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MemberBradley Irish

Bradley J. Irish studies the literature and culture of sixteenth-century England, with a particular focus on the history of emotion.  His first book — Emotion in the Tudor Court: Literature, History, and Early Modern Feeling — draws on literary analysis, archival research, and cross-disciplinary scholarship in the sciences and humanities to interrogate the socioliterary operation of emotion in the Tudor courtly sphere. His research interests include: Tudor political and cultural history; emotions in early modern culture; Henrician literature and culture; Renaissance poetry, especially Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, and Spenser; the Elizabethan courtier poets; Renaissance drama, including Shakespeare; the revenge tragedy tradition; the stoic tradition in Renaissance literature; early modern manuscript culture; paleography and archival research.  

MemberCatherine Maguire

I am a PhD researcher in the School of Languages, Linguistics and Film at Queen Mary, University of London, where I am funded by the Wellcome Trust on a grant administered by the Centre for the History of the Emotions. My doctoral thesis traces an affective map of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century motherhood in peninsular Spain. Adopting a thematic approach based on a number of emotional concepts, it brings medical treatises, didactic literature, devotional texts, personal correspondence and records of pilgrimage sites into dialogue with contemporary scholarship on the history of emotions to reconstruct the emotional texture of motherhood in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Spain. More broadly, my research interests span late medieval and early modern popular piety, Church history, hagiography, and theories of emotions.   96   Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE X-NONE   /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Calibri”,sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;}  

MemberMary Agnes Edsall

My interdisciplinary scholarship focuses on the literatures and practices of Christian catechesis and devotion of the European Middle Ages, with attention to memory (personal and cultural), mnemonics, rhetorical theory, and the role of images and the emotions. I have recently published on early copies of Anselm of Canterbury’s Prayers and Meditations as exemplars of practice that drew their power from the way that they reproduced the charismatic presence of their author. Forthcoming articles address the patristic prehistory of medieval Arma Christi imagery and the connections between monastic anthologies for novice formation and household devotional anthologies of late medieval England. My research interests also include Hugh of Fouilloy, an under-studied writer whose works were widely read in his time (mid-twelfth century) and beyond.
I am currently writing a book, A Road of the Affections: Rhetoric, Catechesis, and the Cultivation of the Christian Self, A.D. 1-1150. This project rewrites a paradigm long central to the discipline of medieval history and the study of medieval devotional literature: affective piety. It demonstrates that the genealogy of affective piety goes back to the arts of disciplining the passions that originated in the philosophical schools of antiquity, for philosophers who taught disciplines of the soul were also rhetoricians who sought to move and persuade. Their methods were adapted by early Christian teachers and rhetorical appeals to the emotions became a basic preaching, literary, and prayer practice of the church. This project, therefore, recovers the history of how preaching, texts, and practices were used to shape the emotions and craft Christian selves at different times and places.

MemberStephen Hopkins

I work on all things apocrypha in Medieval religious literature, taking a comparative philological approach. My dissertation tracks the transmission of infernal apocrypha (especially the Gospel of Nicodemus and Vision of St. Paul) across Old English, Old Norse, Middle Welsh, and Old/Middle Irish periods. My idea of a good time is scrutinizing vernacular translations of theologically-oriented works, and thinking about the history of emotions and temporality. My favorite sport is etymology. I’m also into Ghost Stories (especially those of M.R. James), Horror, Medievalism (Tolkien and Lewis), and Vikings.

MemberAnna Shields

I specialize in classical Chinese literature of the Tang, Five Dynasties, and Northern Song eras. My particular interests include literary history and the emergence of new literary genres and styles in late medieval China; the sociology of literature; and the role of emotions in classical literature. My first book, Crafting a Collection: The Cultural Contexts and Poetic Practice of the Collection from among the Flowers (Huajian ji), published by the Harvard Asia Center, examined the emergence of the song lyric in a path-breaking anthology. My recent book, One Who Knows Me: Friendship and Literary Culture in Mid-Tang China, explores the literary performance of friendship in ninth-century China through a wide range of genres, including letters, prefaces, exchange poetry, and funerary texts. Other recent and forthcoming publications investigate emotions in medieval letters; the compilation of anthologies of Tang literature in the Northern Song; and the cultural influence of Tang dynasty anecdote collections. I’ve served as President of the T’ang Studies Society since 2011, and I am an editorial board member of the Library of Chinese Humanities Chinese-English translation series, published by De Gruyter. Before coming to Princeton, I taught at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, where I served both as Director of the Honors College (2007-2011) and as associate professor in the Dept. of Modern Languages, Linguistics, and Intercultural Communications (2007-2015), and at the University of Arizona (1999-2006). I’m currently working on a new book that traces the shaping of the Tang dynasty literary legacy during the Five Dynasties and Northern Song.