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MemberRob Collins

…us and the Frontier: The Form and Function of Phallic Imagery Along Hadrian’s Wall’, in R. Collins & T. Ivleva (eds.), Un-Roman Sex, London: Routledge, 274-309
2019        ‘Hadrian’s Wall: Current Research and Future Directions’, in Wall to Wall: Conservation, Management, and Interpretation for the Public on Hadrian’s Wall and the Great Wall of China, CACH/Historic England/Newcastle University, 220-231
2019        Stocks, C, Birley, B. and Collins, R. ‘Stories from the Frontier: Linking Past and Present at Vindolanda through Digital Gameplay’, Thersites 8: 97-109
2019       ‘Roman Britain in 2018: 3. Hadrian’s Wall; 4. Northern England’, Britannia 50: 416-428
2019       ‘Stone-carved phalli: A typology’, Roman Finds Group Datashee…

Rob is a Senior Lecturer (equiv. Assoc. Prof.) in Archaeology in the School of History, Classics & Archaeology at Newcastle University. Prior to joining Newcastle, Rob was a Finds Liaison Officer for the Portable Antiquities Scheme.

MemberChristopher Jenks

Christopher Jenks received his graduate degrees from George Mason University and Newcastle University (England).  Before arriving at the University of South Dakota, he taught at the City University of Hong Kong, Newcastle University, and Konkuk University (Seoul, South Korea).  He specializes in the political and cultural implications of the global spread of English.  His research interests include multiculturalism, critical race theory, translingualism, postcolonialism, neoliberalism, and national identities.  His eight published and forthcoming books cover a range of topics, including chat room interaction, intercultural communication, and second language acquisition. His 2010 edited collection on second language acquisition was runner-up for the 2011 British Association for Applied Linguistics (BAAL) Book Award. He is currently working on a project that examines how roadside billboards of the Midwest represent discursive spaces for national identity construction.

MemberDavid Hope

…Newcastle University | University of London…

I am an economic historian specialising in the history of British overseas trade circa 1700 to 1850. I am particularly interested in the connections between commerce, colonialism, and consumption through the study of chartered trading companies, commodities, merchants, and distribution. As Economic History Society Anniversary Fellow — a one-year postdoctoral position co-sponsored by the Economic History Society, Newcastle University, and the Institute of Historical Research (School of Advanced Study, University of London) — I am writing my first monograph on the subject of the late-eighteenth and early nineteenth-century British Atlantic fur trade: a publication that advances my doctoral thesis beyond the records of the Hudson’s Bay Company by using new research into Scottish-Canadian merchant papers undertaken in Montreal, Ottawa, and Winnipeg over the summer of 2018. By locating the British fur trade within the wider ‘Atlantic World’, the book explores what this trade suggests about the institution of empire, the emergence of an integrated Atlantic economy, and the circulation of commodities in an era of protoglobalisation and burgeoning consumerism. I joined Newcastle University in October 2016 as a Teacher in History after completing my doctorate at Northumbria University. I have taught widely on the history of Britain, Europe, the Americas, and world empires at Newcastle, Northumbria, and Teesside Universities.

MemberTiago Sousa Garcia

…Animating Text Newcastle University (ATNU)

http://research.ncl.ac.uk/atnu/

https://twitter.com/AnimatingTextNU…

I joined Newcastle University in 2017 as a Research Associate to ‘Animating Text’ (AtNU), a interdisciplinary research project interested in the future of scholarly digital editing and the digital humanities. Before joining Newcastle, I received a doctorate from Text and Event in Early Modern Europe (TEEME), an Erasmus Mundus Joint Doctorate awarded by the University of Kent and the University of Porto, Portugal. I had previously completed an MA in Anglo-American Studies and a BA in Languages, Literatures and Cultures (Portuguese and English) at the University of Porto. Parallel to my academic career I have also worked in the private sector, first as a computer programmer working in encryption and communication protocols, and later as an assistant editor to a small publishing house in Portugal.

MemberLawrence Davies

…Culture’, paper presented at Rhythm Changes VI: Jazz Journeys, University of Music and Performing Arts Graz, 13 April 2019

‘Blues Encounters and Exchange Between London and Chicago, 1958-1960’, paper presented at Music Colloquia Series, King’s College London, 13 February 2019

‘The Meanings of Place in Alan Lomax’s 1947 Blues Interviews’, paper presented at Recording in Place, Newcastle University, 16 November 2018

‘“God Has Given Me the Gift for Writing Blues”: Authorship, Value, and Identity in the Life and Work of Blues Songwriter James Oden (1903-1977)’, invited paper presented at Valuing Music: Anthropology of Music Master Class, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, 27-30 June 2018

‘Revivalist Ideologies in British Traditional Jazz, c. 1940-55’, …
…International Centre for Music Studies, Newcastle University…

I am a researcher, pianist, and harmonica player specialising in the history of the blues. My research focuses on the international circulation of African American music and the changing political, economic, and moral values of musical production and consumption during the twentieth century. I am a Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow at the International Centre for Music Studies at Newcastle University, working on a project entitled Global Blues: Performance, Politics, and Meaning 1980-2016. I completed my PhD – entitled British Encounters with Blues and Jazz in Transatlantic Circulation, c.1929-1960 – in April 2018. In the 2018-19 academic year, I was a postdoctoral researcher in jazz and popular music studies at the Institute for Jazz Research at the University of Music and Performing Arts, Graz.  

MemberLiam Peter Temple

I was born and raised in Darlington, attending Carmel RC College before studying at both undergraduate and postgraduate level at Northumbria University, Newcastle. I am currently the Capuchin Fellow in the History of Catholicism at Durham University. Before this role I had taught at Durham, Northumbria and Sunderland as an Associate Lecturer and had also developed my skills in engagement and digital design in roles outside of academia.