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MemberAlexander Gil

Alex Gil is Digital Scholarship Librarian at Columbia University Libraries. He collaborates with faculty, students and library professionals leveraging computational and network technologies in humanities research, pedagogy and scholarly communications. He curates the Studio@Butler at Columbia University, a tech-light library innovation space focused on digital scholarship and pedagogy; he is founder and faculty moderator of Columbia’s Group for Experimental Methods in the Humanities, a vibrant trans-disciplinary research cluster focused on experimental humanities; senior editor of sx archipelagos, a journal of Caribbean Digital Studies, and co-wrangler of The Caribbean Digital conference series. Current projects include Ed, a digital platform for minimal editions of literary texts; Aimé Césaire and The Broken Record, a minimal computing experiment in long-form digital scholarship; and, In The Same Boats, a visualization of trans-Atlantic intersections of black intellectuals in the 20th century.

MemberMichael Palmese

Michael Palmese earned his PhD in musicology at Louisiana State University with a minor in comparative literature. His primary research interests encompass music and art from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, particularly minimalism and postminimalism. In addition, Michael is interested in Samuel Beckett, politics and music, modernism, Arnold Schoenberg, and aesthetics of the Viennese fin de siècle.

MemberAndrew Granade

Andrew Granade is Professor of Musicology and Associate Dean of Graduate Studies at the University of Missouri – Kansas City Conservatory of Music and Dance. His research focuses on the American Experimental Tradition, particularly the composer and instrument builder Harry Partch, and he is the author of Harry Partch, Hobo Composer. He also has an active interest in music history pedagogy, the relationship of music and media, and musical minimalism.

MemberMarie Emmanuel Queblatin

A 2nd year college student majoring in Developmental Studies. I am currently working on a “mini-thesis,” and using this platform as a means of broadening my knowledge in my area of focus and to other studies as well. Hopefully, as time passes, I may be able to share my researches/thesis and in the very future, the scholarly articles I may write as a professional.

MemberVirginia Anderson

…68 and the Experimental Revolution in Britain’. In Music and Protest in 1968, ed. Beate Kutschke and Barley Norton. Cambridge: CUP, 2013 (978-1-1070-0732-1), pp. 171– 187.

‘Systems and other minimalism in Britain’. In Ashgate Companion to Minimalist and Postminimalist Music, ed. Pwyll ap Siôn and Keith Potter. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate Publishing, 2013 (978-1-4094-3549-5), pp. 87–106….

Virginia Anderson specialises in the study of experimental, minimalist, and free improvisatory music. Her work is published in journals such as The Journal of Musicological Research, Performance Research, New Sounds, and the Galpin Society Journal. She has written chapters in academic anthologies published by Cambridge University Press, Ashgate, University of Michigan Press, and the University of Leuven Press (two titles in this last). She has taught music history, popular music, and ethnomusicology at universities in the UK and in Britain. She is the editor of the Journal of Experimental Music Studies, runs the Experimental Music Catalogue with its founder, Christopher Hobbs, and maintains its web blog and other pages. She is currently editing a book of interviews conducted by Barney Childs with American composers in 1972, to be published by the University of Illinois Press. She also plays clarinet, and has recorded on Zanja, Advance, and Rastascan Recordings, specialising in new works for Eb clarinet and free improvisation. She is currently a member of the free improvisation group CHA, with Bruce Coates (saxes) and Christopher Hobbs (keyboards, electronics, percussion) and the South Leicestershire Improvisors’ Ensemble.

