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Memberbrandonwhawk

…Ph.D., Medieval Studies, University of Connecticut, 2014.

M.A., Medieval Studies, University of Connecticut, 2009.

B.A., English, Houghton College, 2007….

I am Assistant Professor in the English Department at Rhode Island College. I received my B.A. in English from Houghton College in 2007, my M.A. in Medieval Studies from the University of Connecticut in 2009, and my Ph.D. in Medieval Studies from the University of Connecticut in 2014. My fields of expertise are Old and Middle English, history of the English language, digital humanities, the Bible as/in literature, translation, and the history of the book. Most of my interests in research and teaching encompass what might be called transmission studies: the afterlives of texts, including circulation, translations, adaptations, and re-presentations in various cultures and media.

MemberMaeve Doyle

…4/teaching-violence-destruction-and-propaganda-at-nimrud-in-antiquity-and-today/

“The Portrait Potential: Gender, Identity, and Devotion in Manuscript Owner Portraits, 1230-1320” (PhD diss., Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, PA, 2015)

“Prayer, Seduction, and Agency in a Thirteenth-Century Psalter,” Essays in Medieval Studies 30 (2014): 37-54…

Maeve Doyle is Assistant Professor of Art History in the Art & Art History Department at Eastern Connecticut State University. Her research addresses the visual and material culture of late medieval Europe, with a special focus on the arts of the book, gender and the body, and reception aesthetics. Dr. Doyle earned her PhD from Bryn Mawr College with a dissertation entitled, “The Portrait Potential: Gender, Identity, and Devotion in Manuscript Owner Portraits, 1230–1320.” She has received grants from the Fulbright Commission and the Mrs. Giles Whiting Foundation. She has presented her research at the International Congress on Medieval Studies at Kalamazoo, the International Medieval Congress at Leeds, and the Feminist Art History Conference, among others. Her work has appeared in the edited volume Pleasure in the Middle Ages and in Essays in Medieval Studies.