Search

MemberJosef Meri

Born in the United States Prof. Meri hails from a Jerusalemite family. Meri is presently a faculty member of the College of Islamic Studies, Hamad Bin Khalifa University in Doha, Qatar. He is also Faculty Associate (non-resident) at the Center for the Study of Jewish-Christian-Muslim Relations, Merrimack College, U.S.A. From 2014-2015 he was Visiting Professor in the Department of Studies of Islam in the Contemporary World at the University of Jordan. During the 2013-2014 academic year Meri served as 8th Allianz Visiting Professor of Islamic Studies at the Ludwig Maximilians-University of Munich. From 2011-2014 he was a Visiting Fellow at the Centre of Islamic Studies, Cambridge University. From June 2010-March 2013 he was Fellow of St. Edmund’s College, Cambridge University and served as Academic Director of the Centre for the Study of Muslim-Jewish Relations, Woolf Institute, Cambridge. He has travelled extensively throughout the Middle East and Europe and has lived in Oxford, London, Cambridge, Munich, Amman, Cairo, Damascus and Jerusalem. From 2005-2010 he lived in Amman, where he oversaw a major Qur’anic exegesis project at the Jordanian Royal Court. He previously held visiting appointments at the Institute of Ismaili Studies in London and the University of California at Berkeley. Prof. Meri is a historian of interfaith relations in the Middle East in past and present, a historian of religions, and a specialist in medieval Islamic history and civilisation. Prof. Meri’s research interests include: Muslim-non-Muslim relations in the medieval and modern Middle East, Pilgrimage and the Veneration of Saints and Relics in Islam, Judaism and Christianity; Ritual in Islam and Judaism; Popular Religion; History of the Jews of Arab Lands. His teaching interests include: Ritual in Islam and Judaism; Pilgrimage in Islam and Judaism; Medieval Islamic History and Civilisation; Travel, Hajj and Ziyara; History of Sacred Places in the Middle East; the Jewish communities of the Islamic World; Bibliographic Methods in the Study of the Abrahamic Religions, Autobiographical Writings of Middle Eastern Jews, Christians and Muslims. Prof. Meri served as Editor of the Routledge Handbook of Muslim-Jewish Relations (2016), a major academic resource for the academic study of Muslim-Jewish Relations. His publications include: (ed.) Jewish-Muslim Relations in Past and Present: A Kaleidoscopic View (Leiden: Brill, 2017), (ed.) Medieval Islamic Civilization: An Encyclopedia, 2 vols. (reissue with updated bibliographies and new preface) (Abingdon, Oxon. and New York: Routledge, 2017), and a new revised translation of Al-Ghazali, The Correct Balance (2019). His forthcoming publications include: Pilgrims and Pilgrimage in Islam (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press) and A History of Interfaith Relations in the Middle East and Mediterranean (Toronto: University of Toronto Press). He previously served as Founding Advisory Board Member (Islamic Studies), Oxford Bibliographies On-line (2008-2010), General Editor of Medieval Islamic Civilization: An Encyclopedia (2002-2005), Series Editor of the Great Tafsirs of the Holy Qur’an series (Fons Vitae Publishers, USA with Royal Aal al-Bayt Institute for Islamic Thought, Amman, Jordan)(2005-2010), Section Editor (Islam) of Wiley-Blackwell’s Religion Compass (2005-2010) and Book Review Editor (Medieval Islamic and Jewish Studies), Speculum, published by the Medieval Academy of America (2007-2012) and Founding Editor of Intertwined Worlds (2010-2013), an e-platform dedicated to the academic study of Muslim-Jewish and Muslim-Jewish-Christian Relations.

MemberAdrienne Williams Boyarin

Adrienne Williams Boyarin (PhD UC Berkeley, 2006) is Associate Professor of English and English Graduate Program Advisor at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada. She is author of Miracles of the Virgin in Medieval England: Law and Jewishness in Marian Legends (D.S. Brewer 2010), praised as “elegantly written, scrupulously researched,” and a model of “codicological expertise” (Speculum 88.1, 2013). She is editor and translator of the alliterative Siege of Jerusalem (Broadview 2013, rev. in TLS) and Miracles of the Virgin in Middle English (Broadview 2015, rev. in TMR), and the founding Executive Editor of the journal Early Middle English (Arc Humanities/Amsterdam UP). Her research interests include Jewish-Christian polemics, medieval Anglo-Jewish history, Early Middle English (and the multilingual Early Middle English period broadly), manuscript studies, Marian texts, and gender studies. She is a former member of the MLA Executive Committee for TC Religion and Literature (2014-2019) and the MLA Delegate Assembly (2017-2019).  

MemberYael Landman

Hebrew Bible; ancient Near East; biblical, cuneiform, and early Jewish law; law and literature; Semitic linguistics My work examines the Hebrew Bible in comparison with ancient Near Eastern sources and draws on contemporary legal and literary theory and linguistics, with further recourse to ancient Jewish sources and medieval exegesis. I am currently transforming my dissertation into a book entitled Legal Practice, Legal Writing: The Biblical Bailment Law and Divine Justice.  I am Acquisitions Editor of Hebrew Bible, Ancient Near East, and Jewish Studies at Gorgias Press. If you are interested in submitting a proposal, email me at yael@gorgiaspress.com. I am currently Visiting Research Fellow in Judaic Studies at CUNY Brooklyn College.

MemberMichael Miller

I’m a researcher and teacher, in the broad area of philosophy and religion. Slightly narrower, my specialism is Judaism, and narrower still I focus on Jewish mysticism and modern Jewish philosophy (usually of the more ‘secular’ flavour: Benjamin, Rosenzweig, Levinas, et al). However I’m stubbornly interdisciplinary and usually try to cross the boundaries between different aspects of philosophy and speculative thought as well as trying to keep up with current research in scientific, linguistic and psychological fields which connect with my interests. Keeping it broad helps to revitalise intellectual disciplines and keep them exciting. The other area I’m increasingly focusing on in my research and teaching is Black Judaism, especially the Hebrew Israelite movement. I’m also very interested in experimenting with the forms of research, writing and teaching – making these practices more accessible, more artistic, more willing to think outside the usual boxes.

MemberMarc Bregman

Marc Bregman Brief Biography January 2018     Marc Bregman received his Ph.D. from The Hebrew University in Jerusalem in 1991. He taught at the Hebrew Union College (Jerusalem), The Hebrew University in Jerusalem, the Schechter Institute for Judaic Studies in Jerusalem, and at the Ben-Gurion University in Beer Sheba, Israel. During 1993 he was Visiting Associate Professor at Yale University, and during 1996 he was the Stroum Professor of Jewish Studies and Visiting Research Fellow at the University of Washington in Seattle. During 2005, Bregman served as the Harry Starr Fellow in Judaica at Harvard University and was awarded a Teaching Fellowship at the Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. He also has served as Forchheimer Visiting Professor in the Faculty of Humanities at The Hebrew University in Jerusalem. His book in Hebrew, The Tanhuma-Yelammedenu Literature: Studies in the Evolution of the Versions (Gorgias Press, 2003), has been hailed as “undoubtedly the best research ever done about the most complicated issue in the study of rabbinic literature”. In 2006, Bregman was appointed the Herman and Zelda Bernard Distinguished Professor of Jewish Studies at the University of North Carolina in Greensboro, where he also headed the program in Jewish Studies, until 2013. Bregman retired from UNCG as of July 31, 2017. He has now returned to Jerusalem where he is continuing his research and teaching activities. He may be contacted by email at marc.bregman@gmail.com.