Search

MemberMatthew Averett

…itus orbis erat’: The Political Rhetoric of Bernini’s Fountains in Piazza Barberini,” The Sixteenth Century Journal 45:1, 3-24. 2013    “The Annual Medals of Pope Urban VIII Barberini,” American Journal of Numismatics Second Series 25, 303-331. 2012    “Barberini Political Identity and Utilitarian Architecture in the Rome of Urban VIII.” Discoveries 29:1. 2012  “Bernini’s Triton Fountain: War and Fountains in …

Matthew Knox Averett is Associate Professor of Art History at Creighton University.  His recent publications include “’Redditus Orbis Erat’: The Political Rhetoric of Bernini’s Fountains in Piazza Barberini” in the Sixteenth Century Journal (2014) and “The Annual Medals of Pope Urban VIII Barberini” in the American Journal of Numismatics (2013).  Dr. Averett edited and contributed to a collection of essays entitled The Early Modern Child in Art and History, which was published by Taylor & Francis in 2015.  Dr. Averett is currently completing work on a book on Bernini’s Triton Fountain and the artistic patronage of Pope Urban VIII.

MemberEmma Herbert-Davies

I am currently completing an MA in Medieval Studies at the University of Leeds. My undergraduate dissertation explored how horses were used in manuscript art to reflect the status and gender of their riders. My master’s dissertation carries on the equine theme through a study of violence and injury to horses in medieval tournaments. I will begin my PhD in September and my thesis will be based on researching the equestrian equipment used in tournaments and warfare, with a focus on horse armour. My supervisors will be Dr Alan Murray (University of Leeds) and Dr Karen Watts (Royal Armouries, Leeds). I have ridden, trained and competed horses for most of my life and also have a keen interest in numismatics, having spent much of my undergraduate time cataloging and digitising the University of Leeds coin collections (@winchestercoins).  

MemberCarl R. Rice

I am a doctoral candidate in Yale University’s combined program in ancient history. I first graduated from West Virginia University in 2013 with two bachelor’s degrees (history and religious studies), then from North Carolina State University in 2016 with a master’s degree in history.   My dissertation project, titled “Religio Licita: Empire, Religion, and Civic Subject, 250-450 CE,” explores the question of normative religion and its role in shaping the subjects of empire in the third, fourth, and fifth centuries. Drawing on an array of primary sources (including historiography, oratory, legal texts, numismatics, and material culture), I argue that the late Roman state became increasingly concerned with policing the boundaries of permissible religio and employed a variety of coercive strategies to enforce conformity. My dissertation project examines the development and articulation of this normative discourse and its consequences for the empire’s subjects.   In addition, I am interested in gender and sexuality studies in the Roman and late Roman worlds, social and cultural histories of antiquity more broadly, and exploring various critical approaches to ‘doing’ ancient history. I also enjoy thinking about various strategies for teaching the ancient world in a modern university classroom.   Please feel free to write me at carl.rice@yale.edu.

MemberAdele Curness

My research interests lie in the textual and material culture of Byzantine and Norman Italy, particularly relating to questions of community structure and ethnic and religious identity on the imperial frontier with Islamic North Africa. My thesis focuses especially on synthesising the Arabic sources for Byzantine Italy with their Greek and Latin counterparts, and I aim to show that, through relationships between Italo-Greek Christians and different religious and ethnic communities, the westernmost Byzantine province of Calabria was deeply connected to the Fatimid world of North and sub-Saharan Africa, certainly more so than its connection to the imperial centre at Constantinople. In this vein, my MPhil thesis analysed the construction of authority in Calabrian hagiographic texts and Arabic documents from Tunisia, observing the ways in which the highly stylised portrayal of the ‘holy man’ revealed tensions in local society between Orthodoxy, loyalty to the imperial government, and the attractions of the Islamic world. My secondary interests are the reception and portrayal of the far south of Italy in modern Italian cultural discourse and the life of Matilda of Canossa. I am interested more broadly in Byzantine and Early Medieval history, hagiography, historical geography, numismatics, and cultural history. I am always keen to debate comparative questions on the history of religious pluralism and identity in frontier societies. Outside of my academic research, I am determined to improve the accessibility of Byzantine Studies to students and lay-readers alike. I am passionate about the translation of foreign-language sources into English, and work on this myself, and about challenging the underlying Eurocentric assumptions in medieval studies that lead to Byzantine history being relegated from medieval curricula. I would be delighted to be contacted by western medievalists wishing to work collaboratively on this matter. I am the president of the Oxford University Byzantine Society.

