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MemberDuncan Money

I am a historian of central and southern Africa during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and I work at Leiden University in the Netherlands. Primarily my research looks at the history of the mining industry and I mostly research and write about the Zambian Copperbelt. My main areas of interest are histories of labour, race and global connections. Currently, I am a researcher at the African Studies Centre Leiden and before this I was a postdoctoral fellow at the International Studies Group, University of the Free State, South Africa.

MemberPeter-Alexander Kerkhof

I am a research fellow at Leiden University and Ghent University. My current research deals with the study of personal names and settlement names in Dutch and Belgian Brabant as a window on Brabantine medieval history. My expertise lies in on the crossroads between Germanic philology, Romance philology and medieval settlement history. Notable discoveries in my career have been

  • (2018) a Romance etymology for Dutch polder
  • (2018) a Celtic etymology for Dutch straf
  • (2014) reading the word auzandils on the Gothic Bologna fragment

From 2014-2016 and from 2018-20, I was a lecturer at Leiden University , teaching academic courses on Historical Linguistics, Old High German, Old Dutch, Old Saxon, Gothic, Paleolinguistics and Morphology. I have worked from 2016-2018 at the EVALISA project at Ghent University  where I focussed on the Proto-Indo-European origin of Old Germanic and Old Romance verbs that show non-canonical subject marking. In 2018, I received a PhD from Leiden University for my research on language contact between Merovingian Gallo-Romance and Merovingian Frankish. I have a keen interest in medieval vernacular languages and the historical experiences of the medieval commoner. By training, I am a linguist and a medievalist. In recent years, I have expanded my skills to include settlement history and agricultural history. I hope to improve my digital cartography skills in the future. I have written numerous popularizing articles about Dutch etymology, the history of the Dutch language and its links to the history of French. In the past years, I have also set up a national conference for Old Germanic Studies (Junius Symposium) together with my colleague Thijs Porck and I have given multiple newspaper and radio interviews on the prehistory of Dutch. I am also involved with several heritage projects highlighting the dimension of language when disclosing historical narratives.

MemberMark Turin

Mark Turin (PhD, Linguistics, Leiden University, 2006) is an anthropologist, linguist and occasional radio presenter, and an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia. From 2014-2018, Dr. Turin served as Chair of the First Nations and Endangered Languages Program and from 2016-2018, as Acting Co-Director of the University’s new Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies. Before joining UBC, he was an Associate Research Scientist with the South Asian Studies Council at Yale University, and the Founding Program Director of the Yale Himalaya Initiative. He continues to hold an appointment as Visiting Associate Professor at the Yale School Forestry & Environmental Studies. Prior to Yale, Dr. Turin worked a Research Associate at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge. At UBC, Dr. Turin is an Associate Member of the Department of Asian Studies an Affiliate Member of the Institute of Asian Research.

MemberBehnam M. Fomeshi

Specializing in comparative literature, Behnam M. Fomeshi is interested in Iranian studies, American studies and in particular the intersection of the two. He is also highly experienced in literary theory, with experience in teaching and considerable expertise in Persian language, literature and culture. He lectured at various national and international conferences, symposia, colloquia, and workshops. He has taught courses on various genres as well as study skills. Behnam is a fellow of Alexander von Humboldt Foundation to conduct research on Whitman and Persian poetry. In addition to a Humboldt fellowship, he has received several grants including two for research at the University of St Andrews and Leiden University. His works have been widely published and his monograph, The Persian Whitman: Beyond a Literary Reception was released with Leiden University Press in 2019. https://www.lup.nl/product/the-persian-whitman/ Behnam would like to keep in touch with scholars of Persian and American literature from around the world. Any piece of information regarding the presence of American literature in Iran (e.g. an early translation of American literature into Persian) is highly appreciated.   کوچکترین نکته ای دربارۀ «پذیرش ادبیات امریکا در ایران»، برای نمونه ترجمه های نخستین از آثار نویسندگان آمریکایی به فارسی، به پژوهش من کمک شایانی خواهد کرد. پیشاپیش از عزیزانی که در این باره مرا راهنمایی بفرمایند سپاسگزارم. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Behnam_Mirzababazadeh_Fomeshi2

MemberHuw Twiston Davies

Huw Twiston Davies is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Leiden University, working on the NWO-VIDI funded project, “The Walking Dead: The Making of a Cultural Geography at Saqqara” (Feb 2018 – present). The main focus of his research is the composition, copying, transmission, and development of ancient Egyptian literary and religious texts from the New Kingdom (c. 1550-1077 BC). He completed his PhD on the transmission of the Instruction of Ani and the Instruction of Amenemope at the University of Liverpool in 2018, under the supervision of Professor Christopher Eyre and Dr Roland Enmarch. Since October 2019, he has also been a teaching assistant for the University of Manchester’s online Certificate and short courses in Egyptology. From January 2016 until February 2017 , he was a Curatorial Assistant at the Garstang Museum of Archaeology at the University of Liverpool, where in addition to other duties, he was project curator for the exhibitions Meroë: Africa’s Forgotten Empire  (May-Sep 2016), and The Book of the Dead: Passport through the Underworld (May 2017 – Sep 2018).

MemberCarlo Ierna

My name is Carlo Ierna and I’m currently working as a lecturer in history of philosophy at the Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen and the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. I’ve previously been part-time, fixed-term lecturer at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (feb-mar and sep-oct 2017 and feb-mar 2018), Utrecht University (Nov 2018-Jan 2019), Leiden University (Sep 2018-Feb 2019), and the University of Groningen (2016-2018). During 2017 I was part of the research team working on the project “From Logical Objectivism to Reism: Bolzano and the School of Brentano”, together with Robin Rollinger and Hynek Janousek, and member of the Institute of Philosophy at the Czech Academy of the Sciences. From January to May 2014 I was a Visiting Fellow in Philosophy at Harvard and in the summer of 2015 at the Brentano Archives in Graz. From 2012 to 2016 I was a postdoctoral researcher at Utrecht University with an NWO VENI research project on the renewal of the ideal of “Philosophy as Science” in the School of Brentano. In September 2016 I obtained my university teaching qualification. From 2009 to 2012 I worked on a postdoctoral project at the KULeuven on the philosophy of mathematics and logic in the School of Brentano.

MemberPeter Snowdon

Peter Snowdon is a filmmaker, researcher and writer. He has taught filmmaking at the University of the West of Scotland (2014-16) and in the visual ethnography programme at Leiden University (2016-18). His found-footage film The Uprising, made out of YouTube videos from the Arab revolutions, won the Opus Bonum Award for Best World Documentary on its début at the 2013 Jihlava International Documentary Film Festival, and has since been screened widely around the world at festivals (Edinburgh, Turin, Bratislava) and in museums (MoMA NYC, Palazzo Grassi). The film is now available free to view at theuprising.be. His book, The People Are Not an Image: Vernacular Video after the Arab Revolutions, will be published by Verso in 2020. His current research focuses on filmmaking as a somatic practice. His approach to teaching is inspired by a number of movement practices, and in particular by Mary Overlie’s Six Viewpoints.