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MemberÓscar Iván Useche

The relations between Economics and Literature in Spain’s Restoration Period. The theoretical and philosophical dialectic between positivism and literature in Spanish Naturalism. The tensions between Science and Catholicism in Spain’s fin de siècle. The influence of science, technology and industry on the Spanish literature and culture. The appropriation of mathematical concepts in debates over the religion-science tension in nineteenth-century Spain.

MemberNicole Rizzuto

Statement of Interest as Candidate for MLA’s Executive Committee LLC 20th and 21st Century English and Anglophone Literatures My interest in serving on the Executive Committee for Twentieth and Twenty-First Century English and Anglophone Literatures stems from my ongoing research within these fields and from my commitment to addressing the changing structure of the profession and its effects on knowledge production and scholarly activity. I take the current ideological and financial pressures placed on the humanities and literary studies occurring in the context of ecological and employment crises as challenges to be met on a number of fronts. I will work toward fomenting an inclusive atmosphere in the organization of sessions, panels, and other scholarly activities to encourage dialogue among all ranks of teacher-scholars across racial, gender, ethnic, sexual, and class identifications. I am interested in supporting a range of scholarship that foregrounds methodological debates about interpretative practices and ways of reading colonial, postcolonial, and neocolonial modernities; scholarship that reflects on the protocols of disciplinary and cross-disciplinary formations in era of an increasingly globalized and digitalized literary studies; and scholarship that considers how these debates, practices, and protocols are shaped by precarities emergent with the contraction of employment opportunities and resources for those working in the fields of twentieth and twenty-first century literatures. I will work to encourage the participation of graduate students, Early Career Researchers, and independent scholars in reimagining the intellectual landscape of the field and its professional practices. Finally, given the unevenly experienced effects of the climate crisis, I will support environmental humanities work that foregrounds marginalized perspectives while reconfiguring the boundaries of humanistic thought through engagement with social sciences, natural sciences, and science and technology research.

MemberWilko Graf von Hardenberg

My main disciplinary affiliation is environmental history, but I could also be termed a social historian, a historical geographer, or a digital humanist. My most recent research activities focus on the social history of the environment and on the history of science. In particular, I look at conflicts about rights to access resources, the history of nature conservation, and the development of the concept of mean sea level.

MemberDana Simmons

I am a historian of science and technology. My research interests include hunger, nutrition, political economy, the human sciences, feminist theory and technopolitics. My book, Vital Minimum: Need, Science and Politics in Modern France, traces the history of the concept of the “vital minimum”–the living wage, a measure of physical and social needs. In the book I am concerned with intersections between technologies of measurement, such as calorimeters and social surveys, and technologies of wages and welfare, such as minimum wages, poor aid, and welfare programs. How we define and measure needs tells us about the social authority of nature and the physical nature of inequality. I am faculty co-organizer of the UCR Science Studies group, which is committed to building a community inclusive of indigenous, minority and marginalized knowledge makers in STS.

MemberBrian W. Ogilvie

I am an intellectual and cultural historian of Europe, with special interests in the history of science, scholarship, and religion from the Renaissance through the Enlightenment. I am currently Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and Chair of the History Department. I have previously served as Graduate Program Director and Associate Chair/Scheduling Officer in History, as Co-Director of the Digital Humanities Initiative in the College of Humanities and Fine Arts, and as Director of the university’s Oxford Summer Seminar. I am engaged in several research projects in cultural history and the history of science. I teach Renaissance and early modern European history, history of science, and history of religion.