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MemberTimothy B. Sailors

Timothy B. Sailors specializes in the academic study of ancient Christianity and its literature. His scholarly work has focused on topics such as the New Testament, textual criticism, the Apostolic Fathers, early Christian apocrypha, patristics, early Christian apologists, and manuscript studies. He has most recently received a grant from the Sarah J. Clackson Coptic Fund through the Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford, to conduct manuscript research at the Bodleian Library; been appointed a U.S. State Department–funded Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) Fellow at the W. F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research, Jerusalem, in order to consult and utilize manuscript collections in the Near East; and been named a Swenson Family Fellow in Eastern Christian Manuscript Studies at the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML) in Collegeville, Minnesota, USA.

MemberChance Bonar

I am a PhD student in Religion (New Testament and Early Christianity) at Harvard University. I graduated from Yale Divinity School with a Master’s degree in Bible and St. Olaf College with a bachelor’s degree in Religion, Classics, and Ancient Studies. My current course and research interests include constructions of authorship and attribution in antiquity, the Nag Hammadi codices, discourses of “fake/forgery,” the rhetoric of “heresy/orthodoxy,” textual criticism, contemporary uses of the “historical Jesus,” and issues surrounding cultural heritage in antiquities markets.

MemberJohn Meade

John Meade lives in Phoenix, AZ where he teaches at Phoenix Seminary. He has coauthored The Biblical Canon Lists from Early Christianity: Texts and Analysis (Oxford: Oxford University Press, forthcoming Nov. 2017) and he has edited the materials for A Critical Edition of the Hexaplaric Fragments of Job 22-42 to be published by Peeters late this year or early next for the Hexapla Institute. He plans to continue researching in the areas outlined under “Projects” below. He teaches and mentors students at the seminary, recognizing the holistic nature of education as character formation. His courses include Introduction to Old Testament/Hebrew Bible; the Hebrew Language sequence from Introduction to Exegesis (Isaiah, Job, Proverbs); electives in Biblical Theology, Formation of the Biblical Canon, Readings in the Septuagint, and Readings in the Apocrypha/Deuterocanon.

MemberDaniel Glover

I’m a Ph.D. student in New Testament at Baylor University. My research interests include the Gospel of Mark, narrative and redaction criticism, early Christian and Jewish use of the Old Testament, and the the relation of Judaism and Christianity in the first four centuries. In addition to reading and writing, my hobbies include playing tennis, guitar, and disc golf.

MemberRonald Troxel

From January, 1991 through May, 2016 I taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I began as academic staff but eventually transitioned to tenured faculty, achieving the rank of Professor by retirement in May, 2016. I taught undergraduate courses in beginning and intermediate Biblical Hebrew, introductory courses in Hebrew Bible and Early Christian Literature, Prophets of the Bible, History-telling in the Bible, Jewish Literature of the Greco-Roman Period, The Gospels, and Pauline Christianity. In our graduate program in Hebrew Bible I taught year-long studies on the Hebrew books of the Pentateuch, Isaiah, Ezekiel, and Job, Advanced Hebrew Grammar and Composition, Syriac Language and Literature, and graduate seminars on The Book of the Twelve, Philology and Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible, and Jewish Hellenistic Literature. I continue to guide the work of dissertators and serve on dissertation defense committees. In the fall of 2017 I will join the Minister of Faith Formation at Wayzata Community Church, Rustin Comer (Ph.D. candidate in theology at Claremont Graduate University) in offering a full curriculum of biblical and theological courses in the church’s adult education program. From January, 2010 through May, 2014 I served as chair of the Department of Hebrew and Semitic Studies, overseeing the transfer of its program of modern Hebrew into the Jewish Studies Program and the merger of the program in Hebrew Bible with Classics to form a Department of Classical and Near Eastern studies.