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MemberLuna Najera

Areas of interest: Spanish and Latin American cultural studies (early modern and colonial); gender studies; second language acquisition; community engagement. Her journal articles have focused on early modern war, surveillance, gender, and other themes.  Born in Guatemala, she grew up in Los Angeles. She earned a Ph.D. in the Department of Romance Studies at Cornell University, and a B.A. from Hampshire College. Her faculty appointments have included Vassar College, Trinity College, University College Utrecht, and Radboud University (The Netherlands).

MemberSierra Lomuto

I am an Assistant Professor of English at Macalester College, where I also hold a Consortium for Faculty Diversity Postdoctoral Fellowship (2018-2020).  My teaching and research interests focus on medieval histories of global contact and the literature they engendered; the formation of racial ideologies in the Middle Ages; and contemporary appropriations of the medieval past. I am currently working on my first book, Exotic Allies: Race, Literature, and the Construction of Mongols in Medieval Europe. I earned my Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, an M.A. and B.A. from Mills College, and I’m a former community college student from the San Francisco Bay Area.

MemberRachel Stauffer

Currently I am an instructor of Russian and Spanish at James Madison University. I have taught Russian language, literature, culture, and/or cinema at the University of Virginia, the University of Richmond, Northern Virginia Community College, and Ferrum College. Since 2013, I have worked as the Conference Manager for the American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages (AATSEEL). In addition to teaching, I am also currently pursuing a M.Ed in Equity and Cultural Diversity in the JMU College of Education.

MemberMichael Noble

I am interested in the deployment of academic and scientific expertise in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. My doctoral research explores how University College Nottingham responded to the crisis of the First World War and, in particular, how its research staff were recruited or volunteered to contribute their expertise to the war effort. The project examines two strands:

  • The effect of wartime conditions on the College. This strand includes assessments of the absence of male students and staff of military age, the financial implications of these absences and restructuring of the organisation in response.
  • The contribution made by the College to the national war effort. This includes the provision of specialised training courses for military recruits and munitions workers, the use of College buildings and equipment for war work and the contribution of the College’s specialist technical expertise to the war economy. It also includes an assessment of the relationship between the College (and individual researchers) and industrial organisations, such as Cammell Laird, Rolls-Royce and British Dyestuffs Ltd.

I set these effects and contributions in the context not only of the College’s trajectory of development but also of the wider changes in higher education and research in early twentieth century Britain. Project themes include the history of science, state-organised research, the history of education, the First World War, urban networks, technology and innovation.   I have expertise in university-public engagement, including the brokering and management of productive working relationships between researchers and non-university partners; the planning and delivery of outreach and engagement events, both on and off campus; development and administration of co-production research projects and research project management.   I am responsible for project management and community liaison for the Centre for Hidden Histories, an AHRC-funded First World War Engagement Centre. In this role I have administered over 25 co-production research projects, organised and delivered public outreach events across the UK and established a nationwide network of academic researchers and community leaders. I regularly run history education sessions for primary and secondary school pupils.   In 2016 I organised Beyond the Western Front: The Global First World War, a two-day conference that blended academic papers with a showcase of community group projects. I provide advice and consultation for academics and non-university partners interesting in collaboration and co-production.   I am the author of two non-fiction children’s books on historical topics: D-Day: 20 Real Life Stories of the Normandy Invasion (Quarto Kids, 2019) and The Secret Life of Spies (Quarto Kids, 2020)  

MemberLaura Sanders

In addition to teaching as an adjunct for community colleges in Oregon and California, I currently serve as teaching learning center coordinator, online English faculty mentor, and community-based learning coordinator. I have taught composition and rhetoric at private research institutions, small liberal arts colleges, state universities, and community colleges. In recent years, I have served as co-editor of an accreditation self-study, interim grants officer, and academic department assessment coach. Combining my passions for professional development and social justice, I continue to seek the sweet spot between digital humanities and online community-based learning.