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MemberMichail Kitsos

My research examines the process of identity formation and the ongoing crossing of religious and social boundaries between Jews and Christians in late antiquity and the Middle Byzantine period in the Mediterranean world. Focusing on an array of Christian anti-Jewish multivocal texts, among which are the Adversus or Contra Iudaeos dialogues, and rabbinic multivocal narratives between rabbis and “others,” I analyze the construction and impersonation of the “other” by both Christian and Jewish authors to create an effective rhetorical space in which they re-imagined themselves in relation to the “other.” My research interests also include the study of bigotry, violence, hate speech, and gendered language to investigate the interplay between divisive language and social construction and structure. For more information on my research focus, current and future work, see my personal website (michailkitsos.org).

MemberJosef Meri

Born in the United States Prof. Meri hails from a Jerusalemite family. Meri is presently a faculty member of the College of Islamic Studies, Hamad Bin Khalifa University in Doha, Qatar. He is also Faculty Associate (non-resident) at the Center for the Study of Jewish-Christian-Muslim Relations, Merrimack College, U.S.A. From 2014-2015 he was Visiting Professor in the Department of Studies of Islam in the Contemporary World at the University of Jordan. During the 2013-2014 academic year Meri served as 8th Allianz Visiting Professor of Islamic Studies at the Ludwig Maximilians-University of Munich. From 2011-2014 he was a Visiting Fellow at the Centre of Islamic Studies, Cambridge University. From June 2010-March 2013 he was Fellow of St. Edmund’s College, Cambridge University and served as Academic Director of the Centre for the Study of Muslim-Jewish Relations, Woolf Institute, Cambridge. He has travelled extensively throughout the Middle East and Europe and has lived in Oxford, London, Cambridge, Munich, Amman, Cairo, Damascus and Jerusalem. From 2005-2010 he lived in Amman, where he oversaw a major Qur’anic exegesis project at the Jordanian Royal Court. He previously held visiting appointments at the Institute of Ismaili Studies in London and the University of California at Berkeley. Prof. Meri is a historian of interfaith relations in the Middle East in past and present, a historian of religions, and a specialist in medieval Islamic history and civilisation. Prof. Meri’s research interests include: Muslim-non-Muslim relations in the medieval and modern Middle East, Pilgrimage and the Veneration of Saints and Relics in Islam, Judaism and Christianity; Ritual in Islam and Judaism; Popular Religion; History of the Jews of Arab Lands. His teaching interests include: Ritual in Islam and Judaism; Pilgrimage in Islam and Judaism; Medieval Islamic History and Civilisation; Travel, Hajj and Ziyara; History of Sacred Places in the Middle East; the Jewish communities of the Islamic World; Bibliographic Methods in the Study of the Abrahamic Religions, Autobiographical Writings of Middle Eastern Jews, Christians and Muslims. Prof. Meri served as Editor of the Routledge Handbook of Muslim-Jewish Relations (2016), a major academic resource for the academic study of Muslim-Jewish Relations. His publications include: (ed.) Jewish-Muslim Relations in Past and Present: A Kaleidoscopic View (Leiden: Brill, 2017), (ed.) Medieval Islamic Civilization: An Encyclopedia, 2 vols. (reissue with updated bibliographies and new preface) (Abingdon, Oxon. and New York: Routledge, 2017), and a new revised translation of Al-Ghazali, The Correct Balance (2019). His forthcoming publications include: Pilgrims and Pilgrimage in Islam (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press) and A History of Interfaith Relations in the Middle East and Mediterranean (Toronto: University of Toronto Press). He previously served as Founding Advisory Board Member (Islamic Studies), Oxford Bibliographies On-line (2008-2010), General Editor of Medieval Islamic Civilization: An Encyclopedia (2002-2005), Series Editor of the Great Tafsirs of the Holy Qur’an series (Fons Vitae Publishers, USA with Royal Aal al-Bayt Institute for Islamic Thought, Amman, Jordan)(2005-2010), Section Editor (Islam) of Wiley-Blackwell’s Religion Compass (2005-2010) and Book Review Editor (Medieval Islamic and Jewish Studies), Speculum, published by the Medieval Academy of America (2007-2012) and Founding Editor of Intertwined Worlds (2010-2013), an e-platform dedicated to the academic study of Muslim-Jewish and Muslim-Jewish-Christian Relations.

MemberSihong Lin

I am a historian of cross-cultural exchanges in late antiquity and the early Middle Ages. My research reinterprets the history of the seventh-century papacy through the perspective of its networks. Although this period is frequently seen as when the unity of Christendom fractured, by considering together admirers of Rome from both the post-Roman West and the Eastern Roman Empire, I argue that we can trace how echoes of Greek disputes were passed westwards by these transnational pro-papal networks. My publications therefore focus on the influence of eastern ideas on Latin authors, particularly Gregory of Tours and the Venerable Bede, and argue for a more interconnected Christendom at the end of late antiquity.

MemberJoshua Reno

Joshua Reno is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Classical & Near Eastern Studies, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN. He holds an MTh in New Testament from Luther Seminary (St. Paul, MN). His research interests include the Pauline epistles, Hellenistic/Roman philosophy, ancient invective, and the Second Sophistic. He is writing his dissertation on the use of sexual invective in the Pauline corpus as part of his community-shaping strategy. Specifically, Joshua’s interest lies in how Paul deploys insinuations of gender-sexual deviancy/deficiency against his rivals as part of his rhetorical effort to exert control over these nascent Christian communities and how this reconsideration impacts reconstructive mirror-readings.

MemberJennifer Marion Taylor

https://hcommons.org/members/jennytaylor/ I am a journalist, an independent academic, a Bloomsbury author and a campaigner who pioneered religious literacy in journalism in Britain, founding Lapido Media in 2005 and running it until 2016.  A registered charity an online newspaper and publishing house, it helped to change the national secular discourse by providing resources for journalists needing to ‘get religion’ in an age of globalization, and contributing to several government-level reports. I am particularly interested in how we as journalists, for whom no formal philosophical or moral training is required, do ‘truth’ in a globalized context without overt ethical moorings, at least in UK. As a member of the KLICE Group and one who has travelled widely, particularly in the Muslim world, I enjoy every bit of the question that anchors us: What time is it in our culture?