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MemberAbigail Young

After finishing a Licentiate and PhD in mediaeval studies (specifically the history of mediaeval scritural exegesis), I found myself in non-traditional academic employment as a research associate at the Records of Early English Drama at the University of Toronto. There I honed my Latin and palaeographic skills, developed copy-editing skills, and learned to code C and HTML. But I found little time to give to the history of theology or exegesis, even to my chief interest, the Fourth Gospel. Now, in retirement, I am pursuing a long-desired goal of writing a commentary on that Gospel. It’s both a learning and a teaching experience.

MemberYvonne Seale

I am an Assistant Professor in the History Department of the State University of New York-Geneseo, where I teach courses with a focus on medieval history, women’s history, and the digital humanities. I earned my BA in History, Ancient History and Archaeology from Trinity College Dublin, and my MLitt in Mediaeval History from the University of St Andrews. I obtained my PhD in History from The University of Iowa in 2016. Follow me on Twitter at @yvonneseale or email me at seale@geneseo.edu.

MemberSimone Pinet

I work at the intersection of discourses in medieval Iberian literatures, that is, I like asking questions that come up when one sees an apparently unrelated or distant sphere intervening in the literary, whether it be politics, or cartography, or economics, which is what I am currently working on for a book project. As an extension of this, I am interested in how the medieval intervenes in other periods, other geographies, that is, how the medieval informs (or disinforms) discourses about modernity or secularism or civilization, and how it shapes imperial and colonial projects, or contemporary Latin American literatures.

MemberEmma Herbert-Davies

I am currently completing an MA in Medieval Studies at the University of Leeds. My undergraduate dissertation explored how horses were used in manuscript art to reflect the status and gender of their riders. My master’s dissertation carries on the equine theme through a study of violence and injury to horses in medieval tournaments. I will begin my PhD in September and my thesis will be based on researching the equestrian equipment used in tournaments and warfare, with a focus on horse armour. My supervisors will be Dr Alan Murray (University of Leeds) and Dr Karen Watts (Royal Armouries, Leeds). I have ridden, trained and competed horses for most of my life and also have a keen interest in numismatics, having spent much of my undergraduate time cataloging and digitising the University of Leeds coin collections (@winchestercoins).  

MemberJacob Currie

I am a medievalist, Latinist, and legal historian. I grew up in Toronto and studied classical and medieval languages there before moving to Trinity College, Cambridge for a master’s and doctorate in medieval legal history. After leaving Cambridge, I worked at Oxford, largely on English medieval manuscript provenance. Since then I have been a research fellow at the Institut de recherche et d’histoire des textes, Paris (part of the CNRS).

MemberAnna Hegland

I am a VCRS-funded doctoral student in the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies at the University of Kent (Canterbury campus), where my research centers on the language of violence in early modern revenge drama, and the intersections of rhetoric, materiality, and performance. My MA dissertation at the University of Birmingham’s Shakespeare Institute explored the linguistic philosophy of Shakespeare’s curses. Further research interests include weaponized words and disease in early modern drama. I am also a member of Cultures of Performance in Medieval and Early Modern Europe, a research cluster at Kent dedicated to investigating performance events in Europe from c. 500 – 1700, and organize the postgraduate-led Coffee House seminars, an interdisciplinary series of workshops and discussions for early modernists at Kent.