Search

MemberMatthew Scarborough

…rmining lexical cognacy for Indo-European cladistic research” In M. Serangeli & T. Olander (eds) Dispersals and diversification: Linguistic and archaeological perspectives on the early stages of Indo-European pp.179-208 (Leiden: Brill).

2017. “Studies in the Linguistic Prehistory of the Boeotian Dialect” Teiresias 47.1 : 14-24.

2015. “A New Edition of IG IX,2 69″ Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik 193 : 166-171.

2014. “On the Phonology and Orthography of the Thessalian Mid-Long Vowels” 11th International Conference on Greek Linguistics (Rhodes, 26-29 September 2013): Selected Papers / Πρακτικά, ed. by G. Kotzoglou, K. Nikolou, E. Karantzola, K. Frantzi, I. Galantomos, M. Georgalidou, V. Kourti-Kazoulis, C. Papadopoulou & E. Vlachou, 1535-48. Rhodes: Department of Mediterranean Studies, University of the Aegean.

Database & Digital Datasets:

Forthcoming. Anderson, Cormac, Paul Heggarty & Matthew Scarborough (eds.) Indo-European Cognate Relationships Database (IE-CoR). Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.

Forthcoming. (with Matilde Serangeli) “Hittite” To appear in Indo-European Cognate Relationships Database (IE-CoR). Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.

Forthcoming. (with Matilde Serangeli) “Luwian” To appear in Indo-European Cognate Relationships Database (IE-CoR). Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.

Forthcoming. “Greek: Mycenaean” To appear in Indo-European Cognate Relationships Database (IE-CoR). Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.

Forthcoming. “Greek: Ancient (Attic)” To appear in Indo-European Cognate Relationships Database (IE-CoR). Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.

Forthcoming. “Greek: New Testament” To appear in Indo-European Cognate Relationships Database (IE-CoR). Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.

Forthcoming. “Greek: Modern Standard” To appear in Indo-European Cognate Relationships Database (IE-CoR). Jena: M…

I was awarded my Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge (UK) in March 2017 for a dissertation on the linguistic prehistory and historical dialectology of the Aeolic dialects of Ancient Greek. Since October 2015 I have been also collaborating as a research associate with the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (Jena, Germany) on a new database of Indo-European cognate relations. Since Fall 2019 I have also been a sessional lecturer in Classics at MacEwan University (Edmonton, Canada). My research interests can be subdivided into a handful of related topics:

  • Greek language and linguistics (from Mycenaean to the modern spoken language)
  • Ancient Greek dialect studies (from both literary and sub-literary sources)
  • Ancient Greek epigraphy and papyrology
  • Indo-European comparative linguistics and philology (including comparative myth and poetics)
  • Homer and other Early Greek poetry
  • Etymology and the Indo-European lexicon
  • Language classification, cladistics, and subgrouping methodologies in historical linguistics

MemberLik Hang Tsui

Lik Hang Tsui holds a bachelor’s degree in History from Peking University and a doctoral degree in Oriental Studies from the University of Oxford. Before joining City University of Hong Kong, he worked as a Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and a Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University with the China Biographical Database (CBDB). He has also held visiting appointments and fellowships at Academia Sinica, Peking University, and the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science. He specializes in middle period Chinese history and culture, as well as the digital humanities. He is currently writing a book on Song dynasty epistolary culture and planning another one on digital humanities in China.

MemberFrancesco Luzzini

My research focuses mainly on natural philosophy, medicine, and the Earth and environmental sciences in early modern Europe, with important forays into modern and contemporary contexts. Currently, I am Affiliate Scholar at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin (Department I), Contributing Editor for the Isis Current Bibliography of the History of Science, Councilor for the journal Earth Sciences History, and Co-editor (History of Science) of the journal Il Protagora. I strongly believe in the Digital Humanities and in the Open Access ideals of accessibility and democratization of knowledge. In my scholarly and outreach activities, I always strive to make my work accessible to a virtually unlimited audience of students, scholars and academics, as well as to the general public.

MemberCeline Camps

Celine Camps is a PhD student in the history of early modern science at Columbia University. Her research interests revolve around early modern artisanal practices and culture. She is especially interested in German artisans’ approaches to nature and the ways in which they produced and communicated knowledge about it. Camps graduated cum laude from Maastricht University with a B.A. in Arts and Culture and holds a Master’s degree (cum laude) in the the History and Philosophy of the Sciences and Humanities from Utrecht University. Before coming to Columbia, she worked at Sven Dupré’s research group Art and Knowledge in Pre-Modern Europe at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin and the Huygens ING (Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences) in The Hague. Since 2016, she is a participant in Professor Pamela Smith’s Making and Knowing Project at Columbia University, as part of which she has helped transcribe and encode an anonymous sixteenth-century French technical-artisanal manuscript. In 2019, she was appointed member to the Renaissance Society of America’s first Graduate Student Advisory Committee. She also serves as rapporteur for the History and Philosophy of Science Seminars at Columbia University.

MemberLeon Chisholm

Leon Chisholm studied applied music and musicology in Canada and the United States, obtaining a PhD in historical musicology from the University of California, Berkeley in 2015. His dissertation research, funded in part by the Cini Foundation in Venice, concerned the mechanization of polyphonic vocal idioms brought about by the rise of lute and keyboard playing in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Italy. He is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Humboldt University Berlin, the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, and of CRC 980, “Epistemes in Motion,” at the Free University Berlin. Previously, he held postdoctoral fellowships at the Deutsches Museum in Munich and the Italian Academy at Columbia University. Leon is currently at work on projects concerning the social construction of timbre in organ building and the material origins of musical style and concepts in early modern Europe. His book project Keyboard Playing and the Reconceptualization of Polyphonic Music in Early Modern Italy investigates how seminal changes in the concept and structure of polyphony were rooted in a shift of praxis defined by the increasing role of keyboard instruments in composition, teaching, theory, performance, and rehearsal. In addition to his academic research, Leon is a practicing musician specializing in organs and historical keyboards. He is also co-editor of the blog for the History of Music Theory group of the American Musicological Society and the Society for Music Theory.