at Coventry University. My research focuses on the material-discursive practices of scholarly research and communication. In my work I critically analyse alternative models of scholarly communication such as open access publishing and living, liquid and remixed books: publishing experiments that try to challenge ideas of authorship, the fixed text, copyright and originality, as well as the system of material production surrounding the book. I try to engage with these new forms both in theory and in practice, where I perform my own research in an alternative, digital, and open way, by publishing it online as it develops, and by experimenting with different, remixed, multimodal and multiplatform versions of my work. In this way I want to rethink the way we do research and how we publish it to avoid uncritically repeating what have become our dominant scholarly practices.

MemberConnor Doak

I have been a lecturer in Russian at the University of Bristol since 2013. I  am currently serving as Head of Subject in the Department of Russian & Czech. In broad terms, my research explores the relationship between literature and life, art and society, language and power. My area of specialization is Russian literature, culture and society from the Romantic period to the present day. I have a particular interest in cultural manifestations of gender and sexuality, especially the treatment of masculinity in experimental texts in literature and film. I have published on queer aspects of Dostoevsky’s novels, on fatherhood in Chekhov’s short stories, and contested national identities and histories in Pushkin and Byron’s narrative poems. I am currently working on a monograph on masculinity and power in the work of Vladimir Maiakovskii. The book deconstructs the popular image of Maiakovskii as a ‘manly’ poet, a myth propagated not only by the writer himself, but by generations of critics in both Russia and the West, seduced by his work, and in possession of a powerful, but unarticulated and uncritical, gender essentialism. The book goes beyond the cliché of Maiakovskii as a manly poet, showing how he uses verse to negotiate the shifting terrain of masculinity in revolutionary Russia and the early Soviet period. My teaching covers a broad range of topics and themes in Russian literature and culture from 1800 to the present, with occasional forays into earlier periods. At upper levels, my teaching includes research-based classes such as ‘Gender in 20C and 21C Russia’, ‘Writing Revolution: Russian Literature 1910-1940’, and ‘Russia and the World since 1991’. My approach to teaching is explicitly interdisciplinary and comparative, and I regularly contribute to comparative literature and culture teaching both at undergraduate and graduate level. I also have experience teaching Russian language at all levels.