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MemberPhillip Webster

I use the study of early forms of Christianity and Judaism to tease out the applications and potentialities of various theoretical approaches and questions, including those inspired by “New Materialism,” Feminist, Transgender, and Queer Theory, M. Foucault, phenomenology, and Science and Technology Studies. My book project examines references to the soul in Greek and Roman antiquity, with the aim of exploring the effects, functions, and power of the ancient soul’s phantom-like presence upon ancient bodies. In my teaching, I like to introduce my students to big, interdisciplinary questions through the study of early Christian and Jewish histories and their receptions in modernity.

MemberJosef Barla

I am a postdoc researcher in the Biotechnology, Nature and Society Research Group at the Institute of Sociology at Goethe-University Frankfurt. In 2017, I was an affiliated researcher of The Seed Box: A Mistra-Formas Environmental Humanities Collaboratory based at Linköping University in Sweden. I am also co-chairing the New Materialisms on the Crossroads of the Natural and Human Sciences working group of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology Action IS1307 “New Materialisms: Networking European Scholarship on ‘How Matter Comes to Matter‘” (PI Iris van der Tuin). My work focuses on questions at the intersection of the ethics and politics of technology and the technosciences, science and democracy, environmental justice as multispecies justice, and feminist epistemology. I completed my PhD in Philosophy of Technology at the University of Vienna in 2016.

MemberMariela Mendez

I am an Associate Professor of Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Studies and Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of Richmond. My research engages comparative literary studies and feminist and queer theories to interrogate representations of genders and sexualities in print culture throughout Latin America. In particular, I address the various ways in which women writers have used the press to craft alternative spaces of cultural, aesthetic, and political intervention that disrupt heteronormative ideologies. I teach at the intersection of Latin American Studies, Transnational Feminisms, Queer Theory, and Feminist New Materialisms, and I am also interested in the political potential of a transnational feminist critical practice.

MemberJacob Erickson

Jacob J. Erickson has lectured in theological ethics at Trinity since 2016. He previously taught Religion and Environmental Studies at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota, USA. Alongside theologian Marion Grau (Norwegian School of Theology), he chairs the Sacred Texts, Theory, and Theological Construction Unit and serves on the Steering Committee for the Martin Luther and Global Lutheran Traditions Unit for the American Academy of Religion.   His research and teaching interests include:

  • Ecotheology, Environmental Ethics, and the Environmental Humanities
  • Queer Theologies and LGBTIQ Ethics
  • Theology in Posthumanism and New Materialism
  • Lutheran Theology and Ethics

Erickson is currently working on an extended project on the intersections of global warming and theology called A Theopoetics of the Earth: Divinity in the Anthropocene.  He’s also working on an introductory text on sexuality and queer theological ethics.

MemberDB Bauer

DB Bauer is a PhD student in Women’s Studies, a graduate assistant with the Design Cultures and Creativity Honors Program, and a Digital Studies in the Arts and Humanities graduate certificate student at the University of Maryland, College Park. DB has a background in technical media production and has worked for PBS, public radio, and other freelance outlets. DB’s scholarly work focuses on the relationship between digital technologies and notions of the human, centralizing issues of gender, affect, embodiment, and critical or scholarly maker practices, specifically using 3D printing, and more recently, virtual reality. DB uses scholarly making to position technology as both research object and research tool. Areas of interest: digital humanities;  critical and scholarly making; 3D printing(new) media studies; speculative literature, art, and design; affect; gender performance and embodiment; queer theories; new materialisms; feminisms.  

MemberTaylor R. Genovese

Taylor R. Genovese draws on his background in sociocultural anthropology and political theory as a doctoral student in the Human and Social Dimensions of Science and Technology (HSD) program at Arizona State University, where he is pursuing his interest in the social imaginaries of human futures on Earth and in outer space. He is doing so by pulling from the intellectual and applied traditions of abolition democracy, new materialisms, critical secular studies, relational ethics, performance studies, multimodality, Marxism, and anarchism. His dissertation work focuses on producing a genealogy of futurist discourse surrounding human immortality and space travel. He is tracing the legacy of these ideas from the Proletkult movement as well as from the Russian Cosmists, a loose-knit esoteric political-spiritual-artistic group operating in the decades surrounding the Russian Revolution. He is interested in the ways in which utopian ideas rooted in human solidarity get transmuted into the egocentric dreams of the wealthy through declensionist narratives.