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MemberDale J. Correa

Dale J. Correa, PhD, is the Middle Eastern Studies Librarian and History Coordinator for the University of Texas Libraries, the University of Texas at Austin. She serves as the liaison to the Department of History, the Department and Center for Middle Eastern Studies, and the Islamic Studies Program. Dr. Correa specializes in Islamic legal theory, theology,  philosophy, and Qur’anic studies, with a particular interest in the intellectual tradition of the eastern regions of the Islamicate empire (namely, Transoxania, which is today in Uzbekistan/Tajikistan). Her research, although rooted in the 10th-12th centuries CE, extends to contemporary conceptions of what it means to be Muslim, particularly in Eurasia. Her current book project examines the development and flourishing of the Transoxanian approach to testimony, or communication: that is, the transmission of knowledge of a past event by agents over time and space. This study brings together Qur’anic exegesis, Islamic legal theory, and Islamic theology with contemporary approaches to epistemology, philosophy of language and the mind, and logic to examine the consequences of positing epistemology as a confessional boundary.

MemberNga Bellis-Phan

Nga Bellis-Phan is a Legal Historian specialized in European Early modern Private law and Economic history (16th-18th century). After graduating from law school with a full scholarship from the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, she is now a funded PhD candidate at the Institute of Legal History – University Paris 2 Panthéon-Assas and a teaching assistant at the Law School of University Paris-Nanterre. Her research focuses on securities for debt based on movable goods, with a particular interest in the legal theory and practice of pawns and pawnbroking. Academic interests > European Legal History & Economic History (16th-19th century) Securities for debts, Credit networks, Movable property, Insolvency > Vietnamese Legal History (15th-20th century) Full up-to-date CV here.

MemberMonica Lopez Lerma

…         D.E.A. in Law, Department of Moral and Political Philosophy of Law,                         University of Valencia, Spain

2000             LL.M. in Jurisprudence, European Academy of Legal Theory, Brussels,  Belgium.

1996-1997    Erasmus Student, Law School, University of Orleans, France.

1992-1997    Licenciate in Law, University of Valencia, Spain….

Monica is an Assistant Professor of Spanish and Humanities at Reed College. She received a PhD in Comparative Literature and a Graduate Certificate in Film Studies from the University of Michigan. She also holds a Law degree from the University of Valencia (Spain) and a LL.M. in Jurisprudence from the European Academy of Legal Theory (Belgium). At Reed she teaches a variety of interdisciplinary courses in film theory, law and violence, justice and the senses, and cinema and human rights. She has also taught at the School of International Relations of the Kyrgyz State National University and at the Faculty of Law of the University of Helsinki.   Her research interests include contemporary Spanish film and literature, with particular emphasis on film theory, gender, aesthetics, and cultural and theoretical aspects of law. Her work has appeared in Revue Interdisciplinaire d’Etudes Juridiques, Conserveries Mémorielles, Southern California Interdisciplinary Law Journal, Política Común, Nordic Journal of Law and Social Research, as well as in various edited volumes. She is the co-editor of Rancière and Law (Routledge, 2018) and is currently finishing a monograph entitled Sensing Justice through Contemporary Spanish Cinema: Aesthetics, Politics, Law (to be published by Edinburgh University Press). She was co-editor in chief of the journal No Foundations: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Law and Justice from 2012 to 2017.

MemberKeerthi Purushothaman

My MA dissertation was on understanding a particular kind of urban space within Chennai, India, which falls at the intersection of legal pluralism (porosity of land tenure), religiosity (temple-owned land), and public policy (intersecting governance institutions). My broad research interests include urban sociology, land governance, public housing, legal pluralism, and urban sustainability. Having graduated from an interdisciplinary five-year integrated course, my research interests have varied throughout the years. Being exposed to literature from different disciplines without its rigid boundaries has helped me read them in relation to each other. I am also interested in reading philosophy, economic history, poetry, gender theory, and disability studies.

MemberAlmas Khan

As an intellectual historian, I analyze how modernism in American law and literature has shaped the quest for equal citizenship. Drawing on my Ph.D. in English and my J.D. with a focus on constitutional history, I interrogate how creative forms of legal dissent – ranging from judicial opinions to lyric poems – have sparked constitutional reimagination in the context of African American, working-class, and women’s experiences. My current book project, An Intellectual Reconstruction: American Legal Realism, Literary Realism, and the Formation of Citizenship, construes legal realism (a progenitor of critical race theory) and literary realism as a major post-Civil War movements connecting disciplinary critiques to equitist politics. I have additional interests in British literary modernism and postcolonial studies, having composed articles on Joseph Conrad’s and Virginia Woolf’s texts. My literary and legal scholarship has been published in several anthologies and journals, including Critical Insights: Social Justice and American Literature; Critical Insights: Inequality; Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History; the Cambridge Journal of Postcolonial Literary Inquiry; and the Chicago Journal of International Law. Forthcoming articles include “Black Lives Matter and Legal Reconstructions of Elegiac Forms” and “Applied Legal Storytelling: Toward a Stylistics of Embodiment.” I have also published widely on writing studies pedagogy through the lens of critical theory, drawing on extensive experiences teaching literature, law, and composition. My pedagogical scholarship has appeared in the Washburn Law JournalPerspectives: Teaching Legal Research & WritingThe Law Teacher, and the anthology Writing as a Way of Staying Human in a Time that Isn’t. When not immersed in literature, law, history, and philosophy, I explore modernist-inflected alternative music, fashion, interior design, landscapes, gardens, and other aesthetic phenomena suiting my fancy.

MemberYael Landman

Hebrew Bible; ancient Near East; biblical, cuneiform, and early Jewish law; law and literature; Semitic linguistics My work examines the Hebrew Bible in comparison with ancient Near Eastern sources and draws on contemporary legal and literary theory and linguistics, with further recourse to ancient Jewish sources and medieval exegesis. I am currently transforming my dissertation into a book entitled Legal Practice, Legal Writing: The Biblical Bailment Law and Divine Justice.  I am Acquisitions Editor of Hebrew Bible, Ancient Near East, and Jewish Studies at Gorgias Press. If you are interested in submitting a proposal, email me at yael@gorgiaspress.com. I am currently Visiting Research Fellow in Judaic Studies at CUNY Brooklyn College.

MemberBryan Wagner

My primary research focuses on African American expression in the context of slavery and its aftermath. I have secondary interests in legal history, cultural theory, and popular music. My first book, Disturbing the Peace: Black Culture and the Police Power after Slavery, a study of black vernacular expression and its entanglement with the law, was published by Harvard University Press in 2009. I’m currently working on two books: Fables of Moral Economy, a close analysis of African-derived global traditions engaged with problems of property and subsistence, and Fugitives, Contrabands, Spies, Servants & Laborers, an experiment in historiography that imagines the new social history of slavery from the standpoint of its source materials.

MemberDrew M. Loewe

  • I am an Associate Professor of Writing and Rhetoric at St. Edward’s University in Austin, Texas.
  • St. Edward’s has had a standalone Writing major since 1987, and I teach a variety of rhetorical theory and criticism courses in the major, as well as writing courses in the general-education core, legal writing, editing, and Honors Thesis Prep.
  • I also direct the university’s Writing Center.
  • Before I went back to school to earn my MA and PhD, I practiced law in California and in Texas.