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MemberAntje Gamble

…Marino Marini and Italian Modernism: Italian Sculpture Before and After WWII
Book Chapters:
(2020) “Exhibiting Italian Democracy in the 1949 “Twentieth Century Italian Art” at the Museum of Modern Art,” in The First Twenty Years at MoMA 1929-1949, Eds. Sandra Zalman and Austin Porter. London: Bloomsbury Press. (in press)
(under review) “Fascism Lite on Display at MoMA’s 1949 Twen…
…Ph.D., 2015, University of Michigan: Doctor of Philosophy in History of Art

M.A., 2008,  School of the Art Institute of Chicago: Master of Arts in Modern Art History, Theory, and Criticism

B.A., 2005, University of Wisconsin-Madison: Bachelor of Arts in Art History with a Certificate in Religious Studies…
…nd Nancy Bartlett, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Museum of Art.
Exhibition Reviews:
2019 Review: “Metaphysical Masterpieces 1916-1920: Morandi, Sironi, and Carrà” at the Center for Italian Modern Art, Italian Art Society Bulletin XXX, 1 (Winter 2019), 4-5.
2009 Review: “A Case for Wine: from King Tut to Today (The Art Institute of Chicago, July 11-September 20, 2009),” Chicago Arti…

My work examines the exhibition, sale, and critical reception of Italian art and how it shaped and was shaped by national and international socio-political shifts. My scholarship has been included in the recent volume Postwar Italian Art History Today: Untying ‘the Knot’ (Bloomsbury Press, 2018), where her chapter titled “Buying Marino Marini: The American Market for Italian Art after WWII” looks at politicized collection practices during the early Cold War. I also have two forthcoming essays: one on the 1949 exhibition “Twentieth Century Italian Art” at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) for a book due out late 2019 (The First Twenty Years at MoMA 1929-1949, Eds. Sandra Zalman and Austin Porter. London: Bloomsbury Press.), and another on the 1947-48 ceramic Crocifisso by Lucio Fontana for a 2020 Art Institute of Chicago (AIC) exhibition catalogue.

MemberValerie Connor

Valerie Connor is a freelance visual arts curator and educator. She has served as Chairperson of the National Campaign for the Arts and was Commissioner-Curator for Ireland at the 50th Venice and 26th São Paulo international art biennials. She has served on the board and acquisitions committee of the Irish Museum of Modern Art and was the Visual Arts Adviser to the Arts Council/An Chomhairle Ealaíon. She contributed a contextual essay to the Twentieth Century volume of Art and Architecture of Ireland, published by the Royal Irish Academy and Yale University Press, and co-edited Local Authority, with Dr Daniel Jewesbury, a book of critical essays on European public art commissioning strategies, published by Fingal County Council Arts Office. As part of the photography programme team within the School of Media at the Dublin Institute of Technology, she delivers modules in visual studies, curating photography, photographic practice and dissertation supervision. She is an external examiner for Limerick School of Art and Design at Limerick Institute of Technology and is currently undertaking an MSc in applied postgraduate study in online learning, having previously studied fine art at the National College of Art & Design and women’s studies at Trinity College Dublin. 

MemberHeather Jensen

Heather Belnap Jensen is associate professor of art history at Brigham Young University. Her research focuses on women in the art world of post-Revolutionary France and transatlantic culture and Mormonism, c. 1900, and she is currently working on book projects in these areas. Jensen is the co-editor, along with Temma Balducci and Pamela Warner, of Interior Portraiture and Masculine Identity in France, 1789-1914 (Ashgate, 2011) and its pendant volume, Women, Femininity, and Public Space in European Visual Culture, 1789-1914 (Ashgate, 2014). Undergraduate courses that Professor Jensen frequently teaches include methods of art history, nineteenth-century European art, modern art, contemporary art, and women in art and visual culture. Jensen is a member of the executive committee for the BYU Women’s Studies program, where she oversees WSTAR, its faculty research group; she is also on the BYU European Studies executive committee and chairs the BYU London Centre faculty oversight committee. Jensen currently serves on the College Art Association’s Committee for Women in the Arts and is a regional representative for The Feminist Art Project.

