Search

MemberAlmas Khan

As an intellectual historian, I analyze how modernism in American law and literature has shaped the quest for equal citizenship. Drawing on my Ph.D. in English and my J.D. with a focus on constitutional history, I interrogate how creative forms of legal dissent – ranging from judicial opinions to lyric poems – have sparked constitutional reimagination in the context of African American, working-class, and women’s experiences. My current book project, An Intellectual Reconstruction: American Legal Realism, Literary Realism, and the Formation of Citizenship, construes legal realism (a progenitor of critical race theory) and literary realism as a major post-Civil War movements connecting disciplinary critiques to equitist politics. I have additional interests in British literary modernism and postcolonial studies, having composed articles on Joseph Conrad’s and Virginia Woolf’s texts. My literary and legal scholarship has been published in several anthologies and journals, including Critical Insights: Social Justice and American Literature; Critical Insights: Inequality; Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History; the Cambridge Journal of Postcolonial Literary Inquiry; and the Chicago Journal of International Law. Recent and forthcoming articles include “Black Lives Matter and Legal Reconstructions of Elegiac Forms” and “Applied Legal Storytelling: Toward a Stylistics of Embodiment.” I have also published widely on writing studies pedagogy through the lens of critical theory, drawing on extensive experiences teaching literature, law, and composition. My pedagogical scholarship has appeared in the Washburn Law JournalPerspectives: Teaching Legal Research & WritingThe Law Teacher, and the anthology Writing as a Way of Staying Human in a Time that Isn’t. When not immersed in literature, law, history, and philosophy, I explore modernist-inflected alternative music, fashion, interior design, landscapes, gardens, and other aesthetic phenomena suiting my fancy.

MemberJordan Stepp

During the day I act as the Intellectual Property and Contracts Manager for University of Georgia Press. I negotiate contracts; buy and sell sub-rights and translations; champion fair use, open access, and accessibility; occasionally acquire a book; and handle all legal issues for the Press under the eye of our General Counsel. On nights and weekends I’m a freelance writer and website content manager. I’ve written for publications both locally in Athens and far flung across the globe. Though music is my main thing, I also dabble in lit crit, legal studies, and general non-fiction storytelling. I, like everyone in town, am working on a book. Ask me about it. When not writing, I do grunt work for websites like updating dead links, correcting spelling errors, etc. During college, I promoted multiple local shows, created my own music oriented website, organized special events, interviewed musical legends, built a strong network of creative individuals, held down a job, hobby, volunteer position, freelance job, and two internships as I was studying for my Journalism degree, and established myself as a dependable, hard worker capable of meeting the strictest of deadlines, be they for one of my freelance writing gigs or an important upcoming event. Since college, I have had content featured on NPR, managed a hoard of interns, overseen a department of college student workers, grown my web-based organization, and started a novel.

MemberIris Agmon

I completed my Ph.D. at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 1995 and won a post-doc fellowship at the (then) newly-established department of Middle East Studies, Ben Gurion University of the Negev. In 1997 I joined the department as a faculty member. My fields of research and teaching include socio-legal history of the Ottoman Empire and the passage of the Ottoman legal system to the colonial era, with a special interest in the Ottoman Sharia court system and legal reforms during the long 19th century; social history of late and post-Ottoman Palestine; family history; microhistory; historiography; historical thinking. In my book, Family and Court: Legal Culture and Modernity in Late Ottoman Palestine (Syracuse University Press, 2006) I focus on the sharia courts of late-Ottoman Jaffa and Haifa. Employing a comparative socio-legal analysis of the records produced in the two courts, I discuss their legal culture. In the book, I offer observations on the impact of the growth and social transformation underwent by the port cities of Jaffa and Haifa on the socio-legal construction of the family. In my current research project I explore the Ottoman Family Code (1917). This important law is misrepresented in the historiography on both late and post-Ottoman Middle East. Another aspect of my research is the daily work of the Ottoman and post-Ottoman sharia courts in Palestine during the First World War and the early colonial period.

MemberJacob Currie

I am a medievalist, Latinist, and legal historian. I grew up in Toronto and studied classical and medieval languages there before moving to Trinity College, Cambridge for a master’s and doctorate in medieval legal history. After leaving Cambridge, I worked at Oxford, largely on English medieval manuscript provenance. Since then I have been a research fellow at the Institut de recherche et d’histoire des textes, Paris (part of the CNRS).

MemberKeerthi Purushothaman

My MA dissertation was on understanding a particular kind of urban space within Chennai, India, which falls at the intersection of legal pluralism (porosity of land tenure), religiosity (temple-owned land), and public policy (intersecting governance institutions). My broad research interests include urban sociology, land governance, public housing, legal pluralism, and urban sustainability. Having graduated from an interdisciplinary five-year integrated course, my research interests have varied throughout the years. Being exposed to literature from different disciplines without its rigid boundaries has helped me read them in relation to each other. I am also interested in reading philosophy, economic history, poetry, gender theory, and disability studies.

MemberKatherine Har

My research interests include Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman and Angevin history, law and society, medieval manuscripts, and the intersection between legal, historical, and literary writing. My current project and research interests developed out of a background including an undergraduate thesis concerning the depiction of Champenois and French judicial procedure in Chrétien de Troyes’ twelfth-century romance, Le chevalier au lion, and an MA dissertation on the nature of sokerights and more generally soke in the Leges Henrici Primi. From April 2014 – March 2015, I was an intern at the British Library. My internship was in the Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts section of the Western Heritage Department where I assisted with the preparation of the Library’s major temporary exhibition ‘Magna Carta: Law, Liberty, Legacy’.