Search

MemberMichael Miller

I’m a researcher and teacher, in the broad area of philosophy and religion. Slightly narrower, my specialism is Judaism, and narrower still I focus on Jewish mysticism and modern Jewish thought (from Soloveitchik to Benjamin, Rosenzweig, Levinas, et al). However I’m stubbornly interdisciplinary and usually try to cross the boundaries between different aspects of philosophy and speculative thought as well as trying to keep up with current research in scientific, linguistic and psychological fields which connect with my interests. Keeping it broad helps to revitalise intellectual disciplines and keep them exciting. The other area I’m increasingly focusing on in my research and teaching is Black Judaism, especially the Hebrew Israelite movement. I’m also very interested in experimenting with the forms of research, writing and teaching – making these practices more accessible, more artistic, more willing to think outside the usual boxes.

MemberErin D. Graff Zivin

Erin Graff Zivin’s research and teaching interests focus on constructions of Jewishness and marranismo in the Luso-Hispanic Atlantic, aesthetic representations of torture and interrogation, the relationship between ethics, politics and aesthetics (particularly in the context of Latin American literary and cultural studies), and the intersection of philosophy and critical theory more broadly. She is the author of “Figurative Inquisitions: Conversion, Torture and Truth in the Luso-Hispanic Atlantic” (Northwestern University Press, 2014) and “The Wandering Signifier: Rhetoric of Jewishness in the Latin American Imaginary” (Duke University Press, 2008), and the editor of “The Ethics of Latin American Literary Criticism: Reading Otherwise” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007). In addition, Graff Zivin has published articles in Modern Language Notes (MLN), SubStance, CR: The New Centennial Review, Politica Comun: A Journal of Thought, the Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies, Variaciones Borges, the Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies, Chasqui, the Journal of Jewish Identities and Modern Jewish Studies.

MemberGeoffrey Claussen

… of Compassion for all Creatures.” In Ehyeh Asher Ehyeh, ed. David Birnbaum and Martin S. Cohen (New Paradigm Matrix Publishing, 2019), 241–264.
“The Exodus and Some Possibilities of Jewish Political Thought,” co-authored with Emily Filler.  In T&T Clark Handbook of Political Theology, ed. Rubén Rosario Rodriguez (T&T Clark, 2019), 301–316.
“War, Musar, and the Construction of Humility in Modern Jewish Thought.” Interreligious Studies and Interreligious Theology, vol. 2, no. 2 (2018): 216-242.
“Two Orthodox Approaches to Vulnerability and the Exodus Narrative: The Stranger in the Writings of Irving Greenberg and Meir Kahane.” Studies in Judaism, Humanities, and the Social Sciences vol. 2, no. 1 (forthcoming, 2018).
“Constructing Interreligious Studies: Thinking Critically about Interfait…

https://hcommons.org/members/gclaussen/

MemberHeath Dowers

As a student of political philosophy and theory, Heath has held a long interest in the intersection between religion and politics, recognizing early modern political theorists’ grappling with core religious precepts and how these ideas shaped their paradigms. This interest began to surface as he studied Islamic political thought within the coursework of his undergraduate studies. Noting that the Arabs placed a premium on the classical wisdom of the ancient Greeks, he desired to acquire classical languages (Latin and Greek) to further augment his interests. He received his master’s degree in Classics after which he taught Latin at a secondary school in Arizona. Heath returned to his academic pursuits in 2019 when he gained admission into the University of Dallas as a graduate student in the Politics Department. Within this environment, he hopes to research Medieval Islamic and Jewish political thought of the Abbasid era.

MemberJonathan Sarna

Jonathan D. Sarna is spending this year as a fellow of the Israel Institute for Advanced Studies.  Ordinarily he serves as University Professor and the Joseph H. & Belle R. Braun Professor of American Jewish History at Brandeis University, where he chairs its Hornstein Jewish Professional Leadership Program. He also is the past president of the Association for Jewish Studies and Chief Historian of the National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia.  Author or editor of more than thirty books on American Jewish history and life, his American Judaism: A History won six awards including the 2004 “Everett Jewish Book of the Year Award” from the Jewish Book Council. Sarna is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Academy of Jewish Research. His most recent books are When General Grant Expelled the Jews and Lincoln & the Jews: A History (with Benjamin Shapell), which has just appeared in a Hebrew edition. 