MemberAndrew Colin Gow

In my first book, I traced and analyzed the German legend of the Red Jews, an imaginary conflation of the Ten Tribes of Israel with Gog and Magog, the apocalyptic destroyers featured in the books of Ezekiel and Revelation. My publications since 2000 on the ‘Protestant paradigm’ regarding vernacular Bible translations and editions in the later Middle Ages contributed to a new field of research and debate, with a research cluster at the University of Groningen and a number of conferences and conference panels devoted to the topic. This project addressed late medieval vernacular Bibles, their readership, their dissemination and their cultural effects — which includes contributing to the conditions under which the Protestant Reformation ‘caught fire’ so quickly: e.g., Luther’s Bible translation was a hit because burghers had been reading vernacular Bibles and biblical texts for so long, not because they had been denied access to the Bible. The wide distribution and availability of German and other vernacular Bible translations in the late fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, with 22 printed full Bible translations into German/Low German/Netherlandish appearing before Luther’s famous Bible translation, has been known to scholars since at least the early eighteenth century, when various works on German Bibles before the Reformation began to appear. However, the existence of such translations did not guarantee that scholars, especially church historians and historians of the Reformation took such Bible translations seriously. My findings also demonstrate how central modes of history-writing participate in myth-making — sometimes even under the guise of source analysis. In 2003, my former student Dr. Lara Apps and I co-published Male Witches in Early Modern Europe (Manchester UP), which was based in part on her M.A. thesis. Since 2005, my former student Dr. Robert Desjardins (Ph.D. 2008) and I, along with François Pageau and a number of other graduate students, have been working on the witch trials at Arras in 1459-60 — possibly the very first mass witch-trials that took the classic form under which we know them, a snowball phenomenon driven by torture and sponsored by the authorities — after coming across a hitherto unknown manuscript of a treatise written to justify the trials in their gruesome aftermath. This princely manuscript had been lurking in the UofA library system’s Bruce Peel Special Collections since it was donated to the university by Dr. John Lunn in 1989, but its existence was unknown to scholarship — a 1999 edition of the text relied on manuscripts held at Paris, Brussels and Oxford, but the UofA manuscript is probably the oldest and the best of them. This text anticipates the much better known Witches’ Hammer (Malleus Maleficarum) by a quarter century, and already contains all the elements that the later text would so famously disseminate. Our critical edition of the UofA ms., collated against the other known manuscripts and the 1475 incunabulum printed by Colard Mansion, is in preparation. Our translation of the text, the first into English, and of another treatise written at the same time and in the same place, in collaboration with my Ph.D. student François Pageau and my former student Dr. Robert Desjardins, appeared with Penn State University Press in 2016: http://www.psupress.org/books/titles/978-0-271-07128-2.html. The Bruce Peel Special Collections Library and Archives produced and hosts a digital exhibition on this manuscript: https://omeka.library.ualberta.ca/exhibits/show/tinctor/imagining. We have finished and hope to publish in 2019 with the collaboration of Dr. Jessica Roussanov our complete translation of the voluminous Middle French records of the appeal of the Arras convictions to the Parlement (royal court) of Paris spanning the years 1461 to 1467, with brief postludes up to the final resolution of the appeals in 1491, together with translations of the many late-medieval chronicle entries and other sources relating to these trials from the dawn of the European witch-craze. Demonology and witch-hunting: for more about my recent research, please see this one-minute presentation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_dezXYIMew  

MemberAlbert N. Mitchell II

Mr. Mitchell is one of the country’s most successful inner-city youth program architects. His accomplishments include designing 28 youth programs for the New Jersey State Health Department, the Camden County Prosecutor Office, the Camden Board of Education, the Camden City Police Department, the Camden City Recreation Department, and the Camden Housing Authority. He attended the University of Rutgers, New Jersey and has appeared frequently on local television shows. Mr. Mitchell is also known nationally for his skills as a market research analyst. His former clients include: the United States Mini-soccer Federation (USMF), the Soccer Association for Youth (SAY), R&R Associates (publishers), and the United States Soccer Federation (USSF). In the first six months of operating NJ MED, Mr. Mitchell successfully directed the agency’s first grant award, “The New Jersey Minority Males Community Challenge Grant,” awarded by the New Jersey Department of Human Services. He shares a strength-based and community-focused philosophy of understanding the non-profit sector. To date, he has led NJ MED in developing partnerships with 42 other non-profit organizations in the Camden County area in providing direct services for over 2,500 youths and their families in the City of Camden, New Jersey.

MemberAbbey Elder

I am the Open Access & Scholarly Communication Librarian for Iowa State University. I teach our university’s Information Literacy course, Library 160, and provide liaison support for the Anthropology and Sociology departments at the university. However, the bulk of my duties relate to outreach and education about Open Access, Open Education, copyright, and other topics related to Scholarly Communication. My main job duties at this time are related to Open Education and Open Educational Resources (OER). I have created guides and tools for users to learn more about OER, including a recent series of Youtube videos to introduce faculty to OER and topics related to Open Education. I have also coordinated our Open Education Mini-Grants on campus, and participate on Iowa State’s Open & Affordable Education Committee. My personal and professional interests lie in Open Education, Open Science, and the Digital Humanities: I am interested in the ways that the Digital Humanities are changing the traditional flow of scholarship among scholars in Humanities disciplines, and I am also interested in Open Access monograph publishing and Open Textbook publishing. If you have a research project you are seeking collaborators for, feel free to reach out and I will let you know if I’m interested.