Search

MemberChristian Cooijmans

Chris studied medieval history at Utrecht University, Trinity College Dublin, and the University of Edinburgh, and was a recent Postdoctoral Fellow at Edinburgh’s Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities (IASH). His current research at the University of Liverpool explores the reach and repercussions of viking activity across the Frankish realm, as well as its subsequent, premodern historiography.

MemberVictoria Leonard

Victoria Leonard is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, and a Research Fellow at the Centre for Arts, Memory and Communities at Coventry University. She is an Honorary Research Associate in the Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London. She joined the Institute of Classical Studies as a Research Associate in 2017, and became a Research Fellow in 2020. She was a Postdoctoral Researcher as part of the ERC-funded project ‘Connected Clerics. Building a Universal Church in the Late Antique West (380-604 CE)’, at Royal Holloway, University London and the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities (ACDH-ÖAW), Austrian Academy of Sciences (Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften). Her role within the project involved compiling data on clerical connections and using adapted digital tools to examine and visualize evolving clerical networks in the late ancient and early medieval western Mediterranean. Victoria’s research focuses on the late antique and early medieval western Mediterranean, with a special interest in: social network analysis, data collection and digital humanities; ancient and early medieval historiography; ancient religion, particularly Christianity; and gender, sexuality, violence, and theories of the body in antiquity. Victoria has published articles in the journals Vigiliae Christianae, Studies in Late Antiquity, and Gender and History. Her monograph, In Defiance of History: Orosius and the Unimproved Past, is under contract with Routledge. With Laurence Totelin and Mark Bradley, Victoria is editing the volume Bodily Fluids in Antiquity for Routledge. She has written for The Guardian and The Times Higher Education, and she has contributed to BBC Radio 3’s Free Thinking. Victoria is a founding member, former co-chair, and steering committee member of the Women’s Classical Committee (UK). She organises #WCCWiki which seeks to improve the representation of women classicists (broadly conceived) on Wikipedia.

MemberTiago Queimada e Silva

My doctoral dissertation deals with historiographical depictions of the encounter between Christianity and Islam in late medieval Portugal (late thirteenth-fifteenth centuries). Approaching medieval chronicles and genealogies as literary representations and active social practices, I examine how the portrayals of the war against Islam not only served for the political legitimization of royalty and aristocracy, but also provided them with a raison d’être, a social usefulness. I am particularly interested in how culture – in this case, historiography – can be used as an ideological tool to justify, reinforce, reproduce, or transform an existing social order.

MemberVeronika Wieser

I am Postdoc researcher at the Institute for Medieval Research, Austrian Academy of Sciences and lecturer at the University of Vienna. I am a cultural historian of Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages, with an emphasis on interdisciplinary, comparative research. – I was coordinator and project member of the SFB  “Visions of Community. Comparative Approaches to Ethnicity, Region and Empire in Christianity, Islam and Buddhism (400-1600 CE)” from 2011 to 2019, and I am editorial board member of the journal “Medieval Worlds: Comparative and Interdisciplinary Studies”. My research focuses on apocalyptic thought and topics of eschatology, on historiography and ascetic communities in the Late Roman Empire and the early medieval period, with particular interest on issues of religious and ethnic identity, notions of death and salvation, and medical history. I have co-edited two interdisciplinary volumes on apocalypticism and eschatology (Cultures of Eschatology, 2020; Abendländische Apokalyptik. Zur Genealogie der Endzeit, 2013) and I am currently working on a book on eschatology in Late Antiquity.

MemberMarcus Meer

I am a historian of urban communication and visual culture, interested in a comparative perspective on the towns and cities of late medieval Europe, with a special focus on England and the German-speaking lands. I analyse how townspeople used texts, images, objects, architecture, and rituals to represent, construct, and contest individual and collective identities, social hierarchies, and political structures.