MemberNicholas S.M. Matheou

I am a social historian specialising in the Middle East and Mediterranean in the Middle Ages, particularly Anatolia, Upper Mesopotamia and Caucasia (approximately modern-day Turkey, Armenia, Georgia and Azerbaijan, as well as parts of northern Syria and Iraq). In particular my research focuses on the empire of New Rome (“Byzantium”), Armenian and Georgian polities in the central Middle Ages, and the city of Ani, between the ninth to and fourteenth centuries. I also takes a comparative perspective across the region, especially from Kurdish and Ottoman studies, as well as globally, from pre-history to the modern day. Through this research I theorise social-historical themes of hegemony and counterpower, ethnicity and nationhood, and critical political economy before, during and after the rise of capitalism. I aim towards a radical perspective on social history from an anarchist – that is, a methodologically anti-state – standpoint. I received my first degree in Ancient & Medieval History from the University of Edinburgh, before moving to the University of Oxford to complete first a master’s degree in Late Antique & Byzantine Studies, and then a doctoral dissertation in the Faculty of Oriental Studies titled ‘Situating the History attributed to Aristakes Lastiverc‘i: The Empire of New Rome & Caucasia in the Eleventh Century’. During my time as a postgraduate student I co-founded the international research network The Long History of Ethnicity & Nationhood at The Oxford Research Centre for the Humanities (TORCH), running a number of workshops, conferences and seminar series. At the IHR I will focus on developing my doctoral research into a monograph, and begin a new project titled ‘“The Fate of Unjust Cities”: Global History, Political Economy & the Abandoned City of Ani, 900-1400’. This radical global history and political economy of the abandoned city of Ani in central South Caucasia, modern-day eastern Turkey, will situate the city’s emergence, development and decline between the tenth and fourteenth centuries in macro regional and interregional transformations, particularly the Mediterranean Commercial Revolution and the emergent world-system generated by Mongol Eurasian hegemony, in connected micro analysis of developing social relations in the urban space. The project draws on Ani’s rich material remains, particularly the large corpus of monumental epigraphy, as well as numismatics, ceramics and architectural remains, supplemented by Armenian, Georgian, Greek and Islamic (Arabic & Persian) literary sources. Exploring and theorising the political economy of different state-systems, long durée histories of commercial capitalism, and subaltern resistance framed through the heuristics of hegemony and counterpower, the project touches on historical and social themes relevant across time and place.   Normal 0 false false false EN-GB KO X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:”Calibri”,sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

MemberAlejandro G. Sinner

…    Novedades epigráficas de Ilduro (Cabrera de Mar, Barcelona). Palaeohispanica 18, 203-216 (Co-authored with J. Ferrer)
 
2018      Yet more coins of the Pompeian Pseudomint from France. American Journal of Numismatics 30, 117-130 (Co-authored with C. Stannard and J. A. Chevillon)
 
2017     Rural religion, religious places and local identities in Hispania: the sanctuary at Can Modolell (Cabrera de Mar, Barcelona). Jo…

I am an Assistant Professor of Roman Art and Archaeology in the Department of Greek and Roman Studies at the University of Victoria. My research covers the social, economic and cultural history of Roman Spain, and my publications include books and articles in peer reviewed journals exploring Ibero-Roman material culture (especially ceramics and coinage), demography, Palaeohispanic languages, pre-Roman and Roman domestic and religious spaces, and the construction of identities and the processes of cultural change in ancient colonial contexts. Since 2006 I am digging at the ancient site of Ilduro (Cabrera de Mar, Catalonia) in northeastern Spain, where I am also directing a research project and leading an international archaeological field school.  

MemberMischa Hooker

…lychronius of Apamea and Daniel 11: Seleucid History through the Eyes of an Antiochene Biblical Interpreter.” Forthcoming in R. Oetjen and F. X. Ryan (eds.), Seleukeia: Studies in Seleucid History, Archaeology and Numismatics in Honor of Getzel M. Cohen. Berlin: De Gruyter, 2018.

John Lydus, On the Months (De Mensibus), 2nd ed. 2017. [translated, annotated, and with a scholarly introduction] [Review: McAlhany]

Origen of Ale…

https://hcommons.org/members/mischahooker/

MemberErica Hayes

Erica Hayes is a Digital Scholarship Librarian at Villanova University, where she leads Falvey Memorial Library’s digital scholarship program and supports faculty and students interested in integrating digital tools and methods into their research. Prior to joining Villanova University, she was an NCSU Libraries Fellow based in the Copyright & Digital Scholarship Center and User Experience Department at the NC State University Libraries. While she was working at NCSU, she was the project manager on the Immersive Scholar Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant. Her research interests include digital pedagogy, digital humanities, GIS, scholarly communication, contemporary poetry, women studies and material culture in the long 18th century.