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MemberYevgenya Strakovsky

Research Focus:
The long 19th Century (Romanticism, Realism, High Modernism),
Education and the Individual (The Bildungsroman, autonomy, agency, citizenship, personality, character development)Methodological Interests/Interdisciplinary Ties:
Translation Studies,
History of Visual Arts,
History of Music,
Cognitive Approaches to Literature,
Graphic Design and VisualizationProfessional Concerns:
Humanities in Higher Education,
Public Outreach,
Arts Administration

MemberMegan Vallowe

My research takes an intersectional approach to Indigenous Literature of the Western Hemisphere, while my teaching more broadly emphasizes race and gender across literary periods and locales. My book project, “Indigenous Women’s Resistance in 19th Century Popular Media,” examines the biopolitics of Indigenous women’s manipulation of settler-colonial rhetorics in the long 19th century. When teaching, I encourage students to find their own voices through intersectional discussions of texts that demonstrate the rich diversity of American literature. My courses rely on discussion-based pedagogy that allows students to discover their voices, critically engage with texts, and take ownership of their education.

MemberTekla Babyak

Tekla Babyak received her PhD in musicology from Cornell University in 2014, supported by a Mellon Fellowship in Humanistic Studies and a Jacob K. Javits Fellowship. She is currently an independent musicologist based in Davis, CA. She has chosen not to pursue academic employment because of her potentially disabling health condition, multiple sclerosis. She is an advocate for the inclusion of independent and disabled scholars in academic venues such as conferences. Her research focuses on intersections between music, temporality, and philosophy during the long 19th century. Recent articles include “Tropes of Transcendence: Representing and Overcoming Time in Nineteenth-Century Music” (Journal of the Royal Musical Association, Fall 2017) and “Dante, Liszt, and the Alienated Agony of Hell” (Bibliotheca Dantesca). Forthcoming publications include “The Rubble of the Other: Beethoven’s Ruins of Athens” in a Routledge volume of essays. She is a member of the American Musicological Society council for the 2018-2021 term.

MemberWladimir Fischer-Nebmaier

Dr. Wladimir Fischer-Nebmaier is Senior Researcher at the Institute for Habsburg and Balkan Studies (IHB) at the Austrian Academy of Sciences. He studied Southslav Literatures and Languages, and History at the University of Vienna, Austria. Wladimir has carried out research on communication and  self/representations of the Balkan ruling classes, Socialist literary politics, Balkan popular cultures, Balkan nationalisms, stereotypes, language and social identity, and the socio-cultural impact of migration in Central Europe and North America. He teaches History at Vienna University. He is currently working on (digitally) editing the protocols of the Austrian government 1914-1918 and on a book on media and mobility in/between Austro-Hungarian and American Cities in the long 19th century.

MemberChristine Yao

Christine “Xine” Yao is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of British Columbia in the Department of English. She works on intersections of affect, race, gender, and sexuality in relation to science and law through long 19th century American literature. Her research has been published in J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists and American Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion. She is an award-winning instructor of literature, culture, and writing. She completed her Ph.D.  in English at Cornell University in 2016 with minors in American Studies and Feminism, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Dr. Yao’s postdoctoral, PhD, and MA work has been funded by competitive national grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Her archival research has been supported by travel grants to the American Antiquarian Society, the Massachusetts Historical Society, and the College of the Library of Physicians of Philadelphia. Additional training thanks to the Center for American Visual Culture, the Futures of American Studies Institute at Dartmouth College, and the LGBT Leadership Academy at Cornell in Washington. For further information and CV, please see http://www.christineyao.com 

MemberSamuel Zerin

Samuel Zerin is a musicologist, music theorist, composer, and pianist.  He is a chief editor of the International Journal of the Study of Music and Musical Performance (forthcoming) and has held teaching positions at New York University and Brown University.

His PhD dissertation, for defense in April 2018 at New York University, is the first critical biography of the Russian-Jewish violinist and composer Joseph Achron (1886-1943) and a theoretical investigation of late Romantic paradigms surrounding child prodigies and performer-composers. His research on music of the long 19th century focuses primarily on virtuosity, transcription, and supernatural creatures.  He is a specialist in early 20th century Jewish musical nationalism, and has broader analytical interests in 21st century Yiddish pop songs and Disney music.

In 2010, he founded the Joseph Achron Society, working together with musicians and scholars from over a dozen countries to revive the forgotten legacy of this brilliant musician.  In this role, he has been editing and publishing first editions of Achron’s manuscript works, in addition to networking musicians and fundraising.  He has also worked as a music archivist, creating an online archive of rare Jewish classical scores at the website of the American Society for Jewish Music and processing, sorting, and cataloguing thousands of manuscripts, published scores, and other archival music documents at the New York campus of Hebrew Union College.

Zerin is also an amateur polyglot, with particularly strong interests in Yiddish, Russian, and the Scandinavian languages.

MemberIris Agmon

I completed my Ph.D. at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 1995 and won a post-doc fellowship at the (then) newly-established department of Middle East Studies, Ben Gurion University of the Negev. In 1997 I joined the department as a faculty member. My fields of research and teaching include socio-legal history of the Ottoman Empire and the passage of the Ottoman legal system to the colonial era, with a special interest in the Ottoman Sharia court system and legal reforms during the long 19th century; social history of late and post-Ottoman Palestine; family history; microhistory; historiography; historical thinking. In my book, Family and Court: Legal Culture and Modernity in Late Ottoman Palestine (Syracuse University Press, 2006) I focus on the sharia courts of late-Ottoman Jaffa and Haifa. Employing a comparative socio-legal analysis of the records produced in the two courts, I discuss their legal culture. In the book, I offer observations on the impact of the growth and social transformation underwent by the port cities of Jaffa and Haifa on the socio-legal construction of the family. In my current research project I explore the Ottoman Family Code (1917). This important law is misrepresented in the historiography on both late and post-Ottoman Middle East. Another aspect of my research is the daily work of the Ottoman and post-Ottoman sharia courts in Palestine during the First World War and the early colonial period.