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MemberDaniel Estrada

My research sits at the intersection of technology and the mind.  I write on everything from robotics and AI to the politics of digital culture. My dissertation defends a conception of machine participation inspired by Turing’s discussion of the Lady Lovelace objection and the enactivist approach to cognition. I’m interested in the implications of Turing’s view for contemporary debates over machine autonomy. More generally, I’m interested in the organization of complex networks of diverse participants. At the social level this manifests as an interest in digital politics and internet culture. At the metaphysical level this manifests as an interest in network theory and the unification of the sciences. I teach Engineering Ethics at NJIT. I write continuously on G+ and FB.

MemberIan D. Morris

I’m a historian of early Muslim societies. In 2013–16 I was a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow at the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), working as part of an international collaborative project called Power and Institutions in Medieval Islam and Christendom (PIMIC). Over the course of this project I spent time as a visiting researcher at Panthéon-Sorbonne, Paris; the School of Oriental and African Studies, London; Tel Aviv University; and the Netherlands Institute in Turkey, Istanbul. In 2017–19 I’ve been teaching undergraduate tutorials in Medieval and Middle Eastern History at St Andrews.

MemberSam Reenan

Sam Reenan is a Lecturer in music at Hamilton College and a Ph.D. candidate in music theory at the Eastman School of Music. He holds the M.A. in music theory from Eastman (2018) and the B.M. in music theory and the B.S. in biological sciences from the University of Connecticut (2014). A recipient of Eastman’s 2017–18 TA Prize for Excellence in Teaching, he has taught throughout the Eastman curriculum, most recently serving as supervisor for Sophomore Aural Musicianship. Sam is co-author of a 2016 article exploring seventh-chord voice-leading transformations, published in Music Theory Online. His dissertation focuses on issues of genre, large-scale form, and narrative in early modernist Germanic works described as “maximalist.” He has presented spoken papers on a range of topics including pitch structure in Henri Dutilleux’s Ainsi la Nuit (Music Theory Society of New York State, Ninth European Music Analysis Conference, 2017), theoretical approaches to sonata form in Mahler’s late symphonies (Society for Music Theory, 2018, 2020), T. W. Adorno’s analytical aesthetics (Music Theory Midwest, 2019), graduate instructor peer observation (Pedagogy into Practice, 2019), and commercial jingles (Society for American Music, 2020). Sam has been editorial assistant with Music Theory Online since 2016 and is a past co-editor of Intégral, where he led the journal’s transition to an online, open-access format. Outside of music theory, he enjoys sampling local coffee roasters, running, biking, rock climbing, hiking in the Adirondacks, and attending operas at the Met.

MemberValentina DENZEL

  Valentina Denzel is an Associate Professor of French Literature (17th and 18th century) at the Department of Romance and Classical Studies at Michigan State University. Her fields of interest are Italian and French Literatures (15th – 18th century), Queer and Gender Studies, Querelle des femmes, the libertine novel, travelogues, and popular cultures. In her book Les mille et un visages de la virago. Marfisa et Bradamante entre continuation et variation, Garnier Classique 2016, she analyzes the evolution of the representation of the woman warrior in French and Italian literatures from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment by taking into consideration the political and historical context of this evolution and the symbolic value of the woman warrior in each specific time period. Valentina’s second book project examines the impact of the Marquis de Sade on the punk and post-punk movements, as well as on punk-porn feminism and comic books in France, the UK, and the US.