Search

MemberAstrid Marner

My current research focuses on Old Norse/Latin bilingualism in medieval manuscripts. The project is funded by the European Commission through a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellowship (Horizon 2020). Its title is “Tracing the Invisible. Old Norse and Latin in medieval manuscripts” with the acronym INVISIBILIA. Before that, I was a member of the project “From manuscript fragments to book history” at the University of Bergen. This project was funded by Bergen Research Foundation (BFS). There, I was working on office lectionaries, which from Norway are only preserved in fragmentary form, and the Nidaros Ordinal in its various preserved form. This work is still going on. Other research activities cover sermon preaching in medieval Iceland and Norway, fourteenth-century Skálholt as a cultural hub the distribution and use of Peter Comestor’s Historia scholastica in the North, and Grimr Holmsteinsson’s Jóns saga baptista II.

MemberPeter Ferry

I am Associate Professor of English at the University of Stavanger, Norway. I am currently working on a book project for Routledge on beards and masculinity in American literary history. Previously, I was an Irish Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow at University College Dublin, Ireland (2015-2017). My project focused on the transnational flâneur and masculinity in early American Literature. My PhD thesis (Queen’s University Belfast, 2013) was published as Masculinity in Contemporary New York Fiction with Routledge in 2015. I have published a range of articles on such topics as New York flâneurs, Freud and masculinity, fatherhood, and the sociological value of studying men and masculinities.

MemberMads Langballe Jensen

…of the early reception of Grotian and Post-Grotian natural law in late seventeenth and early eighteenth century Denmark-Norway. This the first in depth study of the establishment of natural law as an academic discipline as well as its polit…

I am a historian of early modern political thought, working on topics from the German Reformation to the Early Enlightenment and from Denmark/Norway to the Coast of West Africa. I am particularly interested in how different theories of natural law were used to justify and legitimise interests in different religious, political, commercial and colonial conflicts in early modern history.   My first project was a contextual study of the political philosophy of the Wittenberg reformer Philipp Melanchthon and the first formulations of Protestant natural law theories. It investigated the different theories of natural law which Melanchthon developed and the purposes for which he applied (or didn’t apply) them in his political philosophical works. An early fruit of this project was an article on Melanchthon’s commentary on Aristotle’s Politics published in History of Political Thought.

MemberPatrik Bye

I’m associate professor of English Language and Linguistics at the University of Nordland in Bodø, Norway. For many years I taught general (theoretical) and English linguistics at the University of Tromsø, where I was an associate of CASTL (Center for Advanced Study in Theoretical Linguistics). The focus of my research has been phonology (language sound structure), especially how phonological knowledge interacts with other cognitive systems that subserve language, including the lexicon and syntax. More recently I’ve turned to the ways in which the categories and structures of language presuppose and are influenced by interaction with the physical and social environment, as well as how language, understood as a discrete combinatorial system, shapes the human lifeworld. My latest project applies linguistics to understanding poetic effects.

MemberStefan Fisher-Høyrem

…om Cultural Conflict 2.0, a three-year project on digital media and cultural conflict funded by the Research Council of Norway based at the University of Agder, Norway, and the University of Amsterdam.
Presentations can deal with the follo…
… and to what extent social media is reshaping social relations in culturally diverse areas of large and small cities in Norway, Denmark and the Netherlands. We especially look at how cultural conflict is created, circulated, handled and dea…

I am a researcher on the project Cultural Conflict 2.0 which is headed by Professor David Herbert. The project investigates the development of cultural conflicts, as well as production and reproduction of social order, via social media, collective rituals, city promotion and planning, etc. in different cities in Denmark, Norway and the Netherlands. My research interests are located at the intersection of modern social and technological history, historiography and theory of history, and secularity studies and political theology. As a historian of modernity, I am interested in the material technological/performative mediation of “modern” concepts of temporality, autonomy, and immanence. I have taught modules in the theory of history, religious studies, culture and communication, worldview pluralism, and philosophy of science. I have lectured on rhetoric, nineteenth-century British history, and theories of secularity and secularisation.

MemberKristel Zilmer

…15-… Member of the Board of the Section for Source Publications (Kjeldeskriftkommisjonen) at the National Archives of Norway, representing the discipline of runology

2015-… Country representative for Norway, International Advisory Bo…
…Western Norway University of Applied Sciences…

Working with: runology, epigraphy, medieval media and textual culture, literacy studies, Old Norse philology, Old Norse narratives and their modern reception, historical multimodality. Teaching courses on language, literature, textual culture, on BA-, MA- and PhD-level.