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MemberDennis Looney

Since 2014, I have served as director of the Office of Programs and director of the Association of Departments of Foreign Languages at MLA. For the Office of Programs I oversee projects relating to the profession, such as departmental reviews, the ongoing examination of faculty rights and responsibilities, monitoring educational and curricular changes, and the development of statements of best practices. As director of ADFL, I oversee the Language Consultancy Service, the MLA Language Map, the language enrollment database, survey, and report, and other projects focused on languages other than English. From 1986 to 2013, I taught Italian at the University of Pittsburgh, with secondary appointments in classics and philosophy. I was chair of the Department of French and Italian for eleven years and assistant dean of the humanities for three years at Pitt. Publications include Compromising the Classics: Romance Epic Narrative in the Italian Renaissance (1996), which received honorable mention in the 1996–97 joint Howard R. Marraro Prize and Scaglione Award in Italian Studies from the MLA, and Freedom Readers: The African American Reception of Dante Alighieri and the Divine Comedy (2011), which received the American Association of Italian Studies Book Prize (general category) in 2011. With D. Mark Possanza, I am co-editor and translator of Ludovico Ariosto’s Latin Poetry, I Tatti Renaissance Library, Harvard University Press (2018). Some key research interests: Renaissance Studies; comparative literature; reception of the classical tradition; vernacular classicism; history of the book; Italian; Latin; Greek; Medievalisms; Dante; Divine Comedy; Matteo Maria Boiardo; Ludovico Ariosto; Torquato Tasso; romance/epic; Neo-Latin poetry; Herodotus.  

MemberSimone Bregni, Ph.D.

I am an associate professor of Italian language, literature and culture with twenty-four years of teaching & leadership experience at the university level. My areas of specialization are Medieval & Renaissance Italian literature and foreign (F/L2) language acquisition. Currently, my focus is on the applications of technology and digital media to language acquisition, in particular video game-based learning (VGBL). In fall 2016, as a recipient of the Saint Louis University (SLU) Reinert Center for Innovative Teaching, I developed Intensive Italian for Gamers. The course was successfully taught in the SLU state-of-the-art Learning Studio in spring 2017. I have presented my research and results in workshops and presentations, at conferences and in publications (in print and forthcoming). I have an extensive and eclectic background in Classics (Greek and Latin, Philology, Literature), Ancient and Medieval History, Theology, Philosophy; but also in Cinema Studies, International Studies, Communications and Journalism. I definitely enjoyed the variety of my studies. I am a firm believer in multidisciplinary approaches to both learning and teaching.

MemberDavid Geoffrey Lummus

David Lummus is the assistant director of the Center for Italian Studies at the University of Notre Dame. He was previously on the faculty at Yale University and then at Stanford University, where he taught medieval and early modern Italian literature and culture. His publications on Boccaccio, Petrarch, and the Italian fourteenth century have appeared in journals such as Mediaevalia, Speculum, and Renaissance Quarterly as well as in books such as the Cambridge Companion to Boccaccio (2015) and Boccaccio: A Critical Guide to the Complete Works (2013). With Martin Eisner, he is co-editor of A Boccaccian Renaissance: Essays on the Early Modern Impact of Giovanni Boccaccio and His Works (University of Notre Dame Press, 2019). He has recently completed a monograph on conceptions of the civic role of the poet in fourteenth-century Italy, and he is the editor of the American Boccaccio Association’s Lectura Boccaccii for Day 6 of the Decameron.