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MemberSamantha Elizabeth Bassler

I am a musicologist specializing in cultural studies of early modern English music, music and disability studies, and the historiography of early music. I am currently pursuing an alternative academic career as an adjunct professor in New York City, a freelance editor and professional indexer, and I own and operate and teach private and small group music lessons at Stellar Music Space in Brooklyn, NYC. I am also a certified yoga teacher specialising in modifications and routines for chronic pain and disabilities.

MemberNate Ruechel

I am a PhD student in historical musicology at Florida State University. Broadly conceived, my research interests include 20th and 21st century American music culture, the ethics of historiography, and the overlap between structures of authority, political discourse, and aesthetic significance. My master’s thesis centers on Aaron Copland’s early symphonic jazz in the context of his transnational musical training and unique social position.

MemberChristopher Campo-Bowen

Christopher Campo-Bowen is an Assistant Professor/Faculty Fellow in the Department of Music at the NYU Faculty of Arts and Science. He completed his Ph.D. in musicology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He holds a B.A. in Music with honors in conducting from Stanford University and an M.M. in Orchestral Conducting from The Catholic University of America in Washington D.C. He is also active as a viola player, singer, conductor, and translator. Christopher’s research focuses on music in the Habsburg Monarchy in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, especially on the relationships between music, ethnicity, gender, and empire. He is particularly interested in the music of the composers Bedřich Smetana, Antonín Dvořák, and Leoš Janáček and how conceptions of ruralness in Czech opera structured notions of subjectivity and identity. His current project investigates the institutional and imperial relationships between Prague and Vienna in the context of operatic performance and exhibition culture. He has published articles in the journals Nineteenth-Century Music and Cambridge Opera Journal and presented at various national and international conferences, including the annual meeting of the American Musicological Society, the Council for European Studies annual conference, the North American Conference on Nineteenth Century Music, and the Branding “Western Music” conference hosted at the Universität Bern. Christopher received a Fulbright grant for the Czech Republic to perform dissertation research; he has also held a Howard Mayer Brown Fellowship from the American Musicological Society and was the recipient of a Council for European Studies Mellon Dissertation Completion Grant.

MemberJoao Silva

I am a musicologist whose current research focuses on popular entertainment and music in Portugal. I am especially interested in the ways a mass leisure culture was created and linked to the idea of both nation and cosmopolitanism. The way technologies such as recorded sound and film interacted with the urban auditory landscape under the sway of modernity is also an important part of my work, which studies how boundaries between the stage, the city’s streets and the home were crossed by an ever-changing musical repertoire. Theatrical songs, urban popular music, traditional music, film music and dancing music were commodifiend and became part of Lisbon’s everyday life, revealing a constant negotiation between local, regional, and transnational styles.

DepositLessons in Diversity and Bias

There is an urgent need for social justice. This need expands far beyond the walls of an information literacy classroom, but there is important work that can be done in these spaces. Lessons designed to stimulate student’s critical thinking about their personal assumptions and latent biases by using different kinds of information sources is one way music and instruction librarians can advance equity and inclusion through teaching. In this active-learning session, attendees will participate in several condensed lessons designed to challenge their worldview in order to facilitate the uncovering of unknown biases. At the same time, they will learn pedagogical techniques for the information literacy classroom by experiencing them first hand. The activities will include conceptualizing disability in the arts, investigating bias in the music industry, and examining reference works to uncover hegemony in the historiography of the canon. All activities will push participants (and hopefully their future students) to think critically about information, especially music and the arts, through the lens of diversity, inclusion, and social justice.

MemberBryan Wagner

My primary research focuses on African American expression in the context of slavery and its aftermath. I have secondary interests in legal history, cultural theory, and popular music. My first book, Disturbing the Peace: Black Culture and the Police Power after Slavery, a study of black vernacular expression and its entanglement with the law, was published by Harvard University Press in 2009. I’m currently working on two books: Fables of Moral Economy, a close analysis of African-derived global traditions engaged with problems of property and subsistence, and Fugitives, Contrabands, Spies, Servants & Laborers, an experiment in historiography that imagines the new social history of slavery from the standpoint of its source materials.

MemberAlejandro L. Madrid

Alejandro L. Madrid is author or editor of books and edited volumes about the intersection of modernity, tradition, globalization, and ethnic identity in popular and art music, dance, and expressive culture of Mexico, the US-Mexico border, and the circum-Caribbean. Working at the intersection of musicology, ethnomusicology, and performance studies, Madrid’s work interrogates neoliberalism, globalization, and postmodernism while exploring questions of transnationalism, diaspora, and migration; homophobia and constructions of masculinity; embodied culture; and historiography, narrative, biography theory, and alternative ways of knowledge production in music and sound practices from the long twentieth century. In 2017, he was awarded the Dent Medal for “outstanding contributions to musicology” by the Royal Musical Association and the International Musicological Society. He is the only Ibero-American to have received this award since its inception in 1961. He is also the recipient of top prizes from the Latin American Studies Association, the American Musicological Society, the ASCAP Foundation Deems Taylor/Virgil Thomson Awards, the International Association for the Study of Popular Music-US Branch, and Casa de las Américas, among others, as well as fellowships and grants from the American Council of Learned Societies, the Ford Foundation, and the Fulbright Program. Madrid is currently professor of musicology and ethnomusicology at Cornell University’s Department of Music. He is the editor of the series Currents in Iberian and Latin American Music for Oxford University Press, and is regularly invited as guest professor at universities in Argentina, Chile, Cuba, Mexico, and Uruguay. Most recently, he served as music advisor to acclaimed director Peter Greenaway, whose latest film, Eisenstein in Guanajuato, is set in 1930s Mexico.