MemberJosef Meri

Born in the United States Prof. Meri hails from a Jerusalemite family. Meri is presently a faculty member of the College of Islamic Studies, Hamad Bin Khalifa University in Doha, Qatar. He is also Faculty Associate (non-resident) at the Center for the Study of Jewish-Christian-Muslim Relations, Merrimack College, U.S.A. From 2014-2015 he was Visiting Professor in the Department of Studies of Islam in the Contemporary World at the University of Jordan. During the 2013-2014 academic year Meri served as 8th Allianz Visiting Professor of Islamic Studies at the Ludwig Maximilians-University of Munich. From 2011-2014 he was a Visiting Fellow at the Centre of Islamic Studies, Cambridge University. From June 2010-March 2013 he was Fellow of St. Edmund’s College, Cambridge University and served as Academic Director of the Centre for the Study of Muslim-Jewish Relations, Woolf Institute, Cambridge. He has travelled extensively throughout the Middle East and Europe and has lived in Oxford, London, Cambridge, Munich, Amman, Cairo, Damascus and Jerusalem. From 2005-2010 he lived in Amman, where he oversaw a major Qur’anic exegesis project at the Jordanian Royal Court. He previously held visiting appointments at the Institute of Ismaili Studies in London and the University of California at Berkeley. Prof. Meri is a historian of interfaith relations in the Middle East in past and present, a historian of religions, and a specialist in medieval Islamic history and civilisation. Prof. Meri’s research interests include: Muslim-non-Muslim relations in the medieval and modern Middle East, Pilgrimage and the Veneration of Saints and Relics in Islam, Judaism and Christianity; Ritual in Islam and Judaism; Popular Religion; History of the Jews of Arab Lands. His teaching interests include: Ritual in Islam and Judaism; Pilgrimage in Islam and Judaism; Medieval Islamic History and Civilisation; Travel, Hajj and Ziyara; History of Sacred Places in the Middle East; the Jewish communities of the Islamic World; Bibliographic Methods in the Study of the Abrahamic Religions, Autobiographical Writings of Middle Eastern Jews, Christians and Muslims. Prof. Meri served as Editor of the Routledge Handbook of Muslim-Jewish Relations (2016), a major academic resource for the academic study of Muslim-Jewish Relations. His publications include: (ed.) Jewish-Muslim Relations in Past and Present: A Kaleidoscopic View (Leiden: Brill, 2017), (ed.) Medieval Islamic Civilization: An Encyclopedia, 2 vols. (reissue with updated bibliographies and new preface) (Abingdon, Oxon. and New York: Routledge, 2017), and a new revised translation of Al-Ghazali, The Correct Balance (2019). His forthcoming publications include: Pilgrims and Pilgrimage in Islam (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press) and A History of Interfaith Relations in the Middle East and Mediterranean (Toronto: University of Toronto Press). He previously served as Founding Advisory Board Member (Islamic Studies), Oxford Bibliographies On-line (2008-2010), General Editor of Medieval Islamic Civilization: An Encyclopedia (2002-2005), Series Editor of the Great Tafsirs of the Holy Qur’an series (Fons Vitae Publishers, USA with Royal Aal al-Bayt Institute for Islamic Thought, Amman, Jordan)(2005-2010), Section Editor (Islam) of Wiley-Blackwell’s Religion Compass (2005-2010) and Book Review Editor (Medieval Islamic and Jewish Studies), Speculum, published by the Medieval Academy of America (2007-2012) and Founding Editor of Intertwined Worlds (2010-2013), an e-platform dedicated to the academic study of Muslim-Jewish and Muslim-Jewish-Christian Relations.

MemberPaul Michael Kurtz

My research centres on intellectual and religious culture in Germany from 1770 to 1920, with a focus on the history of the humanities – especially classical, biblical, and orientalist scholarship. While thus far I have concentrated on representations of ancient Judaism and their embeddedness in modern cultural, political, and religious complexes, my latest research investigates the longer history of philology across the human sciences. These inquiries contribute, more broadly, to historiography, history of ideas, history of knowledge, German studies, Jewish studies, and religious studies.   My work appears in premier journals of history, religion, and culture, such as History & TheoryCritical Inquiry, Central European History, and Harvard Theological Review. My first monograph, on the historiography of ancient Israel in the German Empire, was published by Mohr Siebeck in 2018.   Since 2019, I have been a Research Fellow of the Research Foundation–Flanders (FWO) at Ghent University. Before coming to Ghent, I was a Marie Curie Fellow at the University of Cambridge and Queens’ College (2017–19), and, prior, a Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Göttingen (2016–17). In 2016, I obtained my PhD, with highest distinction, from Göttingen, where I was also a Fulbright Scholar. During doctoral studies, I held research fellowships at the University of Chicago, Leibniz Institute of European History (Mainz), Max Weber Centre for Advanced Studies (Erfurt), and Ghent. This followed an MDiv at Princeton Theological Seminary.   In addition to the FWO, I have secured funding from the European Commission (Horizon2020), Fulbright Program, German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), and American Schools of Oriental Research.

MemberWojciech Tworek

I am Assistant Professor in the Taube Department of Jewish Studies at the University of Wrocław. Previously, I was Ray D. Wolfe Postdoctoral Fellow at the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Toronto, and a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Wrocław. My book Eternity Now (SUNY 2019) explores the teachings of Shneur Zalman of Liady, the founding rebbe of Chabad. My current research project, funded by the National Science Centre in Poland, concerns Hasidism in interwar Poland.  From 2013 to 2018, I served as the workflow coordinator and Yiddish translator for the Ringelblum Archive Translation Project carried out under the auspices of the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw. Since 2019, I have been involved in the collaborative project entitled A Canon of Memoir Literature by Polish Jews (University of Wrocław).

MemberMarc Bregman

Marc Bregman Brief Biography January 2018     Marc Bregman received his Ph.D. from The Hebrew University in Jerusalem in 1991. He taught at the Hebrew Union College (Jerusalem), The Hebrew University in Jerusalem, the Schechter Institute for Judaic Studies in Jerusalem, and at the Ben-Gurion University in Beer Sheba, Israel. During 1993 he was Visiting Associate Professor at Yale University, and during 1996 he was the Stroum Professor of Jewish Studies and Visiting Research Fellow at the University of Washington in Seattle. During 2005, Bregman served as the Harry Starr Fellow in Judaica at Harvard University and was awarded a Teaching Fellowship at the Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. He also has served as Forchheimer Visiting Professor in the Faculty of Humanities at The Hebrew University in Jerusalem. His book in Hebrew, The Tanhuma-Yelammedenu Literature: Studies in the Evolution of the Versions (Gorgias Press, 2003), has been hailed as “undoubtedly the best research ever done about the most complicated issue in the study of rabbinic literature”. In 2006, Bregman was appointed the Herman and Zelda Bernard Distinguished Professor of Jewish Studies at the University of North Carolina in Greensboro, where he also headed the program in Jewish Studies, until 2013. Bregman retired from UNCG as of July 31, 2017. He has now returned to Jerusalem where he is continuing his research and teaching activities. He may be contacted by email at marc.bregman@gmail.com.