MemberJustin Greenlee

I earned my bachelor’s degree from Kenyon College (2009) and a masters in Art History from the University of Alabama (2014). My thesis, “Quod vocatur Paradiso: The Pigna and the Atrium of Old St. Peter’s,” focused on the monumental ancient bronze pigna, or pinecone, that was once the unifying water feature of a fountain located in the atrium of the church of Old St. Peter’s in Rome. I studied the pigna‘s eighth-century incorporation into the church and examined how the sculpture’s addition to the forecourt led to the creation of a new architectural term – the paradiso – that reflected Old St. Peter’s emergent status as a center for pilgrimage and papal influence.   Prior to joining the Department of Art History at the University of Virginia as a doctoral student, I was a Eugene McDermott Educational Intern at the Dallas Museum of Art, a Teaching Assistant at the Pantheon Institute in Rome, an International Intern for the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, Italy, and a grant writer for the Nashville Cultural Arts Project: Seed Space. My ongoing research pertains to topics in late medieval and early modern art in Italy, specifically objects that are created, acted on, and restored many times – works that frustrate a study of the moment of creation and require an analysis that moves across time and geographic borders.   At the University of Virginia, I concentrate on topics involving art and cultural interchange between Italy and Byzantium, particularly as it relates to members of the Byzantine émigré Basil Bessarion’s (b. Trebizond c. 1408, d. Ravenna 1472) humanist academy in Rome, relics and reliquaries, and the art and architecture of Crusade. I am also a member of Tomorrow’s Professor Today, the Society of Fellows, the Praxis digital humanities program in the Scholars’ Lab, the Graduate Student Public Humanities Lab at UVA, and served as the coordinator of UVa’s Interdisciplinary Graduate Medieval Colloquium.   Research Interests   Italian art, Byzantine art Late medieval and early modern art Rome in the fifteenth century Basil Bessarion (b. Trebizond c. 1408, d. Ravenna 1472) Relics and reliquaries Liturgical objects, religious ritual, and procession The Later Crusades Layered objects and sites History of humanism and the humanities Digital humanities, digital art history, public humanities Public art

MemberMarco Martinez

I specialize in modern Latin American and Latinx literatures and cultures. My research and teaching interests focus on artistic displacements, cultural translation, the global circulation of the arts, and dialogues between literature, visual arts, music, and dance. My current book project, Aesthetics of Displacement: Mexican Artists in the Modern Metropolis, studies the contributions of poet José Juan Tablada, cartoonist Miguel Covarrubias, choreographer José Limón, and music theorist Carlos Chávez to New York’s modern art scene from 1920 to 1950. This study analyzes the ways in which different experiences of displacement—such as exile, migration, and foreignness—modify intellectual and artistic projects. I argue that in all four cases these experiences served to create an aesthetic of displacement, that is, an aesthetic that capitalizes on ethnic, racial, and social differences to establish cross-cultural ties between the artistic communities in both countries. By attending to their specific structures and effects and establishing an active relationship between the four different kinds of arts (literature, visual art, dance, and music), this book reflects on a socio-cultural exchange between Mexico and the U.S. that goes beyond the border, or “frontera”, paradigm. In this sense, the Mexico City-New York City connection also re-envisions the geography of international modernism and the global circulation of the arts as a process of constant displacement. In published articles and courses I have taught, I have also been working on three other lines of study. The first one considers the representation of “tipos populares” in nineteenth-century photography in Mexico, Peru, and Brazil. The second examines the political imagination of “mexicanidad” in contemporary Mexican and Chicanx graphic novels. The last one demonstrates my interest in the relationship between sport and modernity in Latin America.