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MemberHeather D Baker

… Babylonia, funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) (2009–2015)
BatCUL: Babylonian Texts Concerning the Urban Landscape (on ORACC, in preparation with graduate student assistance funded by the University of Toronto’s Work Study Program)
Nappahu: Digital Corpus of Neo-Babylonian Texts from the Nappahu Archive (on ORACC, in preparation)
Neo-Assyrian Bibliography (on Zotero)
PNAo: The Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire Online (on ORACC)

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… ‘Wirtschaft und Verwaltung in Babylonien.’ In N. Crüsemann, M. van Ess, M. Hilgert & B. Salje (eds), Uruk – 5000 Jahre Megacity, pp. 275–281.
Baker, H.D. 2013. ‘Testament. 1 Jt.’ Reallexikon der Assyriologie 13/7–8: 611–613.
Baker, H.D. 2012. ‘The Neo-Babylonian empire.’ In D.T. Potts (ed.), A Companion to the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East, 2 vols. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 914–930.
Baker, H.D. 2011. ‘From street altar to palace: reading the built environment of urban Babylonia.’ In K. Radner & E. …

As an Assyriologist who has also trained in archaeology and gained considerable experience of Near Eastern excavation, my primary interest is in combining textual information and material culture in the study of Mesopotamian society and economy. I apply this approach to the study of the Babylonian city and to investigating house and household. I am currently PI of an international project, Machine Translation and Automated Analysis of Cuneiform Languages (MTAAC), funded by SSHRC through the Trans-Atlantic Platform Digging into Data Challenge. Research Interests My work focuses on the social, political and economic history and material culture of 1st millennium BC Mesopotamia, with a particular interest in Babylonian urbanism and the built environment, and in the Neo-Assyrian royal household. My research and publications cover the following topics:

  • urbanism and the built environment
  • religious architecture
  • house and household
  • integration of textual and archaeological data
  • Hellenistic Babylonia (especially the city of Uruk)
  • the Assyrian royal palace and household
  • onomastics and naming practices
  • prosopography
  • slavery
  • society and economy
  • political history
  • cuneiform archives and archival practices

Employment

  • 2014–present: Assistant Professor in Ancient Near Eastern History, Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations, University of Toronto
  • 2009—2014: Senior Postdoc and PI of project “Royal Institutional Households in First Millennium BC Mesopotamia,” Institut fūr Orientalistik, University of Vienna
  • 2003–2009: Postdoc, START Project “The Economic History of Babylonia in the First Millennium BC,” Institut fūr Orientalistik, University of Vienna
  • 1999–2002: Research Associate, State Archives of Assyria Project, University of Helsinki; from July 1999, Editor-in-Charge of The Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire
  • 1993–1998: Editorial Assistant/IT Assistant (part-time), A Lexicon of Greek Personal Names (a British Academy Major Research Project)
  • 1994–1995: Curator Grade G (part-time), Department of the Middle East, the British Museum
  • 1984–1989: Field Archaeologist employed on various excavation and post-excavation projects in England, Cyprus, Turkey, Jordan, and Iraq

MemberJacob Lauinger

Jacob Lauinger is an Assyriologist who focuses on Akkadian cuneiform texts of the first and second millennium B.C with an interest in peripheral (i.e. extra-Mesopotamian) dialects of Akkadian.  His research focuses on the social, legal, and economic history of the ancient Near East and, in particular, on approaching cuneiform tablets from both philological and archaeological perspectives in order to better define the social contexts in which they were written, used, and stored. In this regard, he is fortunate to serve as the epigrapher for three archeological excavations, Koç University’s Tell Atchana (Alalah) Excavations, the University of Toronto’s Tayinat Archaeological Project, and the Sirwan Regional Project’s Khani Masi Excavations.  His first book (Following the Man of Yamhad, Brill 2015) explored questions of land tenure and political territoriality at Middle Bronze Age Alalah, while his curreent book project focuses on the Satue of Idrimi from Late Bronze Age Alalah.

MemberDaniel McClellan

…e Study of Religion. Edited by Brad Stoddard. Sheffield; Equinox, 2018.

“Cognitive Perspectives on Early Christology.” Biblical Interpretation 25.4–5 (2017): 647–62.

“Review of Susan Niditch, The Responsive Self: Personal Religion in Biblical Literature of the Neo-Babylonian and Persian Periods.” Journal of Hebrew Scriptures 17 (2017): 1–2.

“Review of Thomas Römer, The Invention of God.” Journal of Hebrew Scriptures 17 (2017): 1–2.

“Review of James S. Anderson, Monotheism and Yahweh’s Appropriation of Baal.…

I recently received my PhD from the University of Exeter, where I am wrote my doctoral dissertation under the supervision of Francesca Stavrakopoulou. My dissertation treats the concept of divine agency in the Hebrew Bible through the methodological lenses of cognitive linguistics and the cognitive science of religion. More specifically, it interrogates the notion of communicable agency as represented by the ark of the covenant and the messenger of YHWH. My thesis at Trinity Western University interrogated the conceptualization of deity in the Hebrew Bible through the application of cognitive linguistic frameworks. Among other things, it concluded that the conceptual category of deity was not clearly delineated and extended well beyond the traditional dichotomous view of deity as “Wholly Other.” My thesis at the University of Oxford, “Anti-Anthropomorphism and the Vorlage of LXX Exodus,” examined the case for translator exegesis in the so-called anti-anthropomorphic variants in the Septuagint. It was awarded the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies’ annual award for “Best Dissertation.” While my primary areas of specialization are early Israelite religion, textual criticism, and Second Temple Judaism, my work in cognitive linguistics and the cognitive science of religion has expanded my research interests into broader studies of religion, religious identity, and linguistics. I currently work for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as a scripture translation supervisor, and for Brigham Young University as an adjunct instructor of ancient scripture.