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MemberMichael Allan

Michael Allan is editor of Comparative Literature and associate professor of Comparative Literature at the University of Oregon. He is affiliated with Cinema Studies, Arabic, Middle East Studies, New Media and Culture, African Studies, and Comics Studies. His research focuses on debates in world literature, postcolonial studies, literary theory, as well as film and visual culture, primarily in Africa and the Middle East. In both his research and teaching, he bridges textual analysis with social theory, and draws from methods in anthropology, religion, queer theory and area studies. He is the author of In the Shadow of World Literature: Sites of Reading in Colonial Egypt (Princeton 2016, Co-Winner of the MLA Prize for a First Book), and is at work on a second book, Picturing the World: The Global Routes of Early Cinema, 1896-1903, which traces the transnational history of camera operators working for the Lumière Brothers film company. He serves on the editorial board of the Journal of World Literature, Philological Encounters, Syndicate Lit, and Middle East Topics & Arguments. He was elected a member of the executive committee for LLC Arabic (2017-2021) and a delegate of Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Comparative Literature (2019-2021) for the Modern Language Association. He was a EUME Fellow at the Forum for Transregional Studies in Berlin (2011-12, 2017-2018), a Townsend Fellow at the Townsend Center for the Humanities in Berkeley (2006-7), and a Presidential Intern at the American University in Cairo, where he worked with its Institute of Gender and Women’s Studies (2000-1). For two summers (2011-12), he was the site director for the CLS Arabic Program in Tangier, Morocco.

MemberJohn Meade

John Meade lives in Phoenix, AZ where he teaches at Phoenix Seminary. He has coauthored The Biblical Canon Lists from Early Christianity: Texts and Analysis (Oxford: Oxford University Press, forthcoming Nov. 2017) and he has edited the materials for A Critical Edition of the Hexaplaric Fragments of Job 22-42 to be published by Peeters late this year or early next for the Hexapla Institute. He plans to continue researching in the areas outlined under “Projects” below. He teaches and mentors students at the seminary, recognizing the holistic nature of education as character formation. His courses include Introduction to Old Testament/Hebrew Bible; the Hebrew Language sequence from Introduction to Exegesis (Isaiah, Job, Proverbs); electives in Biblical Theology, Formation of the Biblical Canon, Readings in the Septuagint, and Readings in the Apocrypha/Deuterocanon.

MemberTon van Kalmthout

Ton van Kalmthout studied Dutch Language and Literature at the University of Nijmegen (now Radboud University Nijmegen) and gained his Ph.D. in 1998 at the University of Amsterdam with a thesis on multidisciplinary art clubs in the Netherlands between 1880 and 1914. He worked as a teacher of Dutch at secondary school, and taught at the teacher-training programmes for Dutch at Hogeschool Rotterdam and the University of Leiden. He also worked as a teacher and post-doctoral researcher at the Dutch Language and Culture Section of the University of Groningen. Since 2005, he is a senior researcher at Huygens Institute for the History of the Netherlands. His field of interest is the international distribution and reception of literature in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

MemberHeather D Baker

As an Assyriologist who has also trained in archaeology and gained considerable experience of Near Eastern excavation, my primary interest is in combining textual information and material culture in the study of Mesopotamian society and economy. I apply this approach to the study of the Babylonian city and to investigating house and household. I am currently PI of an international project, Machine Translation and Automated Analysis of Cuneiform Languages (MTAAC), funded by SSHRC through the Trans-Atlantic Platform Digging into Data Challenge. Research Interests My work focuses on the social, political and economic history and material culture of 1st millennium BC Mesopotamia, with a particular interest in Babylonian urbanism and the built environment, and in the Neo-Assyrian royal household. My research and publications cover the following topics:

  • urbanism and the built environment
  • religious architecture
  • house and household
  • integration of textual and archaeological data
  • Hellenistic Babylonia (especially the city of Uruk)
  • the Assyrian royal palace and household
  • onomastics and naming practices
  • prosopography
  • slavery
  • society and economy
  • political history
  • cuneiform archives and archival practices

Employment

  • 2014–present: Assistant Professor in Ancient Near Eastern History, Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations, University of Toronto
  • 2009—2014: Senior Postdoc and PI of project “Royal Institutional Households in First Millennium BC Mesopotamia,” Institut fūr Orientalistik, University of Vienna
  • 2003–2009: Postdoc, START Project “The Economic History of Babylonia in the First Millennium BC,” Institut fūr Orientalistik, University of Vienna
  • 1999–2002: Research Associate, State Archives of Assyria Project, University of Helsinki; from July 1999, Editor-in-Charge of The Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire
  • 1993–1998: Editorial Assistant/IT Assistant (part-time), A Lexicon of Greek Personal Names (a British Academy Major Research Project)
  • 1994–1995: Curator Grade G (part-time), Department of the Middle East, the British Museum
  • 1984–1989: Field Archaeologist employed on various excavation and post-excavation projects in England, Cyprus, Turkey, Jordan, and Iraq

MemberAnita Traninger

Anita Traninger is Professor of Romance Literatures and Vice Director of the Dahlem Humanities Center at Freie Universität Berlin. Her areas of research include the history of rhetoric and dialectics, transcultural entanglements of literature and discourses of knowledge from the late Middle Ages to the nineteenth century, theories of gender and institutions as well as media history. She has been a fellow in residence at the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study, a visiting scholar at Oriel College at the University of Oxford and a Global Humanities Senior Fellow at Harvard University.