Search

MemberSantiago Ortiz

I´m a historian interested in Digital Humanities and focused in nineteenth century history of Colombia. My research encompasses the study of coleccionism and documental archives formed by intelectual elites in South America from a data science perspective that includes Natural Language Processing, Network analysis, Machine Learning, Spatial analysis and geocoding and deep neuralnetworks to automatically transcribe images of personal letters between collectors and contributors.

MemberBen Miller

Ben Miller completed his PhD in Comparative Literature at Emory University (2009).  Prior to joining the faculty at Emory in 2018, Dr. Miller held positions at Georgia State University, the University of North Florida, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Georgia Institute of Technology.  Dr. Miller’s primary scholarly focus is in the digital humanities, natural language processing, collective memory and identity, and computational narratology.  His work has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Department of Defense, and others, and has appeared in Digital Scholarship in the Humanities, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, and Cityscape.

MemberRyan Taycher

I am a music theorist exploring the nature of tonal structures and their ornamentation in the late Middle Ages. In my dissertation, “De fundamento discanti: Structure and Elaboration in Fourteenth-Century Diminished Counterpoint,” I examine the compositional process described (both explicitly and implicitly) in the earliest counterpoint treatises in order to develop a historically-rooted methodology for structural analysis.

MemberShiloh Drake

My research investigates the structure of the lexicon, how words and morphemes are processed, and how we arrive at meaning. I conduct this work with English-, Maltese-, and Arabic-speaking populations, which enables me to explore morphological and lexical processing not only in monolingual populations but also in bilingual populations. I am also interested in morphological processing in clinical populations, such as people with Specific Language Impairment, Williams Syndrome, primary progressive aphasia – semantic variant, and people who have suffered from traumatic brain injury.

MemberJoseph Jakubowski

I teach music theory in the Harvard Music Department and research process and ambient music of the latter twentieth and early twenty-first centuries (minimalism, spectralism, electroacoustic, ambient). My goals are analytical: drawing on recent theories of event cognition, embodied cognition, and ecological perception, I investigate the in-time musical experience of form, time, meter, timbre, and meaning. I contextualize broad questions about the nature of musical experience in narrow instances of processual, spatial, and interactive musical experiences. I have recently published or presented research on the role of metric cognition in Grisey (MTO, 2018; SMT, 2019); aspects of embodiment and formal perception (Intégral, forthcoming); and the development of spectral community and discourse through memorials to Grisey (Spectralisms conference, 2019). I am currently developing a monograph investigating process and ambient thinking since 1950 across genres and styles, from Stockhausen and Messiaen to Hans Abrahamsen and Laurie Spiegel. The book’s working title (quoting a Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith track) is “Existence in the Unfurling”: Theorizing Process and Ambient Music, 1950-2020.